The New Asperger's Syndrome Discussion Thread

    First Previous
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 01:54:37 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Post deleted
  • MiniAmin 28 Sep 2010 02:08:58 3,796 posts
    Seen 3 days ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Any affliction which affects the way you think and behave is subject to an entire new chasm of stigma. I think it's a vestige from dualism, that we often consider something such as Asperger's or depression as an attribute of one's personality rather than an illness. Unfortunately the only solution to this is education.

    Please don't let these insufferable idiots get to you. Their behaviour speaks volumes about their own personalities. I'm very tired so apologies if I come across as blunt. I have a friend who also has Asperger's. I hope the legal sort is all sorte d out in the end.
  • dsmx 28 Sep 2010 02:18:19 8,431 posts
    Seen 14 minutes ago
    Registered 14 years ago
    Your not alone in this you have to fight every step of the way for any assistance with aspergers. Equality is a misnomer since there's such a huge amount of ignorance out there, people find it easier just to moan about how your shit at your job rather than make any effort at their end to help you.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 02:22:27 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I just really hope that the Adult Autism Strategy, when it becomes enforced later this year, leads to positive change. But I can't help but think that if people have such a blase attitude already then it will be equally overlooked, or that any positive change will take years before its effects can be quantitively measured.
  • dsmx 28 Sep 2010 02:25:27 8,431 posts
    Seen 14 minutes ago
    Registered 14 years ago
    The thing that annoys me at the moment is that I have aspergers, I have dyslexia, the report for dyslexia gave me an IQ of 115 . I've had pretty much no support for either mental disorder in my 25 years of life, I still managed to get 3 A2 levels and an AS level and all I have to show for it is a job in Staples restocking shelves basically.

    I know I could do so much more but I'm shit at interviews and just getting an interview in the first place is stupidly difficult. Why does the world make it so difficult to find people who are obviously good at something to get a job?
  • Genji 28 Sep 2010 02:28:48 19,682 posts
    Seen 8 years ago
    Registered 15 years ago
    groovemeister claimed to have Asperger's. He's gone now.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 02:30:52 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I've had pretty much no support for either mental disorder

    We're not disordered dude, we just have a different perspective on things. Clinical consensus is actually moving away from using the term ASD (D - disorder) and towards ASC (C=Condition) for this reason.

    The analogy I like to use is that of people looking through a window. Everyone else looks at it through the same angle, but us Aspies are looking at it from a different angle. As a result, while we are seeing broadly the same scene, small bits of it are outside our field of vision and we are seeing it from a slightly different perspective - we miss some things, but equally other details are more apparent to us than other people.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 02:35:03 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I know I could do so much more but I'm shit at interviews

    Same. Most of my career, I have worked through Temping agencies because they don't tend to conduct interviews before giving you job assignments. The "Positive About Disabled People" scheme helps, where employers commit to interviewing people with disabilities, but then the conduct of the aforementioned c*nts in the NHS undermines that (not to mention that it's pretty damn shocking that the bloody National Health Service would so blatantly discriminate against people with a disability).

    My current position is a 6-month contract, expiring in Jan (with option for renewal depending on review). But I got this mainly on the back of having worked for them as a temp through an agency for a year prior to my current role.

    It's not helped by the fact that most vacancies put "excellent communication skills" down as a job requirement, which instantly discriminates against anyone with AS.
  • dsmx 28 Sep 2010 02:36:18 8,431 posts
    Seen 14 minutes ago
    Registered 14 years ago
    Yeah I'm aware of that but I have to deal with dyslexia and Aspergers, dyslexia is a disorder sadly.
  • Genji 28 Sep 2010 02:36:47 19,682 posts
    Seen 8 years ago
    Registered 15 years ago
    It's a tough one. It's hard to get recognition for many mental conditions, really, but it's especially difficult when one of the possible symptoms can be easily mistaken for someone being an insufferable prick.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 02:45:42 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    It's hard to get recognition for many mental conditions

    In fairness dude, Asperger's isn't a mental illness. It's classed as a "developmental disability". There's currently a large debate going on (mainly being fuelled by the impending new edition of the DSM) that ASC should be categorised completely separately from Mental Illness or Learning Disability.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 02:46:42 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    it's especially difficult when one of the possible symptoms can be easily mistaken for someone being an insufferable prick.

    Agree with this though. It's such a monumental pain in the ass having what is considered to be an "invisible" disability.
  • warlockuk 28 Sep 2010 02:48:57 19,492 posts
    Seen 1 month ago
    Registered 15 years ago
    I think awareness is increasing in some circles of certain ailments - like Aspergers - as so many folks are claiming to have it. Not meaning you here, but there is an increase of late in people claiming to have Aspergers, ADHD and all manner of things possibly just to appear cool / kookie. It's like it isn't cool just to be a little eccentric anymore.

    It's still not that big overall, though .

    And my sympathies for "excellent communication skills" being problematic - but I'd not call it discriminatory if the role genuinely wants communication skills which you may not have.
    Tbh, the interview most of the time though is to make sure the person isn't a dipshit and doesn't creep 'em out too much - the problem is far less in techical roles; you just have to turn up on time, know how to do something and not smell of pee. Though where I work it seems 2 out of 3 is a passing mark.

    *edit - none of this relates to your OP; sounds like they're cockwits. Nasty situation
  • Phily50 28 Sep 2010 02:52:26 2,384 posts
    Seen 5 months ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    I'm not trying to sound in any way offensive , but I'm not entirely sure that I know what Aspergers Syndrome is. Could someone explain?
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 02:52:56 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I'd not call it discriminatory if the role genuinely wants communication skills which you may not have.

    The National Autistic Society published a study last year which specifically mentioned the fact that huge amounts of jobs are being advertised with "excellent communication skills" being posted as a requirement when the job doesn't actually require them specifically. I wasn't suggesting that it was directly (ie intentionally) discriminatory, but more the fact that people with AS or other Autism conditions are far more likely to not apply to them assuming that they are "unwanted", for want of a better term.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 02:54:40 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    @Phily50

    Here you go

    This is by no means representative of everyone though - read it more as a catch-all list of all possible symptoms, rather than a list of what everyone has. Check Wikipedia as well, and there's a lot of other articles on the NAS site about Asperger's and how it varies.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 02:57:13 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I suppose it's easy to misinterperet adults as dismissive or disrespectful, or even hostile.

    Yes, that's half the problem unfortunately. Quite often we are dismissed as being rude, flippant, disrespectful etc when our intentions are anything but. If someone is aware of our difference and how it can affect us, then it's not really a problem (and can even fuel humour, as it does with me and my partner), but if they are not then it can lead to disaster.
  • Phily50 28 Sep 2010 03:01:52 2,384 posts
    Seen 5 months ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    darkmorgado wrote:
    @Phily50

    Here you go

    This is by no means representative of everyone though - read it more as a catch-all list of all possible symptoms, rather than a list of what everyone has. Check Wikipedia as well, and there's a lot of other articles on the NAS site about Asperger's and how it varies.

    Thanks mate. I'm sure I read a book about a boy with Aspergers, I think I was confusing it with something else though. The curious case of the dead dog or something like that I believe it was called.

    Anyway back on topic, the situation the OP describes is indeed a shit one to be in. I really feel for you mate, no one should be subjected to that level of discrimination, disability or not.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 03:03:54 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    ARGH

    that c*nt notmyrealname is PMing me abuse again.

    WHY THE F*CK CAN'T PEOPLE LIKE THIS REALISE WHAT THEY ARE DOING?

    And, more to the point, why can't EG just slap an outright ban on them? I've had it explained to me that an EG ban stops them from commenting on threads but doesn't stop them rating comments or sending PMs. Other sites quite happily hand out outright bans, so why is EG any different, especially if someone is being specifically targeted based on them having a disability?
  • warlockuk 28 Sep 2010 03:04:46 19,492 posts
    Seen 1 month ago
    Registered 15 years ago
    darkmorgado wrote:
    I'd not call it discriminatory if the role genuinely wants communication skills which you may not have.

    The National Autistic Society published a study last year which specifically mentioned the fact that huge amounts of jobs are being advertised with "excellent communication skills" being posted as a requirement when the job doesn't actually require them specifically. I wasn't suggesting that it was directly (ie intentionally) discriminatory, but more the fact that people with AS or other Autism conditions are far more likely to not apply to them assuming that they are "unwanted", for want of a better term.
    Ah, right; fair enough :D
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 03:05:37 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I'm sure I read a book about a boy with Aspergers

    I am guessing you mean "The Curious Incident of the Dog in Night-Time"

    Ignore it. It's stereotypical trash, that is a particular example of the sort of exagerrated media nonsense and stereotyping that goes on around Asperger's. It's on a par with Rain Man, to be honest, and a source of particular derision amongst the Aspie (that's what we call ourselves) community.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 03:07:07 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    An interesting statistic that you probably won't be aware of is that only 15% of adults diagnosed with an ASC are in full-time employment, despite 90% wanting to work.

    That's pretty f*cking shocking, to be honest, and makes me terrified for when my current employment contract comes to an end in Jan.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 03:22:30 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    As clarification of my previous point about "that book", basically the author took every single possible symptom of Asperger's, ramped it up to 11 in terms of severity, then slapped them all on one kid. He then spent interviews acting really smug and arrogantly trying to say he is a f*cking expert on how it affects people.

    As my own consultant likes to say, the only people in the world who are experts in Asperger's are the people who have it.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 03:29:55 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Well yes, but the behaviour exhibited by the kid in that book is completely unrealistic. To be honest, his symptoms as written are more consistent with an incredibly severe case of full-blown Kanner's Syndrome (what is known by most as "classic" autism) than Asperger's, and there is a significant difference between the two diagnoses.
  • mwtb 28 Sep 2010 03:39:05 2,381 posts
    Seen 6 years ago
    Registered 15 years ago
    It's a very difficult scenario for all sides. For an employer it's far more difficult to "accommodate" someone who can't handle social interactions than it is to provide, say, wheelchair accessibility.
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 03:47:22 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I can handle social interaction fine - I just have problems with, say, realising when people are being sarcastic, or inferring indirect meaning to things (tone of voice). A bit of understanding in these areas goes a hell of a long way.

    The major problem is when people assume what you can and can't do, without consulting you or making attempts to educate themselves, and there is a shitload of legislation in place to prevent that occurring which often goes ignored because they assume that unless, say, you are in a wheelchair then you must be "normal".
  • spamdangled 28 Sep 2010 03:51:44 31,761 posts
    Seen 1 hour ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    I also have problems around lack of routine and change, but this tends to be less of a problem in an office environment where things tend to be pretty structured.
  • First Previous
Log in or register to reply

Sometimes posts may contain links to online retail stores. If you click on one and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. For more information, go here.