Which it is the *official* Aubrey-Maturin thread for salty sea-dogs, for all love Page 2

  • otto Moderator 15 Jan 2010 21:03:38 49,322 posts
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    Maturin wrote:
    A new BBC history series on the Royal Navy begins soon. Looks right up the street of Aubrey/Maturin fans for all love.

    Empire of the Seas Linky
    Just started on BBC2
  • Blaketown 8 Apr 2010 21:08:29 5,658 posts
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    Thanks mainly to this thread I've got stuck into these books recently currently on book 7 (The Surgeons Mate) and I've got to say I'm totally hooked. Prodigious good reading.

    Just thought I'd say thanks to Otto and the others in here for alerting me to their existence.

    Worth also pointing out I'm listening to them in Audiobook form (thanks to 3-4 hours on the M25 every day) and if you are tempted to do the same make sure you get the ones read by Patrick Tull. I bought copy of Post Captain read by someone else and they were terrible, the guy read Aubreys part like he was Ace Rimmer and Maturin like Kenneth fucking Williams.
  • Deleted user 8 April 2010 21:24:44
    Blaketown wrote:
    Worth also pointing out I'm listening to them in Audiobook form (thanks to 3-4 hours on the M25 every day) and if you are tempted to do the same make sure you get the ones read by Patrick Tull. I bought copy of Post Captain read by someone else and they were terrible, the guy read Aubreys part like he was Ace Rimmer and Maturin like Kenneth fucking Williams.

    They redid them recently, and since then the unabridged ones have vanished from fucking everywhere. You can find them on a search on Audible, but it errors when you try to buy them with a 'SORRY, NOT AVAILABLE ANYMORE' message.
  • Khab 8 Apr 2010 21:25:18 6,583 posts
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    I love these books. Thank you for making me read them, ottster.
  • Blaketown 4 May 2010 13:11:38 5,658 posts
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    otto wrote:
    Oh and making a quick reference to the film, it has to be one of the best novel to cinema adaptations ever made, and the casting is perfect, except for Bonden. I mean, casting a Scottish hobbit as Bonden: wtf?

    Having just got passed The Far Side Of The World in the books I think I'm going to watch the movie at some point this week.

    If Maturin doesn't fall between the boat and the ship at least once, the entire movie will be a total fail as far as I'm concerned.

    Also Jack must laugh way to much at a shit pun he has just come up with.
  • President_Weasel 4 May 2010 13:25:02 12,355 posts
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    Blaketown wrote:
    I'm concerned.

    Also Jack must laugh way to much at a shit pun he has just come up with.

    You must have no fear on that account.
  • Deleted user 4 May 2010 13:32:31
    Not just a shit pun either, but the shit pun.

    Good calls though - there is a lack of Maturin clumsiness.
  • President_Weasel 4 May 2010 13:38:10 12,355 posts
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    Bremenacht wrote:
    Not just a shit pun either, but the shit pun.

    Good calls though - there is a lack of Maturin clumsiness.

    That said, I thought Mr Jennifer Connelly gave an excellent perfomance as Maturin. I think he and the director both really grokked the character.
  • otto Moderator 11 May 2010 13:48:21 49,322 posts
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    Blaketown wrote:
    Having just got passed The Far Side Of The World in the books I think I'm going to watch the movie at some point this week.
    Don't go thinking that the film closely follows the book. The chase sequence is the central plot element but in every other aspect it differs, borrowing elements from other books and creating totally new ones. Even the nationality of the ship being chased has been changed. The film doesn't spoil the book in any way, and vice versa of course.
  • Carbon_Altered 11 May 2010 13:58:56 887 posts
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    I loved these books. And what a great time for this thread to resurface - I'm off on my hols next week (volcano dependent) and was wondering what books to take. A couple of these and I'm sorted. Thanks for the reminder!!

    "sir, you have debauched my sloath"

    I'm going to Antigua (sorry if that sounds like gloating) and am intending to retread some of Nelson's footsteps there. I'm a nerd for that sort of thing.

    What other books from this era are any good? I'm not really into Hornblower. Alexander Kent wrote a series too that I never got into. Any more?
  • RyanDS 11 May 2010 14:07:15 13,280 posts
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    Anybody with a love of these books really should do themselves the favour of reading a biography of the man who they are (very very) loosely based on. Thomas Cochrane.

    Cochrane was called the Sea Wolf by Napolean, and performed probably the most audacious and brilliant acts of the Naval war. The highlight being the Speedy versus the Gamo. The Gamo was a 32 gun Spanish vessel, with 319 crew, Cochrane commanded the Speedy, a 14 gun, 59 crew vessel. By sailing his tiny ship close enough to the spanish vessel the spanish were unable to attack as their guns were too hight, shooting over the Speedy, but at the same time Cochrane stayed far enough away to avoid a boardning. In the end Cochrane took the Gamo, losing only 3 men, when he was outnumber 6-1.

    He was also an inventor, reform campaigner, lead the Chilean and Argentinian revolutions in their naval fight...

    In all an amazing man. I've read 3 biographies of him, and they have all been good, maybe try this one... http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cochrane-Life-Exploits-Fighting-Captain/dp/1841193984/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273583199&sr=8-6
  • Carbon_Altered 11 May 2010 14:11:05 887 posts
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    ryandsimmons wrote:

    Cochrane was called the Sea Wolf by Napolean, and performed probably the most audacious and brilliant acts of the Naval war. The highlight being the Speedy versus the Gamo. The Gamo was a 32 gun Spanish vessel, with 319 crew, Cochrane commanded the Speedy, a 14 gun, 59 crew vessel. By sailing his tiny ship close enough to the spanish vessel the spanish were unable to attack as their guns were too hight, shooting over the Speedy, but at the same time Cochrane stayed far enough away to avoid a boardning. In the end Cochrane took the Gamo, losing only 3 men, when he was outnumber 6-1.

    Which is what O'Brian bases Aubrey's action in the Sophie (I think, or was it the Surprise?) early on in the series.

    Thanks for the Cochrane recommendation - always meant to read more about him but never got round to it.
  • boo 11 May 2010 14:24:31 13,607 posts
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    I have to say this intrigued me (but ultimately I don't think it's my sort of thing). However, went and read the first Amazon review of the first book.

    These people take it seriously! Reference books? Google Earth?

    "Start with this one then, book one and don't just skim it for the adventure story. Climb the rigging with the lubberly Dr Stephen Maturin and listen as he has explained to him the masts, yards and sails of the Sophie. After only a few pages you know the difference between the foremast and the mizzen, the stays, tops and ratlines. You will benefit from getting some maps; Minorca and the Spanish coast east of Gibraltar (look them up as soon as the place names come out of the text). You want to get a feel for the shape of the coast, harbours and ports. Don't spend any money, just five minutes with the Google map facility and print them off, nicely magnified so you get all the capes and points. Now you can feel the tension as the Sophie ducks under the enemy guns, steals a prize and races for safety with a half dozen frigates in hot pursuit; all the naval engagements make a whole lot more sense; you might even mark the positions of the vessels and follow their movements; Patrick O'Brian gives you enough description to clearly visualise every detail and this is where he scores most of his points and wins his lifelong devotees. The author had vast resources of knowledge about naval engagements of the period and most of the action is painstakingly recreated from real events, as reported by those who took part in them. This is far more than historical fiction, it is the bringing back to vivid life of a period of our relatively recent history.

    Next if you find the story intriguing but the nautical terms frustrating (you are not alone in this), you might consider purchasing a reference book: The World of Jack Aubrey by David Miller (I paid 5.99), a shortish, hard-backed book for the twenty-first century reader, full of diagrams and explanations and with a glossary of technical terms. The mysteries of the stunsail, the use of the log, the bells of the watch and the use of the glass will all become clear, along with good descriptions of the various vessels that feature, from lateens to bum-boats, sloops and brigs, the points of the compass and the different fighting styles of the British and French men o' war (British preferred solid shot aimed at the hull that sent explosions of splinters through the enemy crew, wheras the French preferred chain and grape shot to disable and capture.

    A further book is a worthwhile purchase, Admiral W.H. Smyth's The Sailor's Word-Book (Conway 9.99). This fat period tome comprises over 14,000 nautical and naval terms, every technical word used by Patrick O'Brian is in there, described in crisp clarity, the Admiral spent the seven years of his retirement from 1858 - 1865 working on this mine of information and the Aubrey/Maturin enthusiast will have this reference close by at all times."
  • Blaketown 13 May 2010 14:01:48 5,658 posts
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    Sadly I've been looking into some reference books to get the Sails and Rigging sorted in my minds eye.

    I also like the look of this.
  • Deleted user 13 May 2010 15:55:02
    Blaketown wrote:
    Sadly I've been looking into some reference books to get the Sails and Rigging sorted in my minds eye.

    I also like the look of this.
    Figgy-dowdy!
    Ship's biscuit! (with weevils, I hope)

    What a great find - I've stuck that on my wish-list.

    It's coming up for a year since I finished reading the series - is it worth getting the unfinished book? - and I'm thinking it's about time for me to start reading them all over again. So much detail has slipped my mind.

    Thinking back on them, I think the true genius of this series is how the humdrum, routine stuff is made so fascinating. The set-piece battles and chases are, of course, superb - but the day-to-day stuff becomes mesmerising. I don't know of any author who has managed to make material which *should* be boring, into something so wonderful. I'm probably repeating myself from a few pages back or some other thread, but who cares - it bears repeating.

    Probably a good idea getting a basic understanding the sails and rigging - I still hadn't got the hang of it by the end of the series. I really like the idea of spending a holiday on a sail-ship, through reading these books, so it could even be useful!
  • brokenkey 23 May 2010 06:18:02 10,519 posts
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    Sat here in the first class Qantas lounge in Sydney airport on the way home from a business trip, I did spy a large format book entitled

    "Fighting Ships 1750-1850", by Sam Willis

    It retails for 50 according to the cover slip, although amazon has it with a different cover for 15, and its full of paintings from the time of ships in various battles, at least one of which feature in the Aubrey range (I'm only up to the Fortune of War, so there may be others)

    worth looking out for.

    edit. oops, my camera appears to have escaped and taken a few choice photos of the Cheasapeak fight...
  • otto Moderator 23 May 2010 08:26:33 49,322 posts
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    Bremenacht wrote:
    It's coming up for a year since I finished reading the series - is it worth getting the unfinished book?
    Yes! (though also very frustrating!)
  • brokenkey 19 Sep 2011 15:38:44 10,519 posts
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    Aren't they? I saw a kindle book collection on a dodgy file sharing site ( my friend showed me) which included all of them.
  • Deleted user 19 September 2011 15:57:41
    As a thoroughly law-abiding type -and an owner of the series, honestly obtained, I should add- I feel obliged to assist in any examination of said sites for evidence of skullduggery. Anyone requiring such assistance should PM an appropriate link to me, without prejudice.

    Aubrey-Maturin in one device! Woooo. It's what Kindles were made for.
  • brokenkey 19 Sep 2011 18:05:46 10,519 posts
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    It might be difficult to find, since you have to download the full library in order to extract the books from it. And this particluar library has 4687 books in it. Kindle Organized Library 4687 Books. Imagine such a thing.
  • Deleted user 20 September 2011 22:27:27
    brokenkey wrote:
    It might be difficult to find, since you have to download the full library in order to extract the books from it. And this particluar library has 4687 books in it. Kindle Organized Library 4687 Books. Imagine such a thing.
    :o

    :)

    ;)
  • otto Moderator 21 Sep 2011 23:31:43 49,322 posts
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    Can you upload open format e-books to the Kindle? Because you can get these books in various e-book formats online without looking too hard. And there are plenty of format conversion tools out there.
  • Deleted user 21 September 2011 23:38:54
    I have all these books currently in pristine condition, gathering dust in a box in England (I'm now in Belgium). I uploaded them all to my Kindle a few months ago without a problem.

    ps. mobi format is best*, you can read them straight off, but it's still best to convert them again with Calibre with 'justification' and 'no gaps between paragraphs' settings - via Calibre. *though Calibre can convert almost any format.
  • Deleted user 22 September 2011 08:18:39
    I've got the whole lot in paper form. Would honestly buy them again on Kindle - they are my favourite books. But in the meantime I had some PDF and .txt versions on my pc. Caliber converted them and they are all on my Kindle.

    I wish they'd hurry up and release proper versions for Kindle. Even though I have them on my android phone and tablet there's obviously no syncing with my Kindle.

    And isn't it about time they found an author to carry on the series, it's happened with other famous characters.
  • Deleted user 22 September 2011 09:52:38
    Hear him, hear him.

    /drinks to it in bumpers three times three
  • Deleted user 27 November 2011 15:46:29
    They're better! Some of the themes develop over many books, so you might start thinking in terms of stories, rather than individual books. The battles still thrill, although that first one still stands out, years later.

    No idea about companion books, although I've popped that one on my wishlist to look at later. :)
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