Migraine Page 2

  • thrawn 23 Oct 2008 09:46:39 899 posts
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    I started getting them when I was about 17 or 18. Would get one once a week like clockwork. Last for a couple of years and then suddenly stopped. I now get them about once a year, but never as bad as when I was a teenager.

    No confirmed ideas about why it started or why it stopped, although looking back it does seem to tie up with my heavy drinking/bad eating phase. Maybe your little 'un needs to lay off the booze? ;)

    Seriously though, I can only really echo what's already been said. Whenever I felt one coming on I'd head straight to bed, curtains closed, cold flannel over my face. If I could get to sleep in time I'd be ok. If not, there'd be incredible pain and vomiting.

    Hope you figure it out. They were hard enough to deal with as a teenager. I can only imagine how scary it must be as a 6 year old.
  • wellsie 23 Oct 2008 12:31:55 87 posts
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    My Ex gets them weekly with all the vomiting, pain, and light, sound ssensitivity. She just has to sit in a dark room fill herself full of pain killers and try and sleep. She gets it the worst with a bang on the head. Went on a fair ground ride once and banged her head. Sick all over and she passed out from the pain. Not nice
  • warlockuk 23 Oct 2008 14:05:21 19,498 posts
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    Chopsen wrote:
    Wow, lots of people here had migraines as children. Far more than I'd expect given how many children with migraines I see.

    /pens paper relating interest in gaming with childhood migraine

    Oh allergies aren't anything to do with migraines afik. People tend to attribute everything to allergies these days.
    Mine weren't down to games. I had 'em before we got our first computer in 1982 :p
  • Menace 23 Oct 2008 14:21:28 5,887 posts
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    Did a little research and it seems about 10% of all kids get it. I had no idea it was that common.

    Cheers for all the feedback, much appreciated!
  • speedjack 23 Oct 2008 14:48:52 628 posts
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    Does it effect his vision at all ?

    I've been suffering with chronic optical migranes for the best part of 10 years now.

    They normally start with a flashing in the corner of my right eye, like someone has set off a flashbulb. Over the space of 10-15 mins the flashing area gets slowly bigger until it covers both eyes. At its most intense I can see flashing, and weird shapes, like thousands of hexigons/triangles and I'm virtually blind.

    After about an hour it subsides but I'm left feeling decidedly squeamish (no vomiting thankfully), and with a pain in the back of my skull like someone has hit me over the head with a mallet.

    This normally lasts a couple of days then subsides but if I cough afterwards the pain that shoots through my skull is incredible.It got so bad that I wound up getting a brain scan around 5 years ago - again (thankfully) normal.

    Triggers for some people are normally food : (cheese, red wine, chocolate, coffee) in my case coffee (or caffine) played a big part. As did stress or tiredness.

    I illiminated most caffine from my diet (harder than you think), and that made a huge difference, but I still get them.

    My advice would be keep a diary on what he is eating and try and identify a trigger. I had a friend who had similar problems and in her case the trigger was Chinese takeaways - apparently the MSG content in some Chinese food is known to do this in some people.

    I doubt this will eliminate the issue but it will help. Poor wee guy though. Six is awfully young. He has my sympathies.
  • boo 23 Oct 2008 14:59:55 13,605 posts
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    speedjack wrote:
    They normally start with a flashing in the corner of my right eye, like someone has set off a flashbulb. Over the space of 10-15 mins the flashing area gets slowly bigger until it covers both eyes. At its most intense I can see flashing, and weird shapes, like thousands of hexigons/triangles and I'm virtually blind.

    Crikey - I thought it was just me! Used to get them in my teens.

    I'd become aware of a sparkling spot (like sunlight on water), right at the point I was looking, so if I was trying to read, it was just big enough to blur the word I was trying to focus on.

    It would gradually move, over the course of an hour / 90 mins, to the right. As it disappeared out of my range of vision, it was sledgehammer to the head time!

    After a while, I realised that if I could get to sleep in that 'warning' period - usually two hours was enough - it would completely pass me by and I'd wake up feeling fine.

    I did grow out of them - 41 now, haven't had one since mid 20's.

    Hope your son doesn't have to put up with them for too long.
  • Jos 23 Oct 2008 15:13:36 712 posts
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    Sorry for your lad. Not nice.

    I started to get them early teens, and they got progressively more frequent and worse up till I was 20. I had a particularly bad attack (hospitalised with suspected meningitis or brain haemorrhage) and from that moment they became progressively less frequent and milder.

    15 years later and I still get them occasionally but usually pretty mild.

    I always found being left alone in the, as frequently mentioned above, dark and quiet room with a bucket to vomit into was the only "solution". As much as people wanted to comfort me I only ever wanted them to go away as the effort of dealing with them was unbearable.

    After the bad attack I did get some proper medicine but as one of the after effects was permanent thinning of the blood vessels in the brain it's not a long term solution. And they only give you three pills for that reason. There may well be better potions available now.

    Sometimes headache pills would work to minimise the effects if I took them early enough from the initial indications (the lights) but again prob not a good solution for your lad.

    Good luck with it.

    There are specialists for referrals and have you tried these guys?

    http://www.migraine.org.uk/
  • RetardStrong 23 Oct 2008 15:16:49 3,229 posts
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    boo wrote:
    speedjack wrote:
    They normally start with a flashing in the corner of my right eye, like someone has set off a flashbulb. Over the space of 10-15 mins the flashing area gets slowly bigger until it covers both eyes. At its most intense I can see flashing, and weird shapes, like thousands of hexigons/triangles and I'm virtually blind.

    Crikey - I thought it was just me! Used to get them in my teens.

    I'd become aware of a sparkling spot (like sunlight on water), right at the point I was looking, so if I was trying to read, it was just big enough to blur the word I was trying to focus on.

    It would gradually move, over the course of an hour / 90 mins, to the right. As it disappeared out of my range of vision, it was sledgehammer to the head time!

    After a while, I realised that if I could get to sleep in that 'warning' period - usually two hours was enough - it would completely pass me by and I'd wake up feeling fine.

    I did grow out of them - 41 now, haven't had one since mid 20's.

    Hope your son doesn't have to put up with them for too long.

    Gah that's what I have, luckily I only get them 2 or 3 times a year. Had one a few weeks ago, at work, really sucked and I'm not the one to complain quickley, so I kept my mouth shut and felt miserable.
  • angeltreats 22 May 2010 15:38:30 2,601 posts
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    Sigh... ever since I posted in this thread a few years ago, I've had a few migraines and I can't work out what the trigger is. I woke up with one this morning that I actually thought was a hangover. It was only when my balance started to go and the headache shifted to one side that I realised it had been the start of a migraine. Luckily this was quite a short one (normally they last a full day) but I've been as sick as a dog and I have a BBQ to go to this afternoon while still suffering the post-migraine fuzzies.

    Does anyone else get that, btw? The awful fuzzy-headedness that feels like you're doing everything in slow motion and your brain isn't really working properly?
  • Menace 22 May 2010 16:18:19 5,887 posts
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    I Hope you find the trigger and get well! =/
  • faux-C 22 May 2010 16:49:52 11,204 posts
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    I've broken numerous bones and amputated the end of one of my fingers, but none of those things compare to the pain of a migraine.

    You should read this - it's great for people who don't have them to really understand what it's like.
  • faux-C 22 May 2010 16:51:17 11,204 posts
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    angeltreats wrote:
    Does anyone else get that, btw? The awful fuzzy-headedness that feels like you're doing everything in slow motion and your brain isn't really working properly?

    Definitely - even after the pain is over I'm normally knocked sideways for at least 48 hours.
  • effinjamie 22 May 2010 17:01:26 994 posts
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    does he get an aura or any other warnings before the onset?
    If so it's essential to get some painkillers into him then, before the onset of the Headache. I always find this makes it a lot more bearable.
    I've tried all sorts of relief including the new Triptan based medication (8 for 2 tablets)
    but found the more I used these the less effective they became, plus as your not supposed to take these until the headache has kicked in, if they don't work you've left yourself open to one hell of an attack.
    I stick with Ibubrofen and 500mg Paracetemol, taken together.

    I get the after headache fuzzy's as well, usually last for a few days were I feel a bit "Floaty"
  • mrharvest 22 May 2010 17:35:51 5,599 posts
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    I used to suffer from regular migraines. Now I only get them fairly rarely. I've managed to work out that for me they are never down to one triggering factor but a combination of several. I'll get a migraine if out of this list three or more conditions are met:
    *my glasses are dirty or I have dirt in my eyes
    *not enough carbohydrates or eating too greasy foods
    *muscle tension, usually due to stress
    *particular strong smells, such as perfume
    *continuous, loud sounds

    The first two are easy to avoid, so I don't get them that often. Stir-frying especially seems to trigger my migraine unless I'm careful. If I do get a migraine I've noticed lying down in a hot shower helps better than just lying down in a dark room.
  • Fake_Blood 22 May 2010 18:27:25 10,442 posts
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    I've had migraines all my life, I'm 28 now and the only thing that still works for me are opiates :/
  • Dougs 22 May 2010 18:33:12 94,595 posts
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    I was normally completely wiped out, absolutely drained. Couldn't do much and felt very spaced out. Thank fuck I've grown out of them, largely.
  • One_Vurfed_Gwrx 22 May 2010 20:01:06 3,953 posts
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    I used to get severe ones in childhood (maybe 6- 13 sort of agespan) with vomiting, blindness, etc (although my blindness was more of a painful blurriness where you could feel your eyeballs pounding painfully too) but they never managed to come up with a trigger or cure. It got better in adulthood so that although I still get migraines they aren't as severe (I don't get the nausea any more) but the blurred vision/sore eyes is always a hint that it's going to get severe so I stop what I'm doing and get into natural light and fresh air as soon as possible. One trigger I have noticed in adult life is fluorescent bulbs (including energy saving bulbs) as it seems teh flickering really increases my chances of getting one (probably along with some other factor). Unfortunately the obsession with energy-saving makes the situation a lot more difficult in many ways. I get headaches often, sometimes for many days a t a time, but I'm used to them so just zone them out unless I feel the extra symptoms such as the eyes. But the adult versions are a lot easier than the childhood ones were in my experience.
  • Lukey__b 23 May 2010 10:26:48 3,716 posts
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    Mr Harvest wrote:
    I used to suffer from regular migraines. Now I only get them fairly rarely. I've managed to work out that for me they are never down to one triggering factor but a combination of several. I'll get a migraine if out of this list three or more conditions are met:
    *my glasses are dirty or I have dirt in my eyes
    *not enough carbohydrates or eating too greasy foods
    *muscle tension, usually due to stress
    *particular strong smells, such as perfume
    *continuous, loud sounds

    The first two are easy to avoid, so I don't get them that often. Stir-frying especially seems to trigger my migraine unless I'm careful. If I do get a migraine I've noticed lying down in a hot shower helps better than just lying down in a dark room.

    Those sound like the accompanying symptoms to a migraine i.e. you tense up, notice smells and sounds more when getting a migraine. Of course, they may be your triggers as well, but it sounds like something which is part of your migraine experience.

    I wouldn't say I get migraines - that would be insulting to you guys that do, mine are no where near as disabling as yours - but I do get severe headaches and nausea if I am in a room that has very little/no natural light and fluorescent lighting. I noticed it in college and actually had to drop out as they would not accomodate me.
  • heyyo 23 May 2010 10:54:15 14,356 posts
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    I've only had one migraine (at least I think it was) I thought I had needles in my brain. It was a couple of years back, I was boxing sparring - was supposed to be fun, our first time in a real boxing ring etc etc - and my dickhead mate got too excited and punched me fucking hard and he knocked me unconscious.

    The next day, it was snowing - I wake up feeling fuzzy but decided to go to the corner shop anyway, I step outside and woosh and I slipped on ice landed on my arse (thankfully not my head!!).

    However, I jolted my head and man, my mind gave up. I got the worse headache of my life, my vision was tunneling out and I crawled back inside. My housemate was having tonsils removed so had some Morphine to hand, took some and fell asleep. Woke up and the pain was immense.

    There is a slight bit of lasting damage (minor anterograde amnesia, it doesn't affect me too much I forget things like people forget things day to day, but neurotypical people can recall stuff if they actively tried whereas I can recall that same memory with about 70% chance of sucess as opposed to 100%) because the doctors tell me getting concussed twice in quick succession is about the worst non-fatal thing that happen to a person - anyway my point is, I guess the head pain I felt was slightly above that of a Migraine but shit, if I felt head pain anywhere near what I felt again it would leave me in tears I couldn't imagine having pain like that 2 or 3 times a year.

    It really pisses me off when people wake up hungover and it;s "ohh I have a migraine ohhh" - no my friend, you don't.
  • angeltreats 23 May 2010 11:02:35 2,601 posts
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    heyyo! wrote:

    It really pisses me off when people wake up hungover and it;s "ohh I have a migraine ohhh" - no my friend, you don't.


    That wasn't aimed at me, was it??

    It does piss me off when people have a headache and claim to have a migraine. Usually while they're still sitting at their desks at work, functioning normally.
  • Lukey__b 23 May 2010 11:14:17 3,716 posts
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    I've had some sort of aneurysm when at the gym before. That is the worst pain I think I've ever had.

    Fuck... just had a google to see what an aneurysm specifically entails. I thought I was exagerating but it seems I might of actually had one. That's a little worrying.
  • heyyo 23 May 2010 11:23:20 14,356 posts
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    angeltreats wrote:
    heyyo! wrote:

    It really pisses me off when people wake up hungover and it;s "ohh I have a migraine ohhh" - no my friend, you don't.


    That wasn't aimed at me, was it??

    It does piss me off when people have a headache and claim to have a migraine. Usually while they're still sitting at their desks at work, functioning normally.

    No, I didn't see what you posted I only read the post immediately above the one I posted :)
  • Blakester 24 May 2010 17:02:08 4,999 posts
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    I've been a migraine sufferer since I was in my early teens. It's a hereditary illness, so in my case passed down on my mother's side.

    The most important thing to acknowledge is that it's an illness, NOT a headache. Migraine sufferers the world over despair at normal folk claiming a bad headache is a migraine.
    As an illness, it needs to be treated properly, and the causes carefully diagnosed. Unfortunately migraine is also a very personal experience, so one type of medication might not be effective for each sufferer.

    In my case, my migraine were much stronger when I was younger. The warning signs preceding an attack (aura in one eye) were more vivid, and the pain that followed resulted in severe nausea and sickness. Typically an attack would last up to 12 hours, and occur every 3 months or so.

    Now as a guy in my mid thirties, the attacks are far less frequent (I make provisions for 1 a year) and thankfully much less intense. I still get the aura, but the pain lasts only 3-4 hours and I'm mobile again.

    The best possible advise I could give anyone who has just started suffering from them is:

    1) Try and embrace the fact that you are a sufferer. There is no miracle cure, and medication in most cases will only help reduce the pain, not remove it completely.
    2) If at work or school, ensure that everyone around you knows you are a sufferer. Don't add to your stress by worrying about having to go home to recover.
    3) Try to act as quickly as possible when you get your personal warning sign. Taking medication immediately can really help reduce the pain.
    4) My personal tip is to get a bowl of water and fill it with ice cubes and dip in a flannel or cloth. Wring out and place it on your forehead while you lie in a cool dark room. To help distract you from the pain, put on a favourite movie that you can listen to (I find The Empire Strikes Back a great help)
  • th3duckst3r 24 May 2010 21:45:33 16 posts
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    not nice migraines.
    and alot of people dont understand them.i suffered for years with them.
    it was just like someone sawing my head open with a saw.they would move about. left to right.there worse wen u dont want to sleep,but u need to to get rid of em.i suggest migraleve tablets.they worked for me ,the ones that suffer from them will know wen there gunna get one.take a couple of these tablets and they will shift it.i dont often get them now .i started to get them wen i was 16.im now 40,and for past 18 months theve been more of a bad headache rather than a full blown migraine.ive started to where glasses.i think this has helped also.i simpethise will all concerned here.not sure what others suffered but they made me throw up.and ill have to be crued here made me shit like a donkey.it was as if everything inside wanted to get out and quickly.i also find and u may think im being daft but im not.i find i usually get headaches when there is a change in the atomospheric pressure.ie if its been warm then suddenly gets cold then i seem to suffer with headaches.as of tday 24/5/2010 its been hot over the uk weekend been cooler tday ,i bet my last pound if it gets colder ill get headache.its the pressure change.but i do swear by those migraleve then in pink packets only at chemists.not cheap maybe 6 per 10.how they works is they stop the pain at your neck thus preventing any pain traveling to your brain.longest attack i had was for 3 days.thats how long i spent in bed.and yes they are hereditary,my mother suffers from them.although neither of my sisters do.they just suffer from being fat lol...
  • localnotail 24 May 2010 22:16:12 23,072 posts
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    I had them bad in my teens and 20s, less so now. Had one the other week, woke up about 6AM with the light flashes, pain, nausea and noise sensitivity. Just lay in as much dark and quiet as I could get for about 5 hours 'til it started to fade off. The noise-sensitivity stays the longest for me, I can usually read / watch tv with the sound low after about 4-5 hours if I take the right medicine.

    I take a massive dose of aspirin (1g) when I get them but you can't give your son that if I remember rightly, due to Reyes Syndrome. I hope you find the help you need, poor lad :(
  • TenMinJoe 26 May 2010 13:46:26 82 posts
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    I get "visual migraines" - just weird visual effects ("aura") and the nausea, but no searing pain (phew).

    The trick seems to be, as soon as the aura starts, take painkillers and go to bed. Then I wake up a few hours later and it's over. If the OP's son is able to identify the aura (very common with migraines as I understand it) that might help a lot, because it's like an early warning system.
  • ZuluHero 26 May 2010 14:05:32 8,925 posts
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    I guess i've been lucky as i've only had one migraine my entire life (when i was 15). I have other not so fun problems though, so it probably evens out... :S

    I feel really sorry for the OP's son though - i really hope he gets better soon!
  • L_Franko Moderator 27 May 2010 14:01:59 9,695 posts
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    speedjack wrote:
    Does it effect his vision at all ?

    I've been suffering with chronic optical migranes for the best part of 10 years now.

    They normally start with a flashing in the corner of my right eye, like someone has set off a flashbulb. Over the space of 10-15 mins the flashing area gets slowly bigger until it covers both eyes. At its most intense I can see flashing, and weird shapes, like thousands of hexigons/triangles and I'm virtually blind.



    This is exactly the same as what I suffer from. Nice to know i'm not alone in this. Been happening for about 8 years or so for me.
  • Deleted user 27 May 2010 14:13:37
    I get migraines now and then.

    I never had them in my early life and it wasnt until my 30's before I got my first. That might have been to do with a motorbike accident which left me a little paralysed down my right side or it might be the increasing stress of life. I suspect the latter.

    Anyway, in response to localnotail, one of the triggers for my attacks is atmospheric pressure changes. If the weather pattern changes significantly and we have a serious weather front go overhead, then I tend to get a migraine.

    My doctor has prescribed a few things for me and her current favourite is a very low dose of an anti-depressant. I take this now and then (mostly if I want a good night's sleep) and it seems to be fairly effective.
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