Live Space Stuff Notification Thread Page 38

  • X201 22 Feb 2018 14:14:33 19,210 posts
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    Fake_Blood wrote:
    Is this one going to land?

    "SpaceX will not attempt to recover Falcon 9ís first stage after launch."
  • X201 22 Feb 2018 14:15:14 19,210 posts
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    Link repeat for new page

    http://www.spacex.com/webcast

    Two minutes
  • Fake_Blood 22 Feb 2018 15:41:30 9,485 posts
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    Well some cool images at least, night launches are awesome.
  • ZuluHero 22 Feb 2018 19:23:51 7,396 posts
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    I've often wondered, but always forget to ask or find out, what is all the gas/cloud surrounding/coming out of rockets as they are about to launch?
  • mal 22 Feb 2018 20:52:11 29,326 posts
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    It's the rocket starting up I think. Maybe a bit of dropped coolant and probably a lot of general crud will get picked up and give the hot gasses that smokey look, but the rockets are quite smokey anyway in the lower atmosphere - it's only higher up where there's less oxygen that they burn clean and look super cool. There's a big hole underneath the rocket to stop the hot gasses reflecting and cooking the rocket itself, and that vents out of the sides of the stand which is why it billows up in that particular way.
  • Fake_Blood 22 Feb 2018 20:54:54 9,485 posts
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    It's liquid oxygen warming up and turning back into a gas, which raises the pressure in the tank. The tank has a valve that keeps the pressure constant by letting out some of the oxygen.

    So the point is to cool your oxygen close to the freezing point, and only load it onto the rocket at the last possible time.
  • Fab4 6 Mar 2018 18:17:01 8,818 posts
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    Supposed to be another launch early tomorrow morning.

    Edit: Oh wait, it was this morning :)

    Edited by Fab4 at 18:18:41 06-03-2018
  • Fake_Blood 6 Mar 2018 19:19:23 9,485 posts
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    Yup, 50th falcon 9 launch it was too. Apparently it was quite a big sattelite, size of a bus, 6 tonnes to geostationary orbit.
  • RunningMan 6 Mar 2018 20:14:44 2,960 posts
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    5 more Falcon 9 launches in March and April. Another heavy launch in June. Getting super routine now.
  • Fake_Blood 6 Mar 2018 20:25:15 9,485 posts
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    This is the rate the shuttle was supposed to launch at believe it or not. A launch every 2 weeks.
    I mean I love the shuttle, but that and the space station were the two most expensive mistakes in space history.
  • mal 6 Mar 2018 23:16:34 29,326 posts
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    Ah Skylab. I'd forgotten about that, if I ever heard about it in the first place.
  • Fake_Blood 6 Mar 2018 23:19:34 9,485 posts
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    Iím talking about the ISS. Skylab was a second stage from the Saturn V that they had quite literally laying around after they cancelled apollo 18 and onward.
  • mal 7 Mar 2018 00:54:07 29,326 posts
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    Really? The skylab mutiny and the way it fell out of the sky onto Australia largely unplanned was quite a scandal at the time, I understand. The ISS has it's problems, but it's the longest lived space station we've yet made as a species I think and proved for almost the first time that the russians and the rest of us can work together. And at the end of the day it's still an experimental station so you expect a certain amount of roughness.
  • Fake_Blood 7 Mar 2018 01:25:05 9,485 posts
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    Last I heard the ISS cost 150 billion dollars. That's 50% more than the Apollo program.

    There would probably have been a colony on the moon and maybe mars by now if it wasn't for the shuttle and space station.
  • up_the_ante 7 Mar 2018 01:56:27 1,019 posts
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    The Shuttle was a relative disaster. It was suppose to have a few days turnaround between flights but often ended up being months, where large parts were stripped and rebuilt each time. The US military gave up on it being a reliable way to launch satellites (one of the reasons Congress green lighted the project to begin with) and ended up using conventional rockets. Estimates of $650 per pound to LEO ended up costing $27,000 per pound.

    The Russians thought it had some secret military ability (capturing enemy satellites) and developed their own version, the Buran, which flew once. Now that is expensive!
  • RobAnybody 11 Mar 2018 09:58:36 1,695 posts
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    Now we can finally see what happened to the centre core from Spacex's Falcon Heavy launch last month:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0FZIwabctw

    (just over 1 minute into the video).
  • Fab4 11 Mar 2018 10:10:20 8,818 posts
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    I don't think i'll ever tire of seeing that simultaneous landing.
  • RobAnybody 11 Mar 2018 10:32:30 1,695 posts
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    Fab4 wrote:
    I don't think i'll ever tire of seeing that simultaneous landing.
    Same here - it's bloody wonderful and it was gob-smacking seeing it live. :)

    Edited by RobAnybody at 10:32:53 11-03-2018
  • mal 11 Mar 2018 15:20:41 29,326 posts
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    RobAnybody wrote:
    Now we can finally see what happened to the centre core from Spacex's Falcon Heavy launch last month:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0FZIwabctw

    (just over 1 minute into the video).
    Ah so to stitch together the report I heard with what I saw there, looks like it ran out of propellant on the way down, came down hot and kind of out of control, missed the main platform and smacked its head end on the platform, spectacularly disassembling itself all over the area.
  • RobAnybody 11 Mar 2018 16:47:24 1,695 posts
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    mal wrote:
    RobAnybody wrote:
    Now we can finally see what happened to the centre core from Spacex's Falcon Heavy launch last month:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0FZIwabctw

    (just over 1 minute into the video).
    Ah so to stitch together the report I heard with what I saw there, looks like it ran out of propellant on the way down, came down hot and kind of out of control, missed the main platform and smacked its head end on the platform, spectacularly disassembling itself all over the area.
    Close but not quite.

    It in fact ran out of the ignition fluid that's used to to ignite the engines (kind of like running out of matches at the wrong moment):

    https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/963107229523038211

    Also, when the core (or any of the Falcons) are heading towards the drone ship, they always aim besides it then correct towards it at the last possible moment - this is done for instances like this where the core or the Falcon is coming in too fast. In this case the core was descending at about 300mph due to a lack of thrust and would have badly damaged the platform if it had hit it.
  • mal 11 Mar 2018 16:52:06 29,326 posts
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    Sounds like they might want to aim a bit further away from the platform if they don't want to twat the falling rocket all over it like they did then ;)

    Edited by mal at 16:52:26 11-03-2018
  • RobAnybody 11 Mar 2018 17:00:08 1,695 posts
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    Quite! :)
  • Fab4 2 Apr 2018 21:20:16 8,818 posts
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    Another SpaceX launch in about 10 minutes. No 1st stage recovery though.
  • Deleted user 2 April 2018 21:28:56
    Hubble picks out super giant star 9 billion light years away http://news.berkeley.edu/2018/04/02/cosmic-lens-helps-hubble-capture-most-distant-star-ever-seen/

    Thanks to gravitational lensing where giant galaxy clusters bend or magnify light this little dot of light represents the most distant single object ever recorded, absolutely remarkable.
  • KRadiation 3 Apr 2018 00:07:22 1,423 posts
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    That's insane.
  • solidsneek 3 Apr 2018 00:16:51 763 posts
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    Mental! - Do you guys ever watch conspiracy theories? Was watching this and it's quite interesting obviously take everything with a pinch of salt but it is really interesting. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CmtqiFnKwU&t=477s
  • Fake_Blood 18 Apr 2018 23:44:59 9,485 posts
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    SpaceX is targeting launch of NASAís Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) on Wednesday, April 18 from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. The 30-second launch window opens at 6:51 p.m. EDT, or 22:51 UTC. TESS will be deployed into a highly elliptical orbit approximately 48 minutes after launch.

    Launching in a couple of minutes.

    http://www.spacex.com/webcast

  • Fake_Blood 19 Apr 2018 00:19:58 9,485 posts
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    This is actually musk playing the synthesizer right now.
  • Fake_Blood 11 May 2018 21:01:59 9,485 posts
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    Launch and landing of Falcon 9 block 5 in couple of minutes.
    This new model is supposed to be able to do 10 flights with minimal maintenance.
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