Rate the last book you read Page 85

  • Deleted user 4 July 2019 14:51:06
    General_Martok wrote:
    AaronTurner wrote:
    I just finished children of time and man I absolutely loved it. It is epic sci-fi, horrific imagery and darkly comic all in one go. I don’t really want to say much because anything I write about the story would likely make people not want to read it - what I mean by that is that the story is absolutely mental and does require some suspension of disbelief, but it’s written in such a way that it’s utterly engrossing and convincing. Top marks 5/5. If you look it up I’d suggest not reading too much about it as from what I’ve seen a lot of reviews can give away some of the surprises, particularly early ones! I went into it knowing nothing aside from that it was a well liked sci-fi novel.
    The start of Children of time is amazing, the rest not so much but I did like the end....which is good seeing as there's a sequel: Children of Ruin. Haven't read that yet.
    I loved every bit of it, bought the sequel straight after finishing and started it right away. I can totally see that it could be a divisive book.
  • Deleted user 5 July 2019 15:49:37
    Gut - Gulia Enders

    Really good book about the operation of the gut and the latest research into gut health and function. I thought I knew a lot about the gut, but his taught me a lot more and I found it fascinating. Came away with lots of practical tips that I have been able to use in my diet and a far better understanding of the subject.

    So good that I've started listening to it again so that I can memorise it. I honesly think that this book should be required reading for most people as we never give our gut much of a thought, but its responsible for so much including our mood and our health.

    9/10
  • Deleted user 5 July 2019 16:25:22
    Break Point: Ollie Ollerton

    He came across as a guy who looked down with contempt on anyone with an ordinary job and who did the 9-5 and what they have to do to support a wife and family. At the same time he was recounting how much of a selfish, drunken screw up he was in his relationships and personal life and how it was just luck that he's got where he now is. Yes he was part of the SBS and is obviously fit and determined and can handle himself under pressure, but his opinion of the rest of us dull drones really grated. He also seems to think that the answer to life is by following the much ridiculed Secret (or visualisation as he calls it).

    Started off okay, but as it went on I liked the book and it's subject less and less. Last part of the book was clearly an advert for this new business (called Break Point) that he's started off the back of his success on TV. That eventually explained his use of the phrase for events he thought were significant in his life.


    Not a book for me at all.

    3/10
  • Tonka 8 Jul 2019 09:12:17 30,649 posts
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    Futuristic Violence and Fancy Suits by David Wong

    It's the guy who wrote the books the film John Dies at the End is based on, and that is why I bought it.

    It's the story about a girl from the trailer park that all of a sudden becomes a hot target for a sociopathic guy with cybernetic enhancements and a gang of loyal followers. When its good it's a funny cyberpunk homage. When it's bad it's an overlong, somewhat repetitive story that mixes in attempts at sharing words of wisdom among rape threats and futuristic violence.

    Not sure how to rate it. It's not bad but It could easily lose about 200 of its nearly 500 pages. Just like The Martian it does the "out of the ashes, into the fire" a few times to many for my liking. At the same time it manages to be funny and exciting every now and then.
  • dmj 8 Jul 2019 12:24:05 1,016 posts
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    The Dragon's Path - Daniel Abraham

    8/10

    Epic fantasy! With added... banking?

    I don't read a lot of epic fantasy these days, not really having the time (most of my reading time these days is done on the commute) and/or finding it all a bit samey, but this was great.

    There are five in the series. Started the second on Saturday night. Have the third ready to go. They're not doorstoppers either which is a refreshing change (the last two could be, but I've avoided checking to avoid catching any blurb spoilers), just well-paced, well-written fantasy.

    He's one half of James S.A. Corey too, though I've only read the first Expanse novel.
  • Tonka 8 Jul 2019 12:43:06 30,649 posts
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    Is he the half that insist on describing smells by combining two others?

    The spacesuit smelled of sulfur and strawberry. The hangar held the lingering smell of petrol and gunpowder. The café reeked of white wine and seaweed. Her hair smelled like sawdust and sunshine.
  • dmj 8 Jul 2019 12:54:23 1,016 posts
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    He does like to use reasonably short sentences, though I haven't noticed lots of smell-related passages, so possibly.
  • rice_sandwich 9 Jul 2019 07:42:49 6,426 posts
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    Erebus The Story of a Ship - Michael Palin

    A pacy and well researched book about the life and times of the ships Erebus and Terror, most famously known for their part in the Franklin expedition of the NW passage. Only about a third of the book covers the NW voyage, the rest being a look at various Artic and Antarctic voyages undertaken by said ships. Well worth reading for a good overview of 19th century British polar exploration.
  • JoelStinty 9 Jul 2019 09:33:48 8,798 posts
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    I brought that book for my old man for Fathers Day. I also kind of brought it to read after him so glad to read it is good!

    Both of us really enjoyed Scott’s journals and Cherry Garrards account of the Scott expedition so looking forward to this one!
  • rice_sandwich 9 Jul 2019 09:50:51 6,426 posts
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    @JoelStinty

    It's good as a broad survey. From looking at the bibliography there are many other books that deal with the NW passage voyage and rescue attempts in much more detail.

    I'd like to take a look at various historical documents, journals, newspapers etc. but don't know where to start looking. There's probably loads of digitised archives but it's hard to know where to start.
  • Murbs 9 Jul 2019 11:19:13 24,746 posts
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    @AaronTurner give Dogs if War a read by the same author. I'm a big fan of his. In fact, if you don't mind fantasy, I thought Spiderlight (yes, more spiders) was a great read too.
  • askew 13 Jul 2019 15:11:59 21,324 posts
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    I thought this would be the best place to mention it, but the author of the short story behind Arrival - Ted Chang - has had his new compilation published in the UK now: Exhalation. Excited to tuck in.

    Edited by askew at 15:12:08 13-07-2019
  • brokenkey 13 Jul 2019 18:02:27 10,471 posts
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    The Darkest Web, by Eileen Ormsby. A true-crime book covering the rise/fall/replacement of the Silk Road and drugs trading on the dark net, hitmen for hire and then a 3rd section I don't want to talk about.

    Very good read, apart from part 3 which wasn't a good read at all.
  • Deleted user 14 July 2019 22:15:27
    Red storm rising- Tom Clancy

    Second time I’ve read it with the first time being about thirty years ago. Still enjoyed it, but it is “of its time” and we now know that the Russian equipment wasn’t as good as we thought back then.

    Probably a third too long and goes on about submarines way way way too much, but still good. Overused the word “cringe” (anytime shells or missiles we’re inbound)which I didn’t notice first time round. Love interest was dull and the ending was kind of abrupt.

    T80/100

    Edited by GuybrushFreepwood at 22:16:39 14-07-2019
  • Tonka 1 Aug 2019 13:27:12 30,649 posts
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    The Word for World is Forrest by Ursula K Le Guin

    Superb take on the planet being colonized by industrial humans that treat the indigenous species as animals / slaves. More clear in who's the good guy and who's the bad guy than Ursulas other books but it's by no means a black and white take.

    If only Avatar had some brains behind the script.

    Short and sweet must read
  • CrispyLog 8 Aug 2019 15:45:13 132 posts
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    rice_sandwich wrote:
    Erebus The Story of a Ship - Michael Palin

    A pacy and well researched book about the life and times of the ships Erebus and Terror, most famously known for their part in the Franklin expedition of the NW passage. Only about a third of the book covers the NW voyage, the rest being a look at various Artic and Antarctic voyages undertaken by said ships. Well worth reading for a good overview of 19th century British polar exploration.
    Brilliant book. I saw Palin a month or so ago doing a tour of talks with the first half all about the book. You can see how passionate and inquisitive he is, trying to get across the facts but also making it a human story.

    It reminds me of Bill Bryson's One Summer book, about Babe Ruth, early flight and mount Rushmore, all items I have no interest in. Yet in the hands of such an author it made a brilliant book.
  • glaeken 8 Aug 2019 15:51:01 12,070 posts
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    Children of Ruin - 6/10 - Not as good as Children of Time for me. It's a good read but felt a little too much like going over ground already covered in the first book. I like the universe and actually was a little disappointed when the spiders turned up in this one as I would have liked just another story in the same universe rather than it ending up being linked.
  • Deleted user 20 August 2019 14:56:27
    Battlefield Earth... all 1084 pages of it.

    This is really a book in three parts. The first part is fairly decent and is what the (universally panned but I liked it) film is based on. I enjoyed it and it told a good though at times implausible sci-fi story. I'm going to watch the film again off the back of it. As I say, I'm a sucker for the film which I watched before I heard it was crap and instead just enjoyed for what it was.

    There area a few differences between the film and the book, with the book being more plausible than finding Harrier jumpjets which are still serviceable after a 1000 years of time has passed. However, it is largely the same and elements of the film are better as its shorter and less waffely and cuts out some of the crap.

    I'd give this part of the book a 7/10

    Then part 2 is about an alien fleet turning up and doing very little for most of the book and our hero's attempts to deal with them and his human nemesis. This part is pretty confused and all the aliens are just two legged versions of human creatures (e.g. shark aliens, beaver aliens etc) and are universally stupid. The whole book starts to fall apart at this point and it starts to get mindnumbingly dull. Human tribes are also all sterotypes of modern day countries which gets a bit insulting too (the chinese tribe are great at cooking and serving, the german tribe are great at banking, the swiss tribe are great at jewellry etc).

    Talking of banking, part 3 is all about that... and mathematics. I won't go into it, but it is shite.

    Parts 2 and 3 are probably worth a 2/10. Hubbard goes into a rant about psychiatrists in these parts (especially part 3) and starts to introduce elements of his Scientology.

    Overall... read the first part up to the film ending and then bin it.

    ..or just bin it. Its not all that great. 3/10 in total and not worth the time it took to read it. Classic it isn't. Most "characters" are so one dimensional they don't even have names.
  • Tamram 13 Sep 2019 00:44:26 3 posts
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    I recently finished the Third book of Murakami's novel 1Q84. Liked it, but I'm not sure I'll read it again.
  • RichDC 17 Sep 2019 17:26:57 8,815 posts
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    I Am Legend

    Loved it. Short and easy to read, with a great story. I can now understand the anger around how shit the film was in comparison. :lol:

    Recommended

    Edited by RichDC at 17:27:30 17-09-2019
  • Deleted user 17 September 2019 18:44:13
    Bad Science (Ben Goldacre)

    Started off alright and then the guy got heavily into hammering a select few people he clearly didn't like and he went on and on about them. He got pretty sarcastic and superiorly sneery about them and journalists to the point that I was seriously pissed off with him more than the people he was having a go at. I fot the point he was making 50 pages ago, homeopathy is nonsense, you gave the reasosn, now move on and tell me something ele rather than going on again about NotARealDoctor Gillian McKeith.

    Really didn't learn a lot from the book aside from "Don't beleive everything you read". It definitely felt lacking in substance and more like a personal vendetta against people who pissed him off.

    Disappointed.
  • Deleted user 17 September 2019 18:46:19
    The Science of Mindfulness

    This was an audbile course by the "Great Courses" which ran for 30 hours. I learnt a great deal from it and recommend it. It went into a great many facets of mindfulness and the scientific evidence behind the benefits. It also comes with some meditations to use. The lecturer had a good voice though he stumbled over his words a few times.

    I'll listen to it again at some point.
  • askew 17 Sep 2019 19:06:24 21,324 posts
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    askew wrote:
    I thought this would be the best place to mention it, but the author of the short story behind Arrival - Ted Chang - has had his new compilation published in the UK now: Exhalation. Excited to tuck in.
    FWIW, Exhalation was very good. Some stories I found a little inscrutable because you've suddenly got a whole bunch of story-specific jargon to understand, but not too much time for it to become familiar.
  • kentmonkey 17 Sep 2019 19:25:42 23,519 posts
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    @GuybrushFreepwood I felt very similar when I read it. Started off with a lot of promise, then veered into 'internet forum rant' territory by the end.
  • JoelStinty 20 Sep 2019 06:32:07 8,798 posts
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    Memoirs of the Geisha - Arthur Golden

    A peculiar book, one of the most interesting yet boring books I have read. The interesting is the well researched look into the life of a Geisha - everything is detailed from all the components of a kimono to their day to day routine, but ultimately I found the story rather dull, albeit the last 50 pages are well crafted and written and does elevate the tedium before it.

    My issue is that, although in some way it maybe because a geisha life is so confined, is that it is just a melodrama between a group of people that could exist anywhere, but given the time (An empire in decline, the great Depression through to world war 2) that the novel exists and the people that popular geisha entertained I always felt that there could be a more devastating or intriguing story to tell rather than one of personal growth and their rise through the geisha ranks.

    3/5

    Edited by JoelStinty at 06:33:46 20-09-2019
  • jrmat 20 Sep 2019 07:10:47 197 posts
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    I've recently listened to the new thrawn trilogy by Timothy Zahn on Audible. The first one is an excellent book. Very engaging and cleverly written. The second one jumped between time periods which I felt didn't work and I have up about a third of the way in. The third one was like the first, very good, showed thrawn being one step ahead all the time. Probably not quite as good as the first, but a very good read.

    What I liked was that they were good books irrespective of the star wars element. Would recommend.
  • Deleted user 22 September 2019 21:06:30
    Warbreaker - Brian Sanderson

    Not a fan at all. The pace really dragged and the story didn't really didn't go anywhere for ages and ages. I was a bit sick of the book jumping from person to person as I would be just getting into someone's tale and it would be off to another. I Was also sick of Vevenna and her sister wasn't much better. Best characters to me were the talking sword and it's owber. Neither were in the book as much as they should have been.

    The book gets okay in the last ten percent, but it takes hours and hours of turgid drivel to get there. Few plot holes in the book which annoyed me and the whole thing was stuck mostly in one city and mostly in only a few areas of the place.

    I know the guy is highly rated by fantasy fans, but I've read a few of his books now and don't get the appeal. I'll not be bothering again. He's not a David Gemmell and spends way too long waffling and getting nowhere very slowly.

    Edit: It may be that Brandon Sanderson's version of the book is better than the copy I read. Maybe it was some chinese knock off with a ghost writer...

    Edited by GuybrushFreepwood at 12:44:13 23-09-2019
  • PazJohnMitch 23 Sep 2019 07:36:05 15,689 posts
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    Brandon
  • Deleted user 23 September 2019 12:43:05
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