Rate the last book you read Page 79

  • simpleexplodingmaybe 22 Oct 2018 20:39:03 8,442 posts
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    Has anyone read Gaiman's Norse mythology book?

    I'd quite like an easy take on them to read since I'm not as familiar as I'd like to be but I'm a bit hot and cold on Gaiman and Good Reads is no good since he's got such a fandom style following
  • H1ggyLTD 22 Oct 2018 20:42:14 10,908 posts
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    I think i own it, but i've not read it.
  • kentmonkey 22 Oct 2018 21:02:39 22,763 posts
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    simpleexplodingmaybe wrote:
    Has anyone read Gaiman's Norse mythology book?

    I'd quite like an easy take on them to read since I'm not as familiar as I'd like to be but I'm a bit hot and cold on Gaiman and Good Reads is no good since he's got such a fandom style following
    I did. I wasn't a fan to be honest. And I usually like Gaiman (Ocean at the end of the lane I loved).
  • brokenkey 22 Oct 2018 21:26:12 10,006 posts
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    I thought it was quite enjoyable. Not a heavy read, almost childish, but that's the nature of the source material.
  • Tonka 23 Oct 2018 06:21:08 28,767 posts
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    I'll in the exact same situation as simple. Well, with the added layer of me thinking it weird to read Norse mythology in English rather than swedish.

    I understand Gaiman plays fast and loose with the source material.
  • Tonka 21 Nov 2018 06:58:09 28,767 posts
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    New York 2140 by Kim Stanley Robinson

    FAN!TASTIC!

    I'm a massive KSR fanboi and this book just propelled my fanboism into orbit around the center of the universe.

    NY2140 is set after the sea levels have risen enough to flood all coastal cities on the planet. Large mammals are going extinct and life should be shit. Yet KSR manages to build a world to long for. This is a possible postapocalyptic future that gives hope.

    The story is a mishmash of things and characters and styles, it's a bit like Gossford Park wrt characters and plot. It centers on some of the residents in a building in the flooded New York (or Super Venice as they constantly refer to it) and it's just so damn good. It's alos about how big moey has been fucking us over for centuries and what to do about it.

    A must read
  • Mola_Ram 21 Nov 2018 07:26:11 18,925 posts
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    I just shelved that today at the library, and was intrigued. Is it necessary to have read any of Kim Stanley Robinson's other novels in order to understand it? Or is it standalone?
  • PazJohnMitch 21 Nov 2018 07:57:45 13,987 posts
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    American Gods

    My first Gaiman book. It was very good but took me much longer to get through than usual. I always enjoyed reading it but for some reason it never motivated me to pick it up more regularly.
  • Tonka 21 Nov 2018 09:16:21 28,767 posts
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    @Mola_Ram

    Stand alone. No need to have read any of his other books but they do feel "spiritually connected". They all share the same mix of "Earth has gone to hell due to greed" and "OMG huge epic possibilities because of big engineering"

    This, The Mars trilogy, 2312 and Galileo's Dream all give me a headrush from being so big in their visions of humanities future. It's like breathing pure oxygen at the top of a mountain.
  • rice_sandwich 23 Nov 2018 08:37:19 4,910 posts
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    The Hidden Pleasures of Life by Theodore Zeldin. A very readable collection of essays that asks meaningful questions such as 'How can people lose their illusions about themselves', 'What can the rich/poor tell the poor/rich', 'How can a religion change', and a whole bunch of other stuff that is relevant to everyday life.

    Food for thought on a wide range of topics where the author looks at how various people and societies have lived in the past and how it relates to current morals, cultural concerns and circumstances. I liked that it can be read in any order and that the header of every page has a sentence that summarises it and asks more questions.

    All in all it seems that the main concerns of humans have not changed over the course of recorded history, and that valuing family and cultivating respect and appreciation of our true selves in relationships is what really matters. Recommended.
  • GoatApocalypse 23 Nov 2018 11:03:07 4,941 posts
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    @rice_sandwich

    That sounds great, have picked it up.
  • H1ggyLTD 23 Nov 2018 11:11:25 10,908 posts
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    Dr Sleep

    Decent.
  • rice_sandwich 23 Nov 2018 11:27:43 4,910 posts
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    @GoatApocalypse

    It's a good book. The essays are short so don't delve too deeply into things but it provides enough to get you thinking and read more deeply on the topics covered.
  • spindle9988 23 Nov 2018 12:26:50 4,799 posts
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    Tonka wrote:
    @Mola_Ram

    Stand alone. No need to have read any of his other books but they do feel "spiritually connected". They all share the same mix of "Earth has gone to hell due to greed" and "OMG huge epic possibilities because of big engineering"

    This, The Mars trilogy, 2312 and Galileo's Dream all give me a headrush from being so big in their visions of humanities future. It's like breathing pure oxygen at the top of a mountain.
    If it wasn't for this great thread, I wouldn't have read half the books that I have.
    Great review and once I've finished the Hyperion books this will be my next read
  • Tonka 23 Nov 2018 17:02:25 28,767 posts
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    The amount of recommendations I've got from EG over the years .. on so many different topics.

    The gift that keeps giving
  • Roddy100 24 Nov 2018 21:23:40 1,000 posts
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    Disappearance at Devil's Rock by Paul Tremblay.

    I loved A Head Full Of Ghosts so was keen to read more from this author.

    This one has mixed reviews but I really enjoyed it despite its bleakness. A missing teen story that teases ambiguous supernatural factors. Disturbing in parts and definitely not a feel good story, but compelling nonetheless.

    If you're interested though, be wary of the Kobo edition. It has scanned, vitally important diary segments that are nigh impossible to read on an e-reader. Thankfully, these can also be found on the author's blog, which was how I was able to read them.
  • Alastair 26 Nov 2018 12:06:27 22,853 posts
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    I finished The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (Agatha Christie) over the weekend.
    If you've ever enjoyed Poirot on the telly, or a murder mystery then you owe it to yourself to read it. I don't want to say too much for fear of giving away any clues, but it has a great twist.
    Recommended.
  • RichDC 6 Dec 2018 11:49:53 7,990 posts
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    James O'Brien - How to be right in a world gone wrong

    An enjoyable book from radio talk show host James O'Brien as he picks apart topics such as racism, political correctness and Trump. The problem with the book is, though its entertaining I don't think I learnt anything as I already listen to J O'B a lot and have heard it all before. The people who need to read it the most are the ones who never will.

    7/10
  • Mola_Ram 6 Dec 2018 12:06:08 18,925 posts
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    I'm reading the Dark Tower series again.

    The Gunslinger

    It still holds up, but still feels like more of a prototype for later, better novels, rather than something that can stand on its own. It's worthwhile for developing the relationship between Roland and Jake, but there's really not much else to it.

    I do like how there are hints as to where the series is going to end up, though. That's the sort of thing you only notice on a reread (unless King included them as part of the edits he made 15 years ago, I'm not sure).

    6.6/10
  • smoothpete 6 Dec 2018 14:28:52 35,168 posts
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    I just finished The Continental Op by Dashiell Hammett, which I really enjoyed. Any other authors I should look at in a similar vein? I've read most of Raymond Chandler.
  • glaeken 6 Dec 2018 14:53:16 11,953 posts
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    James M. Cain maybe? I have only read one of theirs but it's certainly in a similar vein.
  • whatfruitlivesagain 6 Dec 2018 15:17:36 1,443 posts
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    Bloody Rose by Nicholas Eames.

    The sort of sequel to one of the most refreshing fantasy books of last year Kings of The Wyld. Bloody Rose proves that Eames's debut Kings of the Wyld was not a fluke. Uses a blend of humour of the modern world and fairy tales held up to a twisted mirror of Terry Pratchett with the swashbuckling action and savage violence of Joe Abercrombie.
  • Salaman 6 Dec 2018 15:30:27 23,334 posts
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    Lethal White (Cormoran Strike, #4) by J.K. Galbraith

    I always seem to romp through these in a matter of days, highly enjoying them, without retaining all that much about the story after I completed it.
    Highly recommended if you read and enjoyed the first 3. Otherwise, maybe go check out the first book in the series and take it from there.
  • glaeken 11 Dec 2018 09:12:36 11,953 posts
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    American gods - 6/10 - It was Ok but I never felt very engaged with it. I liked the general concept but just found the execution fairly pedestrian. It never really grabbed me. My favourite bit actually ended up being the side story that was Lakeside.
  • Mola_Ram 11 Dec 2018 09:20:43 18,925 posts
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    Second Dark Tower book...

    The Drawing of the Three

    This is more like it. I like The Gunslinger in its own way, but this is where the plot really starts to move. And I love the structure of it - I think King often has a problem letting the story get away from him, but this feels a lot tighter. You get in the head of a few characters, gather the crew, and then it ends with the promise of more adventure.

    I remember this being my favourites of the books the first time around. I don't know if I'll still feel that way, but even so it's an easy 9/10.
  • JoelStinty 11 Dec 2018 09:38:39 7,011 posts
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    glaeken wrote:
    American gods - 6/10 - It was Ok but I never felt very engaged with it. I liked the general concept but just found the execution fairly pedestrian. It never really grabbed me. My favourite bit actually ended up being the side story that was Lakeside.
    I think i agree with you, the middle just sagged too much for me. The road trip element wasn't that interesting beyond its concept. It might be one that reveals something on a second read through. I read Stardust the other day. I read it in a day, theres no space wasted, yet American gods feels quite stodgy in places.
  • Rogueywon Most Generous Forumite, 2016 11 Dec 2018 09:45:30 4,679 posts
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    @Mola_Ram Ah... the Dark Tower. Now there's a series with some real peaks and troughs. I've read it a couple of times (initially while the books were still being released, then a re-read of the whole series in early 2017).

    Huge, sprawling, ambitious, frequently messy and very clearly a labour of love for King rather than something intended as a purely commercial work. I think I'd rank 3-5 as the strongest installments. 1-2 feel a bit immature. 6 is a mess. And 7... there's a lot to like about 7, but my word it takes its time. I checked and in word-count terms, book 7 alone is not all that far short of the length of the entire Lord of the Rings trilogy.
  • CosmicFuzz 11 Dec 2018 09:46:27 32,483 posts
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    Yeah I felt something similar with American Gods. Middle part was a bit of a slog. Definitely not my favourite of his, although it does seem to be loved by loads. It actually put me of watching the show.
  • glaeken 11 Dec 2018 09:51:22 11,953 posts
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    Indeed knowing the conclusion it would put me off the show as I don't think it really goes anywhere that interesting. I get the gist of the ending but it's also fairly vague how it all would have worked in the way Odin planned it would. It was not a satisfying conclusion to the story. The Lakeside side story for comparison I thought had a better conclusion regarding the mystery of the disappearing children. I was far more engaged in that story line than the main story line

    Edited by glaeken at 09:52:03 11-12-2018
  • Mola_Ram 11 Dec 2018 09:58:35 18,925 posts
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    @Rogueywon

    I actually really like the first one because it really develops the Roland/Jake relationship, but I agree that it's pretty messy. Messy the whole way through, really. And I'm still torn about whether certain developments later on are the height of genius, the height of arrogance, or both. I'll be interested to see how I view it now.

    Anyway, overall I love it with all its flaws. I'm gutted that the movie was such an artistic and commercial failure, because you really could make a fantastic movie (or TV) series out of it.

    Edited by Mola_Ram at 09:59:05 11-12-2018
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