Rate the last book you read Page 86

  • CrispyLog 4 Oct 2019 21:47:01 131 posts
    Seen 4 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    New Bill Bryson book is out now and as you'd expect it's brilliantly pitched, full of crazy stats, interesting facts and humour.
  • barchetta 17 Oct 2019 23:23:30 2,240 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 18 years ago
    The new 'Scarfolk' Annual 197- arrived today. Had slipped my mind after pre-ordering back in the spring....

    Just had a very quick skim and it does indeed look like more of the Scarfolk alt-Britain with plenty of sinister takes on good old institutions, media references and organizations from my childhood.

    Fantastic eye for style and typography from that period too.
  • StixxUK 18 Oct 2019 13:51:17 8,284 posts
    Seen 8 hours ago
    Registered 18 years ago
    I also recently finished Children of Time.

    Liked it, especially the ending but I can't say it gripped me all the way through... Started reading the Outsider by Stephen King - havent read one of his for about 15 years and I know it's an entirely different proposition but it's definitely more "unputdownable"
  • jrmat 18 Oct 2019 14:03:01 176 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 2 years ago
    @StixxUK It's a decent book, perhaps slightly let down by the ending, shame as it's otherwise very good.
  • QBX 27 Oct 2019 23:32:14 143 posts
    Seen 4 hours ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Desperation - Stephen King

    The last book of his I read was Insomnia which I found dull and not at all scary so it was nice to see this go back to basics. A group of people are brought together in a deserted mining town where there is an evil force on the loose.

    Pacing is good (cliche page turner) though begins to slow around the final third. Once things get started the setting had a faint 'The Thing' vibe about it and characters are well fleshed out with Taks victims given a particularly gruesome description.

    My main concern was the religious aspect which arises and thankfully doesn't detract from the plot though I think more could have been done with it. Another minor gripe I have is the language/words used by the 11 year old boy which sounds false and not like anything an 11 year old would say.

    All in all though I really liked it.

    8/10
  • Your-Mother 28 Oct 2019 00:12:15 3,772 posts
    Seen 10 minutes ago
    Registered 3 years ago
    Speaking of King, his new one (The Institute) is pretty bad. The Bill Hodges trilogy was reasonable (except for the last one, that stunk) but I think the last book of his I genuinely enjoyed was 11/22/63. Everything else since then has varied from still readable through to terrible. His glory days do seem to be behind him.
  • Mola_Ram 28 Oct 2019 02:26:10 22,783 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    He's taken a hard turn into murder mystery/crime, and he's... just not that good at it. Not especially bad either, but there's like a million writers in that genre and he doesn't stand out at all.
  • Your-Mother 28 Oct 2019 03:29:46 3,772 posts
    Seen 10 minutes ago
    Registered 3 years ago
    Heís been writing pulp crime all his life in between the horror and modern fantasy. He did a couple of books for a crime imprint that were still very much King (Colorado Kid is implied to be in the Dark Tower universe, for one), and though he did somewhat pivot to something closer to Harlan Coben-esque mystery thrillers with Mr Mercedes, even that went pants on head supernatural stupid at the end of the trilogy.
  • Mola_Ram 28 Oct 2019 04:11:45 22,783 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Those earlier ones were all Bachmann, right?
  • Trowel 31 Oct 2019 19:37:23 23,044 posts
    Seen 18 hours ago
    Registered 16 years ago
    I just popped in here to mention The Institute. I thought King had turned it around and found a niche in the readable but forgettable thriller-crime-supernatural genre. But in The Institute he takes a weird PG-13 turn down the route of X-men with a host of forgettable characters, mundane events, and nary a fright to be found. And the tempo is fucked; at one point I literally forgot one of the main characters existed because another storyline had dragged on for so long.

    To be honest I think you could stitch together a chapter out of each book since Doctor Sleep and you'd be none the wiser.

    I've got shelves and boxes full of everything he's written, and occasionally take down one of the pre-minivan books just to remind myself of what we've lost. Can't beat that sensation of reading to 1am, putting the book down slightly breathless, then creeping to the toilet in the dark knowing that there's nothing really lying waiting in the shadows...
  • JoelStinty 31 Oct 2019 20:36:14 8,630 posts
    Seen 8 minutes ago
    Registered 6 years ago
    I've never actually read a King novel. It's odd that someone who reads fairly regularly (though perhaps not as much as I used too) hasn't read one. Its just one of those things that I never got round to doing. One day I will!

    Edited by JoelStinty at 20:37:02 31-10-2019
  • RawShark 31 Oct 2019 20:46:37 1,104 posts
    Seen 28 minutes ago
    Registered 8 years ago
    Animal - Sara Pascoe

    Equal parts funny, enlightening and deeply sad.

    I feel like the opinions held are deeply tied to the authorís own experiences, so donít quite apply as vigorously to everyone as she maintains, for the modern western reader at least, but it definitely made me think on my own experiences and it opened my eyes somewhat. And if a book can make you revaluate your conceptions towards things like sex and feminism then itís something everyone should get in on.

    I honestly think it should be mandatory reading at schools. The key thing I took from it is that education is everything, especially regarding sex, and weíre nowhere near doing a good enough job with it as things stand.
  • askew 31 Oct 2019 20:50:21 21,009 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 14 years ago
    I finished Pullman's "The Secret Commonwealth" last night, and while I enjoyed the first two-thirds, the more I think about it, the more disappointed I am. "La Belle Sauvage" was lean and fun all the way through, while "The Secret Commonwealth" just got bogged down with real-life parallels.
  • Dougs 19 Nov 2019 21:45:11 92,762 posts
    Seen 59 minutes ago
    Registered 17 years ago
    The Next Person You Meet in Heaven.

    Ooof, that was a hard read. Hit me right in the feels throughout and felt distinctly melancholy from start to finish. A worthy sequel though, and a must read if you enjoyed the first.

    Edited by Dougs at 21:45:32 19-11-2019
  • RichDC 22 Nov 2019 00:57:09 8,756 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 16 years ago
    Travellers in the Third Reich - Julia Boyd

    An in depth look at Nazi Germany seen through the eyes of foreign visitors (diplomats, journalists, tourists etc), covering from the end of WWI through to the start of WWII. Heavy going at times, but the stories from various travellers from all backgrounds make for fascinating reading.
  • Alastair 8 Dec 2019 14:48:27 24,188 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 18 years ago
    Someone on here recommended 'The Kings of the Wyld' - I finished it a couple of days ago.
    Really enjoyed it. I don't claim to be a book reviewer, so I won't try to write one, but it was a good take of DnD style fantasy.
    A retired adventuring party get back together to mount a rescue mission for the daughter of one of the members, with hilarious results!!
  • JoelStinty 23 Dec 2019 12:35:17 8,630 posts
    Seen 8 minutes ago
    Registered 6 years ago
    1Q84 - Murikami

    Enjoyed it. It is a weird novel, its plot could probably just about fill a novella, but its spread across 1300 pages. But there was something about it that just kept me going. It probably helped that the previous book I read (Memoirs of a Geisha) I really struggled to get through its 400 pages, but I never felt that with this. There is a lyrical quality to this that is a bit looser than his previous works which I dug, and whilst the repetition of the book is evident, I did find it useful in hammering home what it wanted to say, whilst juggling all the many threads that were happening. I dug pretty much all of the characters too.

    I kind of have a love hate relationship with Murikami. I wouldn't call it hate, more frustration, I find that he can set up books extremely well and he is very good at enticing you into his worlds but I found a lot of his works fall a bit flat in its second half. But there is something addictive and compelling about his books that make me come back regularly and I often think about them. I do find it hard to pin down exactly what and who murikami is! But I did find the ending to this really satisfying. (He can end books! Hooray!) Some elements are left to ponder, but I felt that, whilst its truehat around the 700 - 800 page mark you wonder where he is going with this, it does become a more straightforward Alice in Wonderland story in its third act with people having to confront their past before they can move on. There is a lot of duality in the book, from characters to plot, to objects and ideas, and it never lets you settle, when you think its going one way, it pulls somewhere else. I liked that ambiguity in the book.

    I think this is actually one of his strongest endings. I wouldn't recommend it to first time Murikami readers, and for long time fans, their isn't thing remotely new, but.. yeah I enjoyed it.

    4/5
  • Deleted user 23 December 2019 12:45:06
    Just read Magician and then Silverthorn by Raymond E Feist.

    Read them years ago when I had dreams and my while life ahead of me. Decades later, I've enjoyed them all over again. The odd scenes are familiar but thankfully overall I'm a forgetful Muppet.

    Enjoyed them a lot. Maybe a little waffley in places.
  • robthehermit 24 Dec 2019 11:58:45 7,653 posts
    Seen 38 minutes ago
    Registered 16 years ago
    Way of Kings (Stormlight Saga 1)
    Brandon Sanderson


    3rd time reading this, great book. About to read the 2nd one for the second time, then I'll be reading the 3rd one for the first time. In a couple of years when/if the 4th book is released and I get round to buying it you can add one to the numbers above.
  • drhickman1983 24 Dec 2019 12:20:15 6,495 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Dogs of War - Adrian Tchaikovsky

    Very good sci-fi speculative fiction. About Bio-engineered life forms used as weapons by mercenary companies.

    Takes a few twists into different areas, sometimes quite action heavy and violent, at other times it's pretty much a courtroom drama exploring the notions of sentience and accountability.

    By serendipity some of the idea touched on in regards to corporate entities are also explored in the book I just started, Sapiens by Yuval Harari.
  • Phattso 25 Dec 2019 17:42:43 25,032 posts
    Seen 12 minutes ago
    Registered 16 years ago
    Iíve enjoyed every sci-fi book Iíve read by Adrian Tchaikovsky. Children of Time/Ruin are both phenomenal.
  • Graxlar_v3 25 Dec 2019 18:02:55 9,632 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 3 years ago
    robthehermit wrote:
    Way of Kings (Stormlight Saga 1)
    Brandon Sanderson


    3rd time reading this, great book. About to read the 2nd one for the second time, then I'll be reading the 3rd one for the first time. In a couple of years when/if the 4th book is released and I get round to buying it you can add one to the numbers above.
    I just got round to reading the first three books of the series back to back. The last book took a nose dive in quality I thought, but I am invested enough to look forward to the fourth book when it has been released.
  • Graxlar_v3 25 Dec 2019 18:04:23 9,632 posts
    Seen 2 hours ago
    Registered 3 years ago
    I am currently going through the disc world books.(just finishing sourcery). Terry Pratchett is clearly one of the best writers!
  • simpleexplodingmaybe 26 Dec 2019 00:22:53 12,531 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 5 years ago
    Been revisiting a handful of my favourite MR James stories this week.

    While the premise of most is quite similar (young academic type prying too deeply into places or ideas they shouldn't with terrible consequences) I just love the vibe of them so much.

    I suspect that some people might get turned off by slow or staid or quaint they seem to modern eyes but the atmosphere and connection to an older, weirder (wyrder) Britain lends them a real sense of authenticity. Like these weren't dreamt up by a scholar in the 1920s but illustrate real ancient tales.

    It's a shame BBC 4 only showed one new adaptation this year and none of the ones from the 70s or the other recent ones Mark Gatiss has put together. Definite 70s vibe in Martin's Close though.
  • barchetta 26 Dec 2019 00:37:41 2,240 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 18 years ago
    Dug out the old late 60's version of "Whistle and I'll Come to You", starring Michael Hordern, a short while back. Still fantastic and a great interpretation of M R James' story.
  • simpleexplodingmaybe 26 Dec 2019 00:44:15 12,531 posts
    Seen 6 hours ago
    Registered 5 years ago
    I should really just stump up for the BFI Ghost Stories for Christmas collection on DVD. Pretty sure that Dickens one about a train tunnel is in there too.
  • drhcnip 26 Dec 2019 01:47:47 6,462 posts
    Seen 2 months ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    it is - it's a brilliant collection - just watched the signalman this evening along with a few others...

    that box set, along with the bbc's supernatural from the 70s and gatiss's crooked house are an annual tradition here

    also a massive m r james fan...
Log in or register to reply

Sometimes posts may contain links to online retail stores. If you click on one and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. For more information, go here.