Book recommendation (sci-fi) Page 9

  • dai_bonehead 13 Jul 2010 17:22:00 487 posts
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    brokenkey wrote:
    I'm going to plug Snow Crash again. And everything else Neal Stephenson has done.

    Snowcrash is awesome, the Diamond Age is superb, and Cryptonomicon is excellent.

    Not too sure about his work after cryptonomicon. Gave up on quicksilver and have not dared open the others in the Baroque Cycle. Trying to get through Anathem, now. 300 or so pages in. I think he needs to reconnect with his inner writer, and regain some energy.
  • burns 31 Aug 2010 10:34:17 1,138 posts
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    Can anyone recommend any cyberpunk books similar to William Gibson's Neuromancer? I particularly like the elements of Hacking, Cyperspace and Technological Espionage. I have read several of Gibson's books and also recently really enjoyed Michael Marshall Smith's Spares, One of Us and Only Forward.
  • localnotail 31 Aug 2010 10:35:52 23,072 posts
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    burns wrote:
    Can anyone recommend any cyberpunk books similar to William Gibson's Neuromancer? I particularly like the elements of Hacking, Cyperspace and Technological Espionage. I have read several of Gibson's books and also recently really enjoyed Michael Marshall Smith's Spares, One of Us and Only Forward.

    Obvious question: have you read any Neal Stephenson? If not, start at the beginning with "Zodiac" (or even "The Big U" if you can find it - although he tends to disown that one, which is wrong, because it's really funny).
  • burns 31 Aug 2010 10:52:03 1,138 posts
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    localnotail wrote:
    burns wrote:
    Can anyone recommend any cyberpunk books similar to William Gibson's Neuromancer? I particularly like the elements of Hacking, Cyperspace and Technological Espionage. I have read several of Gibson's books and also recently really enjoyed Michael Marshall Smith's Spares, One of Us and Only Forward.

    Obvious question: have you read any Neal Stephenson? If not, start at the beginning with "Zodiac" (or even "The Big U" if you can find it - although he tends to disown that one, which is wrong, because it's really funny).

    I have of heard of him but have never read any of his books. Is his style more comedic?
  • localnotail 31 Aug 2010 11:09:22 23,072 posts
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    There is always some humour in there but like Michael Marshall Smith he is not really a comic writer. The Big U is set in a university that is so huge its population go a little bit crazy. It made me laugh a lot, it's a lot lighter than his other stuff.

    The other books he has written get ever more detailed and complex, while still being very readable. "Snow Crash" and "The Diamond Age" would probably be right up your alley, as would "Cryptonomicon" I think. But I like "Zodiac", it's a good introduction to his style and not too long. If you liked that, you would definitely like the others which are ever-more cyberpunk. But more realistic cyberpunk than Gibson, IMO.

    If not, try Bruce Stirling. He's from the same stable as Gibson.
  • burns 31 Aug 2010 12:24:46 1,138 posts
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    many thanks, will check some out.
  • Gruff 31 Aug 2010 13:16:30 3,601 posts
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    Bruce Stirling did one with Gibson i seem to remember

    Was it called the "Difference Engine" was decent
    kinda victorian steam punk thingy.
  • Tonka 31 Aug 2010 14:14:16 30,901 posts
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    Neal Stephenson is fantastic. But start with Snow Crash.

    And it was indeed called the difference engine.

    I also recommend Rudy Rucker.
  • effinjamie 12 Sep 2010 21:12:58 994 posts
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    just finished Slaughterhouse 5.
    Disappointed to say the least, while the concept in general was interesting, I couldn't get past the fact that I found the main character totally unlikable.
  • Deleted user 12 September 2010 21:20:45
    The Gap Cycle by Stephen Donaldson is epic. Brutal, insanely twisty space opera with a plot that just keeps upping the stakes until by the 5th book you can't believe how small it all started.
  • PearOfAnguish 12 Sep 2010 23:26:26 7,573 posts
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    Gap Cycle was mentioned a few pages back.

    Hated it. Irritating, unlikeable characters and a glacial pace, it went on for what felt like hundreds of pages with nothing happening. Also a disturbing insight into the mind of a man with a rape fetish.
  • Deleted user 13 September 2010 19:07:25
    PearOfAnguish wrote:

    Gap Cycle was mentioned a few pages back.

    Soz about that, I did run a quick search but clearly failed. Agree the characters are unlikeable to a man, but then that didn't bother me in this series, where everything serves the plot. Also agree that the first book especially is a worrying glance into Donaldson's dark side (he says so himself in the afterword), very disturbing and really hard going. Can't agree the series is slow-moving, though, it reminds me of how one review described Return of the King (the film) - "a sprint-paced marathon".

    The review linked below is nearly as long as the books it's discussing, and utterly riddled with spoilers so it's only for those who've already read the series, but it's stuffed with interesting points and arguments. The final line of the review is:

    "It's gripping, it's infuriating, it's mesmerising, it's flawed, it's brilliant. It's the Gap, and I love it."

    Sounds about right to me.

    http://www.reviewsbygavrielle.com/gap.shtml
  • Oh-Bollox 22 Sep 2010 00:36:43 6,513 posts
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    Declare, by Tim Powers.

    Set in WWII through to the Cold War, it's about espionage, and a lot of it is factual, but it incorporates the supernatural, as secret secret services use magic and sorcery to fight the Cold War. Quite a lot of the framework is factual, it features a lot of real people (one of the main characters being shitbag Kim Philby) and real events, but fills in the unknown bits in history with the supernatural. Good stuff.
  • Deleted user 22 September 2010 19:15:34
    burns wrote:
    Can anyone recommend any cyberpunk books similar to William Gibson's Neuromancer? I particularly like the elements of Hacking, Cyperspace and Technological Espionage. I have read several of Gibson's books and also recently really enjoyed Michael Marshall Smith's Spares, One of Us and Only Forward.

    You could also try Reckless Sleep, Dark Heavens (it's sequel) and Icarus, all by Roger Levy.

    The first two are particularly good.
  • Deleted user 22 September 2010 19:16:16
    Oh-Bollox wrote:
    Declare, by Tim Powers.

    Set in WWII through to the Cold War, it's about espionage, and a lot of it is factual, but it incorporates the supernatural, as secret secret services use magic and sorcery to fight the Cold War. Quite a lot of the framework is factual, it features a lot of real people (one of the main characters being shitbag Kim Philby) and real events, but fills in the unknown bits in history with the supernatural. Good stuff.

    This is why I read this thread, that sounds great matey, will pick it up.
  • Jetset_UK 22 Sep 2010 19:24:25 3,578 posts
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    I loved 'House of Suns' by Alastair Reynolds, had some trouble putting it down in fact. Anyone else recommend any of his other stuff?
  • RunningMan 22 Sep 2010 19:32:47 3,000 posts
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    Jetset_UK wrote:
    I loved 'House of Suns' by Alastair Reynolds, had some trouble putting it down in fact. Anyone else recommend any of his other stuff?

    Well the whole of the revelation space series is excellent. Enjoyed the Prefect and century rain. Century rain is set in it's own universe unlike most of his other books. The short stories are good too.
  • President_Weasel 22 Sep 2010 19:54:53 12,355 posts
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    localnotail wrote:
    burns wrote:
    Can anyone recommend any cyberpunk books similar to William Gibson's Neuromancer? I particularly like the elements of Hacking, Cyperspace and Technological Espionage. I have read several of Gibson's books and also recently really enjoyed Michael Marshall Smith's Spares, One of Us and Only Forward.

    Obvious question: have you read any Neal Stephenson? If not, start at the beginning with "Zodiac" (or even "The Big U" if you can find it - although he tends to disown that one, which is wrong, because it's really funny).

    Richard Morgan's books have a modern cyberpunk feel. Actually, I just think everyone should read them since they're excellent.
    Your results may vary with Neal Stephenson; personally I loved Cryptonomicon, but my flatmate just could not get into it at all.

    the Gap cycle was deeply, deeply disappointing for me. Seemed like he'd come up with half a concept (the Ring Cycle in space), decided he could write sci-fi because hey it must be just the same as fantasy, and then churned out some books. I read them, but was annoyed by their not-very-goodness while reading. Takes a lot to make me give up on a book once I've started, and the same with series to a lesser extent.
  • DaM 22 Sep 2010 20:24:55 17,459 posts
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    Jetset_UK wrote:
    I loved 'House of Suns' by Alastair Reynolds, had some trouble putting it down in fact. Anyone else recommend any of his other stuff?

    Yes, although he has some critics here (mainly that Otto, thank god he can't get online from prison), they are all great, particularly the first few.
  • Deleted user 24 September 2010 11:12:24
    What culture novel do I read after Phlebas? I've already read Excession.

    I'm only 1/4 of the way through Phlebas but I want to know what to buy now as I'll probably finish it in the states.
  • RyanDS 24 Sep 2010 11:16:19 13,280 posts
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    Definitely Player of Games.
  • glo 24 Sep 2010 11:16:27 3,695 posts
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    I don't think they are in any particular order. I would recommend Player of Games or Use of Weapons next.
  • Oh-Bollox 24 Sep 2010 11:18:08 6,513 posts
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    Player of Games, a must for any gamer.
  • JoeBlade 24 Sep 2010 12:03:54 5,109 posts
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    mcmonkeyplc wrote:
    What culture novel do I read after Phlebas? I've already read Excession.

    I'm only 1/4 of the way through Phlebas but I want to know what to buy now as I'll probably finish it in the states.
    To chime in with the others: The Player of Games for sure.

    Although if you'd prefer a stand-alone non-Culture story for a change then I'd recommend Feersum Endjinn, bit weird but I thoroughly enjoyed that one. Didn't like Against a Dark Background and State of the Art as much as his other ones.
  • JoeBlade 24 Sep 2010 12:08:21 5,109 posts
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    RunningMan wrote:
    Jetset_UK wrote:
    I loved 'House of Suns' by Alastair Reynolds, had some trouble putting it down in fact. Anyone else recommend any of his other stuff?

    Well the whole of the revelation space series is excellent. Enjoyed the Prefect and century rain. Century rain is set in it's own universe unlike most of his other books. The short stories are good too.
    Now that we're on this topic: is Absolution Gap meant to be the end of the Revelation Space storyline? It felt as though it could indeed be considered an ending although there's a lot of room for further elaboration as well IMO. I wouldn't mind some more :)

    Apparently The Prefect is set in the same universe but is sort of a prequel? Not sure what to think of that, it definitely doesn't have the appeal of a sequel in this case.
  • RunningMan 24 Sep 2010 12:50:45 3,000 posts
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    JoeBlade wrote:
    RunningMan wrote:
    Jetset_UK wrote:
    I loved 'House of Suns' by Alastair Reynolds, had some trouble putting it down in fact. Anyone else recommend any of his other stuff?

    Well the whole of the revelation space series is excellent. Enjoyed the Prefect and century rain. Century rain is set in it's own universe unlike most of his other books. The short stories are good too.
    Now that we're on this topic: is Absolution Gap meant to be the end of the Revelation Space storyline? It felt as though it could indeed be considered an ending although there's a lot of room for further elaboration as well IMO. I wouldn't mind some more :)

    Apparently The Prefect is set in the same universe but is sort of a prequel? Not sure what to think of that, it definitely doesn't have the appeal of a sequel in this case.

    Some of the short stories go further into the revelation universe. Try "Galactic North" out, it's fairly awesome.
  • Centrifugal 3 Oct 2010 17:38:23 13 posts
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    Dune + Frank Herbert's sequels
    Ender Saga up to Ender's Shadow, they get a bit meh after that
  • Deleted user 3 October 2010 17:43:21
    JoeBlade wrote:
    RunningMan wrote:
    Jetset_UK wrote:
    I loved 'House of Suns' by Alastair Reynolds, had some trouble putting it down in fact. Anyone else recommend any of his other stuff?

    Well the whole of the revelation space series is excellent. Enjoyed the Prefect and century rain. Century rain is set in it's own universe unlike most of his other books. The short stories are good too.
    Now that we're on this topic: is Absolution Gap meant to be the end of the Revelation Space storyline? It felt as though it could indeed be considered an ending although there's a lot of room for further elaboration as well IMO. I wouldn't mind some more :)

    Apparently The Prefect is set in the same universe but is sort of a prequel? Not sure what to think of that, it definitely doesn't have the appeal of a sequel in this case.

    The Prefect is worth a read. More of a straightforward thriller than his other stuff though.

    The short stories expand on things (both pre- and post- Absolution Gap) and finish off what's mentioned in passing at the end of Absolution Gap.

    Just finished reading Pushing Ice, which is one of his best imo. Completely separate to the Revelation Space stories but the same epic scale.
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