Rate the last book you read Page 93

  • TechnoHippy 24 May 2020 21:20:27 17,476 posts
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    The spatterjay virus is a thing of beauty :-)
  • Tonka 25 May 2020 09:22:29 30,894 posts
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    Neuromancer

    First time I read it in english. Can't say I noticed any difference, possibly because I haven't read it for so long. It was fascinating to see what bits had stuck in my memory. Little scenes eery now and then.

    Anyway, the grand daddy of Cyberpunk and what a grand daddy it is. Marvellous, an absolute classic in every respect. Fascinating to see how well it holds up. Yes, mobile phones are completely absent. There are mentions of disks, but it's unclear what kind of disks and for what purpose, so it's not so bad.

    The often times mentioned scene with a bank of pay-phones doesn't strike me as that out of place though.

    But all that aside, this vision of the future hits very close to home. Next up is Count Zero.
  • Fourwisemen 25 May 2020 09:50:59 913 posts
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    Sing Backwards and Weep a memoir by Mark Lanegan

    I very rarely read and memoirs or biographyís and prefer to escape to worlds of fiction but the life of Mark Lanegan is so far removed from my own it feels unreal.

    ML is a singer/song writer I first came across via his vocal spots on a number of Queens of the Stone Age tracks and then started to listen to his solo works and those with a number of collaborators (Soulsavers, Unkle, Bomb the Bass, Isobel Campbell, Moby etc). Itís fair to say he has become one of my favourite artists and whilst I knew he had a reputation for being a moody, scary and the kind of guy interviewers didnít enjoy engaging with knew nothing of his life...

    ...and it turns out his early life and early career with first band Screaming Trees is quite a ride and one that takes you to a fair few places I wouldnít want to visit personally.

    Thereís fights, relationships with Rock royalty, tours, fights with rock royalty, the dangers and pitfalls of the music business etc. The overbearing narrative of the story though is a mans descent into addiction and homelessness with stories so vivid and well articulated I actually felt a little queasy while reading.

    Although there is much humour in the writing and some genuinely funny chapters, it is overall a heavy read and in particular a long chapter on the last Screaming Trees European tour which sounds as close to hell as being alive can be.

    Fans of biographyís or those whoíve and interest in the 90s music scene should enjoy it. Fans of MLs music may find it particularly insightful (the book only covers his life up to his first two solo albums and Iíve since given these more listening time, the second of which is superb and donít know how Iíd not invested time into it earlier) and those who only know the singer is passing might be turned onto a new artist.

    9/10
  • wobbly_Bob 25 May 2020 13:21:18 5,162 posts
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    The 1000 doors of January. It was alright but nothing special. The plot is basically a girl discovers there are doors between multiple realities and that words have the power to shape the world. More could have been done with this. Surprisingly she visits very few of these worlds.

    The writing is all over the place. Sometimes it's great but other times sinks into the swamps of cliche and banality. It's almost like there are two people writing here. The characters are likeable enough and I did care about their story.

    The themes are fairly obvious but enjoyable enough. The book is about coming of age, travel, and how we can shape the world with words, "the pen is mightier than the sword." Nothing we don't really know already.
  • JoeBlade 25 May 2020 14:06:03 5,089 posts
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    @Tonka Ahh, one of my favourite novels from one of my favourite authors.

    I'm yet to read Gibson's latest come to think of it. I really ought to get around to that.
  • Tonka 25 May 2020 14:22:27 30,894 posts
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    @JoeBlade Agency was a bit of a let down for me. I really enjoyed The Peripheral so I was surprised that Agency didn't bowl me over. But I've found that I like Gibson better, the further into the future he writes.
  • Mola_Ram 2 Jun 2020 11:24:21 23,982 posts
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    I just read Easy Riders, Raging Bulls, a book written in the 90s about filmmaking in the 60s and 70s.

    It's pretty weird to be reading this in the MeToo era. The people being interviewed talk openly - even nostalgically! - about shit that is sexual harassment at best, sexual assault at worst. Most people are drug-addled or power-crazed or violent or rapey, or some combination of all of those things. They're great storytellers, but my god they're complete assholes.

    It's a real eye-opener, if you're at all interested in film history.
  • quadfather 2 Jun 2020 11:26:44 36,734 posts
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    Acid for the children by Flea.

    Amazing book, and really enjoyed it. Enjoyed is a strange word for this as it's a bit of a roller coaster with lots of poignant parts.

    Highly recommended though. I'm onto Scar Tissue by Anthony Kiedis now, and that has an interesting spin on the whole thing too - they both (obviously) overlap, but you get both sides of the experiences.
  • johnx3214 2 Jun 2020 11:45:47 2 posts
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    Rich Dad Poor Dad

    10/10

    Such A Amazing Book With Amazing Concept TO Make Money!
  • Tonka 14 Jun 2020 16:20:36 30,894 posts
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    The Poppy War

    I loved the first third. Perfect summer book, a breezy cliched mix of Harry Potter, and Shake under eagles shadow, with a hint of The Kingdoms.

    Then it decided to stand on its own legs and I wish it hadn't. Utter crap.
  • Nazo 14 Jun 2020 17:55:34 1,367 posts
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    A Girl From Nowhere - James Maxwell

    First book in a fantasy trilogy, it isn't billed as being for younger readers but feels like it should be. I'm not a particularly sophisticated reader but the prose felt very over-simplistic at times, which distracted from some otherwise decent world-building and story telling. It left me curious about where it will go next but I doubt I'll pursue it.

    3/5
  • TechnoHippy 14 Jun 2020 20:00:27 17,476 posts
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    Feet of Clay - Terry Prachett

    While not one of his best, it's still a top read. Sir Terry's societal observations are pretty much spot on.

    7/10
  • Tonka 24 Jun 2020 17:33:12 30,894 posts
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    Count Zero
    Fantastic. Cyberpunk classic, full of ideas, some that are just being realised thanks to Covid19.

    A must read
  • TechnoHippy 24 Jun 2020 18:49:17 17,476 posts
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    Guards, Guards

    Prachett at his finest. It is fun re-reading the earlier books and seeing how much the older characters have evolved over the series.

    10/10
  • TechnoHippy 26 Jun 2020 13:15:43 17,476 posts
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    Sounds like cheating to me.
  • jrmat 27 Jun 2020 09:04:41 204 posts
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    Just Cause by Jon Katzenbach 8/10

    Very good. He writes in a way that makes the characters seem very real and like you really know them. This, the Analyst and Hart's War are very well written books.

    Just cause follows the cases of a man frees from death row by a journalist and then the horrific repercussions.
  • Murbs 4 Jul 2020 22:44:53 24,815 posts
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    The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle

    Saw it described as Groundhog Day meets Agatha Christie and that's pretty much spot on. Brilliant read.

    5/5
  • Your-Mother 4 Jul 2020 23:11:42 4,472 posts
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    I know it was posted a while ago but the sex scenes in Neuromancer nearly broke the book for me. Even worse is Gibsonís own narration on the audiobook release where those are the only moments he manages to put any kind of emotion behind his voice.
  • Tonka 5 Jul 2020 11:45:05 30,894 posts
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    I listened three minutes to the audio book before giving up. Nearly broke Gibson for me.

    Sex scenes in general tend to be cringey imo. To the point where I wonder why the authors bother with them.
  • Tonka 5 Jul 2020 11:45:06 30,894 posts
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    I listened three minutes to the audio book before giving up. Nearly broke Gibson for me.

    Sex scenes in general tend to be cringey imo. To the point where I wonder why the authors bother with them.
  • bone-on 5 Jul 2020 17:11:24 543 posts
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    My mate suggested the first 3 books in the Horus Heresy from the black Library. So I got them on audible

    As itís games Workshop and all that was sceptical but my god what an amazing trilogy that was.
  • TechnoHippy 5 Jul 2020 17:21:16 17,476 posts
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    I have a soft spot for the 40K universe - it's just so grim it's a delight.
  • robc84 14 Jul 2020 07:18:17 14,507 posts
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    Hyperion and Fall of Hyperion - 8/10

    It was a tough read in places for my simple brain, but overall i really enjoyed it. I only knocked a couple of points off as it seems (to me anyway) that there are a number of plot holes. For example:

    What is the point of Kassadís story? Heís made out to be a hero warrior but ultimately he died fighting the shrike like so many before him. Doesnít seem to make sense to me.

    How come Brawne could defeat the Shrike so easily at the end? That was a bit jarring.

    Why was there a need for a second Keats cybrid? Donít really understand why the first had to die, or why it knows Brawneís baby is the Empathy part of the human Ďgodí.

    How come only Silenus is put on the tree of thorns? The Shrike seems quite inconsistent in its behaviour.


    I realise that there are two more books to read, which may answer some of these questions. Itís just at this point there is a lot that doesnít seem to make sense.

    Still excellent reads though.
  • Nazo 20 Jul 2020 08:44:05 1,367 posts
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    A Man - Keiichiro Hirano

    A Tokyo lawyer investigates the idenity of a client's dead husband who had been posing as someone else.

    Really interesting ruminations on the meaning and nature of identity, and touches on some of the less often explored elements of Japanese culture.
    I wish I'd read it in the original Japanese though as the translation feels a bit awkward at times.

    4.5 / 5
  • PazJohnMitch 20 Jul 2020 11:04:43 15,989 posts
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    Wheel of Time (Book 1)

    Enjoyed it but it was not as epic as I was expecting. I liked it enough to continue with the series though.

    8/10
  • Mola_Ram 20 Jul 2020 11:07:33 23,982 posts
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    The second Wheel of Time is probably the best one. If you ever end up burning out on the series - it happened for me about book 8 or 9 - you can skip a few (but read summaries) and start again when Sanderson takes over.
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