The New Asperger's Syndrome Discussion Thread Page 24

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  • fontgeeksogood 18 Sep 2018 20:54:45 6,043 posts
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    I'm interested in hearing from anyone with Asperger's who also lifts weight, what's your 1RM it's for a thing to make a point
  • Lukus 18 Sep 2018 22:00:12 21,931 posts
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    Is New Aspergers like New Labour? More central on the spectrum?
  • captain-Snufkin 20 Sep 2018 14:16:28 829 posts
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    Aspergers name has been retired, probably because calling people with crippling social disorders arse burgers wasn't the greatest idea. All goes under autism now.
  • Armoured_Bear 20 Sep 2018 16:13:45 26,678 posts
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    I've heard Arseburgers types say that they don't know how to do "small talk" while chatting away. What exactly is "small talk"?
  • Frogofdoom 20 Sep 2018 16:31:51 13,216 posts
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    Yeah they are all faking it you ignorant cunt.
  • smoothpete 20 Sep 2018 16:35:50 35,755 posts
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    :D
  • glaeken 20 Sep 2018 16:40:09 12,026 posts
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    I think they retired Aspergers due to it becoming an internet diagnosed super power.
  • TheSaint 20 Sep 2018 17:23:27 18,571 posts
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    Armoured_Bear wrote:
    I've heard Arseburgers types say that they don't know how to do "small talk" while chatting away. What exactly is "small talk"?
    Are you really asking what small talk is?
  • Load_2.0 20 Sep 2018 17:28:51 29,322 posts
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    Can we quit it with the heightism and insensitivity in this thread?

    Midgets have normal conversations just like anyone else.
  • Armoured_Bear 20 Sep 2018 17:30:02 26,678 posts
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    TheSaint wrote:
    Armoured_Bear wrote:
    I've heard Arseburgers types say that they don't know how to do "small talk" while chatting away. What exactly is "small talk"?
    Are you really asking what small talk is?
    Yes.
  • Fake_Blood 20 Sep 2018 17:31:07 9,485 posts
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    I think words like syndrome and spectrum are just ways for psychologists to hide the fact that they have no idea how the brain works.
  • JoeBlade 20 Sep 2018 17:57:51 4,368 posts
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    smalltalk is a programming language designed in the 70s, partly for educational purposes.

    It has by far the most opaque and obscure syntax of all programming languages I've used.
    AVOID
  • Your-Mother 20 Sep 2018 18:26:23 2,764 posts
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    Small talk is a type of Taiwanese street food.
  • nickthegun 20 Sep 2018 19:00:14 77,799 posts
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    TheSaint wrote:
    Armoured_Bear wrote:
    I've heard Arseburgers types say that they don't know how to do "small talk" while chatting away. What exactly is "small talk"?
    Are you really asking what small talk is?
    Is it really surprising that no one has ever made it with him?
  • Lukus 20 Sep 2018 19:12:13 21,931 posts
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    What's big talk?
  • Vortex808 20 Sep 2018 19:45:33 13,180 posts
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    Lukus wrote:
    What's big talk?
    When you claim your little Toad is a bigly grower?
  • richarddavies 20 Sep 2018 19:51:37 6,708 posts
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    Bullshit aside, does anyone on here have autism or aspergers? Just need a bit of advice regarding my step daughter. Me and the missus have an inkling she may be on the spectrum but we've not had much help from the nhs as of yet in getting her even seen by someone to get it diagnosed. Been going on for over 6 months now easily. Obviously we've had a look online but don't really like the thought of self diagnosing through Google and just need a bit of help regarding what to look for in regard to behaviours etc.
  • Dougs 20 Sep 2018 19:59:24 89,122 posts
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    Is she at school? That's often the best way, I understand. Provision of care is awful where I live, no local diagnosis is non-existent and a massive back log.
  • richarddavies 20 Sep 2018 20:01:28 6,708 posts
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    Yes she is at school, she's 10 soon. She does have a couple of friends as well that she gets on with too. It's just as you said really, we don't really seem to have any support in our area and were not even sure how much they will help even if she is diagnosed.
  • Deleted user 20 September 2018 20:14:10
    Think it's harder work getting a diagnosis once they are already in mainstream school. 2 of my daughter's got diagnosed at age 2 and 3 so everything was put in place beforehand and they now attend a specialist school which is just for Autism.
  • captain-Snufkin 20 Sep 2018 20:16:50 829 posts
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    I'd imagined half the people here are autistic aren't they? I certainly am.

    It's just the way some people are. I'd especially reassure her the world isn't geared up to her and that's the problem when she becomes inevitably frustrated/depressed, especially in her teenage years.

    Edited by captain-Snufkin at 20:18:46 20-09-2018
  • Frogofdoom 20 Sep 2018 20:37:33 13,216 posts
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    Would like to tell you it's easy Richard but it isn't, you have to push and push for a cahms referral. We used to have to have the police and ambulance crews out regularly for months before we could get anywhere near cahms. He used to have violent rage fits on a daily basis and destroyed loads of the house including the front door and every internal door. You literally have to fight tooth and nail to get near them and that was with a recommendation from the ed pysch.

    YMMV depending on where you are but services have got worse since we got any help so it's not easy.

    Have the school raised any concerns with you?
  • mothercruncher 20 Sep 2018 21:15:17 16,197 posts
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    Jesus Frog- thatís rough.
  • Frogofdoom 20 Sep 2018 21:20:46 13,216 posts
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    Heh, that's a small fraction of what we have been through mate, I adore my son and he means the world to me but my parenthood experience has been quite different to most people.
  • Dougs 20 Sep 2018 21:41:35 89,122 posts
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    How's the blood pressure?!

    All jokes to one side, that must be tough. Parenting's hard enough without needing to manage that.
  • Salaman 20 Sep 2018 22:04:22 23,614 posts
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    Frogofdoom wrote:
    Yeah they are all faking it you ignorant cunt.
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-feBTSrTSWGE/UDlhmsreUBI/AAAAAAAAUyQ/kzsrtTnbABY/s1600/cup.jpg
  • Frogofdoom 20 Sep 2018 22:06:52 13,216 posts
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    I literally have no idea what normal parenting entails to be honest mate, I only have the one and couldnt actually comprehend doing it all again(too old now anyway). Surprisingly I'm in really good health, there have been moments of brutal anxiety and depression but you just manage, there isn't really an alternative so you just get on with it.
  • Salaman 20 Sep 2018 22:11:40 23,614 posts
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    Dougs wrote:
    How's the blood pressure?!

    All jokes to one side, that must be tough. Parenting's hard enough without needing to manage that.
    We were on holiday in Spain at the end of August and there was an English couple by the pool from 10am until 4 or 5pm everyday.

    Their son seemed about 10-12 and he had some form of tantrum 3,4 or 5 times every day.
    The patience they had to calmly talk him down and make him settle down again each and every time. I can't imagine how testing and stressful that must be. And you probably need a thick skin to not get too worked up or embarrassed with your son kicking off a few times a day with an audience of one or two dozen other holiday guests around.

    It was quite an eye opener.
  • ZuluHero 20 Sep 2018 23:06:57 7,396 posts
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    Cahms is the way to go. We got a referral from a GP, with references from the school social worker. My 11 year old daughter has a diagnosis of ASD with Pda (pathological demand avoidance) which was identified when she was 4. She's been with Cahms awhile now, seeing a Child Psychologist to help her deal with some of the crippling anxiety she gets. Her meltdowns are epic. Shockingly violent. She's like 2 different girls. I'm sad to admit that I didn't handle them well when she was younger, now I'm much calmer, you do learn to be very patient. To be fair the frequency of the meltdowns have lessened a lot as she's gotten older.

    The thing I struggle with the most is the seemingly arbitrary triggers. There is no logic to it, no rational cause-and-effect, but there are triggers even if you can't deduce what. The problem is as a parent you are expected to know what these are. I've come to call this 3-strikes, as in I get 3 tries to try to figure out the problem before the meltdown triggers. Of course, this is a catch-22 because trying to figure out the problem also feeds the issue.

    Like frog said, I'd never go through it again, it is mentally and physically exhausting, far beyond what you'd expect to go through as a parent. I remember the words of a doctor we saw in the very early days, he had five children and his last one had similar issues to ours. He said that if he'd had her first, he wouldn't have had any more either. That really struck a chord.

    Things are mostly better, she has good days and bad, we seem to be having a spell of bad at the moment, which was triggered by something that happened last Saturday. One common thing about autistic people is the constant reliving of bad experiences or events that viciously self-perpetuate, amplifying, like a terrible feedback loop and this often manifests in a meltdown or as they get older a complete shutdown, or more often one, then the other.

    I'm hoping things will get better, she is learning to cope and I think working things through with the child psychologist at Cahms is helping but I feel like while we've come a long way we still have a long way to go.

    Though I do worry sometimes about how she'll cope as she grows up.

    Edited by ZuluHero at 23:14:23 20-09-2018
  • christourlord 21 Sep 2018 11:47:43 2,674 posts
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    Our 4-y-o was diagnosed just as his little brother was turning 1. Like others have said, it's a very painful process getting a diagnosis / EHCP for school, but depends massively on the resources available in your area. Our son has been in private speech and occupational therapy on and off since he was 3 (now nearly 5) and has just started at a mainstream school, which so far has been excellent despite being massively underfunded and understaffed in the learning support department.

    Having a second son who is seemingly neurotypical (so far) is a very strange experience. All the parenting mechanisms we developed for our first simply don't apply. It's a tough balancing act when they both require such different forms of guidance & discipline. Fuck knows how we will all get along when they are going through puberty and everything changes again.

    Edited by christourlord at 11:48:11 21-09-2018
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