Rate the last book you read Page 80

  • Alastair 11 Dec 2018 10:02:42 23,311 posts
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    @whatfruitlivesagain Just bought Kings of the Wyld on Kindle, based on your description.
    I enjoyed the Joe Abercrombie series that I read... Hmmm, can't remember the name. Last Argument of Kings was the third book. The Blade Itself might be the first one..?
  • CosmicFuzz 11 Dec 2018 11:08:43 32,585 posts
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    I recently finished reading through the entire Dark Tower series a few months ago. I really enjoyed them all, for the most part. I really didn't get on with Wizard and Glass, although I know that's some people's favourite. Just seemed far too overwritten and didn't advance the overall narrative (I appreciate that was the point, somewhat!).

    The later bits are rather mental in terms of how meta it gets, but I think I actually rather enjoyed them. It certainly made the series into something very different than what I was expecting, rather than just another bunch of fantasy books. I know what you mean about arrogance, though. I still go back and forth on it a little in that respect!
  • JoelStinty 11 Dec 2018 11:48:29 7,594 posts
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    Going away for a couple of months, away from most distractions (still had netflix on my phone) i really got back into reading. Went to Waterstones the other day and came back out with a nice stack of books to read. I actually forgot to buy the books i went in for!

    Currently reading Knausgaard's second book in his my struggle collection which is fantastic. The first book was tortured , this second book so far is actually underneath the existentialism quite optimistic and hopeful. There are moments of pure joy when he talks about his daughters for example. He is a really talented writer. There have been a couple of ideas i didn't quite understand in some of his musings, but really enjoying it.

    Edited by JoelStinty at 11:49:26 11-12-2018
  • Tonka 11 Dec 2018 13:15:14 29,322 posts
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    I once saw Knausgård in my local shoppingmall.

    Talk about tortured...
  • CrispyLog 17 Dec 2018 16:27:07 125 posts
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    whatfruitlivesagain wrote:
    Bloody Rose by Nicholas Eames.

    The sort of sequel to one of the most refreshing fantasy books of last year Kings of The Wyld. Bloody Rose proves that Eames's debut Kings of the Wyld was not a fluke. Uses a blend of humour of the modern world and fairy tales held up to a twisted mirror of Terry Pratchett with the swashbuckling action and savage violence of Joe Abercrombie.

    Shit, did not realise that was out already! I bloody loved the first book, just felt like a really fun adventure.
  • Mola_Ram 24 Dec 2018 00:26:58 19,495 posts
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    The Wasteland

    Dark Tower the third. It has some good sequences in it (Eddie and the bear, Jake getting attacked by the plaster man, the Lud chase), but it feels like the season finale of a TV show. The two books before this one actually had beginnings, middles and ends, but this one just... finishes. On a cliffhanger no less. I don't really mind that much, but it contributes to...

    Wizard and Glass

    ...the next book, which doesn't have much of a beginning to speak of. The cliffhanger is neatly resolved, some other things happen, and then you get into the flashback.

    I found the flashback more interesting here than I did the first time around, probably because I'm now less impatient for the main story to get going. And I liked the new characters - I'd love to see some more adventures with Cuthbert and co.

    On the other hand, there was a bit more cringe this time around, particularly when King starts describing anything to do with sex and/or vaginas. Thanks buddy, but I don't really need for you to describe the heat and wetness between a hundred-year-old old woman's legs when she touches a crystal ball, or how a 16-year-old girl tweaked her nips and diddled her clit all night while thinking of Roland. It's just so, so very bad.

    Still good though, overall.

    8/10
  • CosmicFuzz 24 Dec 2018 00:29:06 32,585 posts
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    Haha, yeah I remember the sexy bit with the old woman being a bit o_O
  • Mola_Ram 24 Dec 2018 00:40:04 19,495 posts
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    It wouldn't have been so bad if it was just a one-off sentence here and there. But he keeps. Going. Back. To. It. Like he can't help himself or something. It's like a Mills and Boon romance at times.

    But I guess there's enough terrible sex in his other books, that I just kind of expect this from him now. I just imagine Eddie and Jake sitting there listening to the stuff about the old lady's wet caverns or whatever, being at least as weirded out as I was.

    Edited by Mola_Ram at 09:12:48 28-12-2018
  • Mola_Ram 9 Jan 2019 12:16:14 19,495 posts
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    And now number 5...

    The Dark Tower: Wolves of the Calla

    In which Stephen King begins to panic, wondering how on earth he's going to get this thing finished.

    Look, it's not terrible or anything, but it feels bloated and scattershot in a way that previous volumes did not (well, Wizard and Glass kind of did, but not to this extent). The main plot has a lot of buildup and is over far too quickly. None of the twists really land, and the last one is either genius or jumping the shark - I'll decide after I read the next book.

    And I wish everyone (Eddie in particular) would just fucking shut up about the number 19. I GET IT, 19 IS EVERYWHERE. It was neat when they had it in the first book, but now it's almost as irritating as the numbers in Lost.

    ...even mediocre King is still pretty good though, so

    6.48/10 (look, all the numbers add up to 19 HOW FUCKED IS THAT WOOOOAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH)
  • glaeken 9 Jan 2019 12:49:38 12,003 posts
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    simpleexplodingmaybe wrote:
    Has anyone read Gaiman's Norse mythology book?

    I'd quite like an easy take on them to read since I'm not as familiar as I'd like to be but I'm a bit hot and cold on Gaiman and Good Reads is no good since he's got such a fandom style following
    Just finished this and honestly I was pretty underwhelmed. The tales feel very light weight and none of them are very engaging. By the time I finished it I was glad its actually a pretty short book.

    There is some slight interest seeing details for things you sort of know from the Marvel films. Virtually everything in the Marvel films is here just not quite the same.
  • JoelStinty 12 Jan 2019 20:45:12 7,594 posts
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    I really liked Norse Mythology. I like its incidental and campfire esq nature. Think Gaiman is at his best when he precise and to the point. He says a lot with little.

    Anyway, talking of brief and straight to the point, just rattled through On Tyranny: 20 Lessons from the Twentieth Century by Timothy Synder.

    It's a small primer (roughly 120 pages) on tyranny, there are 20 chapters, each titled something like 'Beware the One-Party State’, ‘Remember Professional Ethics’ and ‘Believe in Truth.’ they are a few pages each, all using examples to remind us how countries easily fall into tyranny's traps, as well as offering advice on what we can do now to stop us repeating past mistakes.

    Maybe for history aficionado's there is little here that is new, but as a guide its fantastic. Brief, sharp and a good way to remind you how Fascism etc works and the importance of things such as a free media, institutions and smaller ideas such as community and professional practice is in resisting to those evils.

    Worth picking up even if it is written by an American for Americans.

    Edited by JoelStinty at 20:48:21 12-01-2019
  • senso-ji 24 Jan 2019 14:18:58 9,253 posts
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    Ancillary Justice - Ann Leckie

    Always wanted to read this and I have to say I was slightly disappointed by the end. The story is good and the characters are very well drawn, but the pacing is inconsistent, the final third really feels like a slog and the ending was just filler to get you to read the next one in the series.

    If this novel got all the sci-fi awards thrown at in in 2014, then I question the overall quality of published speculative fiction that year.

    7/10
  • Tonka 24 Jan 2019 15:10:57 29,322 posts
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    A Hero Born by Jin Yong

    Apparently this "wirefu in a book" carries the same popcultural weight in China as Star Wars and Harry Potter combined.

    I guess it's unfair to call it wirefu in a book since it's the book that started the wirefu genre.

    It's interesting from that perspective but not a particularly good book.

    Anyone mildly interested can watch this TV adaptation for five minutes. If that looks like something you'd like to read... then do

    https://youtu.be/hc6GXfO8Uuc?t=139

    Edited by Tonka at 06:53:01 31-01-2019
  • Mola_Ram 29 Jan 2019 04:47:57 19,495 posts
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    Dark Tower 6: Song of Susannah

    This is it. This is the one where Stephen King inserts himself not only as a character into his own book, but as one of the linchpins holding the whole universe together. While it is I guess fitting in a way, it is also slightly arrogant. But more than that it feels desperate, like he had no idea where to go with the story and decided instead to navel-gaze into the abyss of meta. A cliche doesn't suddenly become not one, just because you ironically draw attention to it and say "hey, isn't this a bit of a cliche?"

    Anyway, I wouldn't really mind if the rest of the book moved along at a faster clip. But it drags, even though it's possibly the shortest book in the whole series. It's like he wanted to remove all the filler from one of his more bloated entries, but accidentally removed everything else instead.

    It's probably my least favourite so far. But it's still pretty weird and ballsy, which I do respect in a way.

    6.1/10

    Edited by Mola_Ram at 04:49:37 29-01-2019
  • dmj 29 Jan 2019 09:17:51 977 posts
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    A Legacy of Spies - John le Carré

    A re-examination (kinda) of The Spy Who Came in from the Cold, but just as compelling as most of his stuff. Some trick to make you think differently about a much earlier novel without resorting to massive retcons and/or ridiculous twists.

    Can't see myself returning to it like some of his other novels, but absolutely worth it.

    8/10

    Currently re-reading Witches Abroad for the umpteenth time. 9/10

    Edited by DMJ at 09:21:28 29-01-2019
  • CosmicFuzz 29 Jan 2019 09:29:01 32,585 posts
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    senso-ji wrote:
    Ancillary Justice - Ann Leckie

    Always wanted to read this and I have to say I was slightly disappointed by the end. The story is good and the characters are very well drawn, but the pacing is inconsistent, the final third really feels like a slog and the ending was just filler to get you to read the next one in the series.

    If this novel got all the sci-fi awards thrown at in in 2014, then I question the overall quality of published speculative fiction that year.

    7/10
    Yeah I read this a while back, struggled to connect with it at all tbh. Did finish it but have no intention of reading the next ones. Like you, it was all the sci-fi awards it won that caught my attention, but I really had to push myself to finish it by the end. Just got the impression the author thought her ideas were much more impressive than they actually were.

    Edited by CosmicFuzz at 09:29:32 29-01-2019
  • Tonka 31 Jan 2019 06:50:30 29,322 posts
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    I really liked the entire Ancillary series. Well, there was a weird Jane Austen like section in one of them that was... weird.

    I think what hooked me was the initial puzzel of trying to work out what the fuck was going on (something I've grown increasingly tired of in other books though). But it's mainly the world building that fascinates me.

    Speaking of... Has anyone read Shadow Captain? The follow up to Alastair Reynolds Revenger, which has an amazing world, and a shit ending like most of his stuff.
  • smoothpete 31 Jan 2019 07:13:41 35,580 posts
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    I’m ploughing steadily through Raymond Chandler’s Marlowe novels and enjoying them a lot, much much more than when I tried to get into them a few years ago. Just finished The Long Goodbye which is probably my favourite so far.
  • glaeken 31 Jan 2019 09:23:24 12,003 posts
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    That means you have Playback to go. That's easily the worst one of the series. Chandler had quite a break from The Long Goodbye until they wrote Playback and it's not up to the level of the other books. Go in with low expectations.
  • smoothpete 31 Jan 2019 09:46:14 35,580 posts
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    Yeah just started it. I feel like I might need a break from the genre though tbh. I was thinking of some sci fi next, maybe Charles Stross's Iron Sunrise (having enjoyed Singularity Sky, albeit many years ago)
  • effinjamie 1 Feb 2019 13:06:42 992 posts
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    @DMJ I agree, enjoyed it but I doubt I’ll read it again like the other smiley stories.

    If you liked this I’d highly recommend An Officer and a Spy by Robert Harris
  • Vortex808 1 Feb 2019 16:49:03 13,093 posts
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    smoothpete wrote:
    I’m ploughing steadily through Raymond Chandler’s Marlowe novels and enjoying them a lot, much much more than when I tried to get into them a few years ago. Just finished The Long Goodbye which is probably my favourite so far.
    You can't go wrong with them. I really enjoy them, the Mickey Spillane Mike Hammer ones and Dashiel Hammet's stories are all fun in their own ways. Part of me would quite like another LA Noire type game just to inhabit that world again.
  • dmj 1 Feb 2019 17:43:58 977 posts
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    @effinjamie Haven't read any Robert Harris for ages, but I'll stick it on my list.
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