The **Official** Homebrew Beer Thread Page 5

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  • BanjoMan 20 May 2009 12:17:25 13,692 posts
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    How long's it been? Usually takes 2 or 3 days to build up a head of steam. If not, it may be that the wort was too warm when you pitched your yeast. Got a beer thermometer?
  • rutter 21 May 2009 08:58:19 1,918 posts
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    It's been on the go since Saturday afternoon, so what's that, 4 and a bit days. I put the yeast in right at the end. I did 3.5 litres hot water rinsing the stuff out of the can. Then the ~20 litres cold water. So, it should have been pretty much cold when the yeast went in.

    It's got a bit of crust round the edges and some froth on top. Smells very nice though, really starting to smell like lager.

    No beer thermometer - although I could probably *borrow* one from work :)
  • BanjoMan 21 May 2009 12:27:10 13,692 posts
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    You'd be surprised - I find the temperature to be around 25 or so after adding the cold water, so I end up leaving it a couple of hours. Here's a couple of tips for pitching yeast:

    - agitate the fuck out of the wort when you're adding the sugar and water. You want to froth it up before you even think about chucking the yeast in.

    - using a plastic jug, take a pint of the wort out once you've added all the water and measure its temperature. If your pint is 18-21 C, tip the yeast sachet into the jug. That is your yeast starter and you need to leave it for half an hour to get the yeast working. You'll see when it's ready because it'll be frothing, so tip it in, give your wort a stir and seal it up. And fit an airlock.

    All that type of info is on my blog: http://banjosbrew.blogspot.com
  • rutter 21 May 2009 14:19:21 1,918 posts
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    Nice one - thanks for the tips mate. Will check out your blog.
  • rutter 5 Jun 2009 09:04:01 1,918 posts
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    I tried my first pint of homebrew last night. A couple of days if not weeks early really, but I couldn't resist before I went on holiday. I actually drank 4 pints so it wasn't too bad at all! The beer is actually really clear, just the pint glass is fucking filthy!

    A little watery, with a hint of yeasty taste. I'm hoping that'll ease off with a few more weeks. The sediment was surprisingly firm. The head was a bit dissapointing and dissapeared quite quick. But all in all, I'm quite chuffed.

    Next up is some Turbo Cider :)
  • rutter 20 Aug 2009 08:42:45 1,918 posts
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    Wilkinsons are great for cheap beer kits. I've never tried them personally, but a guy at work has and said they're pretty good.
  • rutter 20 Aug 2009 08:43:08 1,918 posts
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    or, http://brew-it-yourself.co.uk/
  • Deleted user 20 August 2009 08:50:20
    Hmmm...think I will kick off that 5 gallon wine kit today... I love EG for pushing me in the right way... and for giving me somethign to do rather than work ;)
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  • Nanocrystal 29 May 2013 10:30:37 1,675 posts
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    So I've got 20 litres of IPA fermenting in my garage now. Bought a kit with a heater which is keeping it at a nice constant 22 degrees. The water levels in the airlock are showing some pressure build-up but no bubbling yet. Bit worried the seal around it is leaking.

    Anyways, anyone else brewing their own beer right now and looking to share tips?
  • Benno 29 May 2013 10:38:01 11,700 posts
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    I would say 22 degrees is a little on the higher side. What yeast are you using? A general rule I try and stick to is to keep the temperature between 18-20 degrees. I find the beer tastes cleaner, and less like homebrew.

    Most of the popular fish tank heaters only go down to 20-22 degrees, but i scored a cheap 6 one off ebay which goes down to 16 degrees. Very useful for brewing!

    I have nothing on at the minute, my last brew was a St Peters Ruby Red, which was average at best. My brew before that was the popular Woodfordes Wherry, which came out fantastic.

    Another one I can recommend is the Muntons Old Smugglers Ale, that was probably the best i've brewed.
  • Nanocrystal 29 May 2013 11:09:31 1,675 posts
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    Hmm ok, maybe I'll turn it down a bit, it has an adjustable thermostat. No idea what type of yeast it is, it came with the tin of wort. And this is my first attempt so I'm very much a beginner. Just hoping for something drinkable for now.
  • Alastair 29 May 2013 11:16:23 21,949 posts
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    Benno wrote:
    Another one I can recommend is the Muntons Old Smugglers Ale, that was probably the best i've brewed.
    I have a feeling I made some of that once.. Turned out pretty well from memory - never made anything again to match it.
  • Benno 29 May 2013 12:33:56 11,700 posts
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    Nanocrystal wrote:
    Hmm ok, maybe I'll turn it down a bit, it has an adjustable thermostat. No idea what type of yeast it is, it came with the tin of wort. And this is my first attempt so I'm very much a beginner. Just hoping for something drinkable for now.
    The kits usually advise higher temperatures and shorter fermentation/conditioning times to try and speed up the process and get drinkable beer in peoples hands as quickly as possible.

    I think a good idea is to leave the wort fermenting at about 18-19 degrees for 2-3 weeks in your primary vessel, then bottle up (adding priming sugar) and leave in a warm place for a week, then a cold place for 3 weeks.

    What kit are you using out of interest? I fancy brewing an IPA, just trying to settle on which one.
  • Nanocrystal 29 May 2013 21:16:37 1,675 posts
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    It's an Aussie beer, Coopers IPA, so not sure you'll be able to get it in the UK or not.

    My plan is to leave it fermenting for 2-3 weeks, bottle it and then drink it over the next 2-3 weeks to get a feel for how it develops in-bottle. I've also got some carbonation tablets that you add at the bottling stage. Have you used these?
  • Thorbz 6 Oct 2014 21:27:10 128 posts
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    Any All-Grain brewers on here ?

    BTW, if anyone wants any brewing tips, try Jimsbeerkit.
  • EMarkM 30 Jan 2015 12:12:58 4,471 posts
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    Thread-poke!

    Just been directed here from the "Ale" thread (thanks Vortex808).

    Mrs. M. and I encouraged my brother and his family to get us some homebrew gear this year.

    We're all set up now to get a golden ale going, and I've just ordered an IPA kit to follow on from that.

    Edit: to BanjoMan - I also play a bit of banjo (been learning on and off for a couple of years, really need to get back into it!) - do you play?

    Edited by EMarkM at 12:14:25 30-01-2015
  • Thorbz 16 Nov 2015 22:57:12 128 posts
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    How did your golden ale turn out ?
  • FWB 6 Mar 2018 17:56:09 54,432 posts
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    So I've been doing this for a while now, but want to move on from bottles to some mini kegs cos I'm fed up with all the glass I'm using. So...

    1) Will a metal container affect the beer?
    2) Will the beer last as long? I assume once its opened it has to be consumed soonish?
    3) Anything special I need to do when filling it up?
    4) Anything special I need to do when pouring?
    5) Any recommendations for smallish kegs? Thinking 2-4l ones.

    I'd also love to store some in a mini ex-bourbon/whiskey wooden keg, but not sure where to find these and assume I'd have to toast them first.

    Cheers
  • Thorbz 6 Mar 2018 18:46:05 128 posts
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    1) No, they have a lining which prevents any leeching from the metal.
    2) It's the same as the store bought kegs, so you need to consume within about three days. Before opening, it should be as long lasting as a bottle.
    3) Clean after use, dry inverted, sanitize before use, prime ( about 12g of sugar is enough ) and syphon beer on top, leaving about an inch of headroom.
    4) Same as a store bought keg.
    5) Most of the mini kegs are 5L. I'm (re)using an Adnams "Mosaic" keg, although homebrew stores sell 5L kegs for under a tenner. One useful thing to have is a cheapo Chinese endoscope to examine the inside of the keg for damage to the lining.

    Rather than getting a wooden keg, buy some oak chips and soak them in whiskey. Add the chips after primary fermentation, and keep tasting the beer until you get the desired flavour ( some people also add the steeping whiskey as well ).

    For a guide to keg use .
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