Audio Cd copy protection and EMI

  • wysie 8 Nov 2002 14:38:10 82 posts
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    Thought this might interest some of you. This article in the Register deals with the reply from EMI to some poor sod who's new purchase wouldn't work on his cd-player. It's an interesting glimpse at the attitude some of these companies have...
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/content/54/28009.html
  • Azule 8 Nov 2002 15:57:34 98 posts
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    The problem is some people are going to be able to crack the protections are then it will still be distributable through p2p networks. Why don't these companies come to a compromise: lower the damn prices on CD's, then enforce copyright laws... I would buy more retail CD's, with their nice artwork and lyrics, if each one that I wanted wasn't 18 bucks....sheesh.
  • eviltobz 8 Nov 2002 16:12:33 2,511 posts
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    so, more cdrs sold than pre-recorded music cds. hmmm. ever think that people might be recording data on to a load of them? one of the projects that i work on churns through thousands of cdrs a week, and there aint no piracy there.

    secondly i know that i'm not alone in buying music because i've really liked some mp3 i heard, so it's like free advertising.
  • Gestalt 8 Nov 2002 16:18:57 98 posts
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    *sighs*

    Much as I sympathise with the record companies, if they start introducing strict copy protection on CDs, I'll stop buying them. It's as simple as that. As soon as I get a new CD, the first thing I do is MP3 it to my hard drive so that I can listen to it whenever I want to without having to dig through the hundreds of CDs I own to find the track(s) I'm looking for. If the copy protection won't let me do that, there's no point in me buying the CD.
  • Killerbee 8 Nov 2002 16:24:19 5,015 posts
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    Most of the CDRs I get through are on data backups, photos from the digital camera etc, so I agree that number isn't an indication of the level of music piracy at all.

    I for one buy loads of legit CDs (and legit games and DVDs for that matter), and I'm very happy to support the industry when it produces good stuff. What I object to is not being able to listen to my music when and how I like, whether that's in the car (where most of these copy protected CDs encounter problems) or on my PC, where I might want to use my CD drive for something else at the same time as listening to my music. If I paid for it, why can't I do this?
  • brutal 8 Nov 2002 17:18:15 883 posts
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    i seriously doubt any of this will really affect the availability of mp3 versions of music. Especially with existing music completely unprotected. Besides, most the stuff that these companies put out is complete rubbish anyway.
  • ssuellid 8 Nov 2002 17:21:35 19,141 posts
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    Someone will crack the copy protection. There are various claims that using old CD ROM drives gets around most if not all these current systems.

    It will piss me off no end if they do start doing this tho. At work I record everything to the PC hard disc, in car its minidisc, in the house copied to the xbox, on foot portable minidisc.
  • sam_spade 8 Nov 2002 23:24:33 15,745 posts
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    There's another story on The Reg detailing how the government is going to screw you over once again.
  • clapton-is-God 11 Nov 2002 00:15:54 47 posts
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    what can we do to stop music cd's having copy protection ?

    Edited by clapton is God at 07:42:28 11-11-2002
  • Khab 11 Nov 2002 03:19:34 6,583 posts
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    Stop buying music CD's. Or, kill some people and claim the music industry made you do it.
  • clapton-is-God 11 Nov 2002 07:44:37 47 posts
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    i must add to my last post...................

    that does not give ammunition for the music industry to justify it's decision.

    Edited by clapton is God at 07:45:17 11-11-2002
  • Azule 11 Nov 2002 09:23:19 98 posts
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    You can either turn back time, or you can do nothing about it. :p
  • clapton-is-God 12 Nov 2002 00:17:11 47 posts
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    why do'nt us eurogamer geeks all kidnap blunkett instead....
    oops should i edit this in case mi5/mi6 discover my identity ???????????????????????????

    my real name is........bond......jimmy bond ....
    go sus that out shayler boyos ;)



    Edited by clapton is God at 00:19:13 12-11-2002
  • bill 14 Nov 2002 03:00:01 139 posts
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    How DARE they try to protect thier software from piracy!......:/
  • Pirotic Moderator 14 Nov 2002 13:14:15 20,642 posts
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    it just goes to show how out of tune the music industry are, there is no possible way they can stop the MP3 situation which they blame for loss of sales, they spend millions on R&D but unless they introduce a new media all together there is no way to stop copying of CD's

    this new method simply stops some type of laser from reading the disk, this is the type used in most CD-writers, and some new CD-roms drives. but also used in a handfull of new CD players.. all its going to do is piss alot of people off and they wont bother buying the CD at all unless they can be assured it'll work on there system

    As for copying, with the advent of the internet it only requires one person in the world to be able to copy the CD, then the second he puts it on a file sharing service we can all have it and burn it ourselves.

    they need to make CD's cheaper, and introduce a 'pay and download' service if they want to curb the problem.
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