Learning to code. Page 7

  • MMMarmite 8 May 2014 18:28:36 1,604 posts
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    I'd take a look at Wordpress to see if it works for you but also look at other similar software. The size and popularity of WP makes it quite a large target and if you don't keep it secure you could find your site defaced or worse.

    If the site is quite small, not too complex and not frequently updated you could easily get away with a couple of php includes instead of using a full CMS.
  • THFourteen 12 Nov 2016 07:19:59 53,174 posts
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    Hey anyone got any opinions on this?

    https://www.udemy.com/unitycourse/

    Looks like there's a coupon to get it for 50 today. I've always wanted to learn to code games (just for fun), did learn java at uni but they was like 15 years ago.
  • Deleted user 12 November 2016 07:32:58
    They can't teach drive and how to get more spare time. That's all anyone needs these days to learn 'coding' (or a foreign language come to that)
  • rice_sandwich 12 Nov 2016 07:59:58 6,052 posts
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    Looks like the kind of stuff that most 'learn to code' books teach you. Pretty much the basics of programming. I suppose 19 is as much as you'd pay for a book on the topic. Certainly nothing there that you won't find for free on various web sites and youtube videos.
  • THFourteen 12 Nov 2016 08:25:27 53,174 posts
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    I guess I like the idea of having a structured course so I can see progression. Plus the instructor is english...
  • HitchHiker 12 Nov 2016 08:44:58 2,891 posts
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    All you need is iTunes.

    iTunesU, available to anyone with iTunes installed, has thousands of courses and classes, some very highly structured with downloadable files and all. Not just on programming either.
  • THFourteen 12 Nov 2016 19:56:28 53,174 posts
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    Fuck it, found a better code, 10 for the course. Bought.

    (This one if anyone wants http://www.couponism.com/coupons/Upto-99-Discount-on-Udemy-Courses-)

    Now off to play Civ.

    Edited by THFourteen at 19:56:43 12-11-2016
  • MrTomFTW Best Moderator, 2016 12 Nov 2016 23:17:08 47,498 posts
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    I would have suggested tutorials on YouTube. It's what I've been doing.
  • Dirtbox 12 Nov 2016 23:37:38 91,214 posts
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    Post deleted
  • Tonka 13 Nov 2016 08:04:52 30,080 posts
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    Biggest challenge with learning to code is to set a realistic scope for your project.

    A guy at work always start by making a to do list when trying new frameworks but that's a bit boring if it's games you want to do. Start out by making pong, asteroids or break out.

    All the tutorials you need will be on blogs and YouTube.
  • cjb_bjc 24 Nov 2016 11:52:44 2,099 posts
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    Been trying to get back into blogging a bit. Works been manic, but went to a really good meetup the other days with speakers from Chef and Google talking through their products.

    If it's of interest to anyone, I've put a piece up here: Chef, Kubernetes and Meetups
  • THFourteen 24 Nov 2016 14:11:54 53,174 posts
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    I bought that course in the end, cost me 10 in the sales. Done quite a bit already and although there might be equivalent courses on youtube or whatever, I'm enjoying it so far.

    Built a text adventure, and then a number guessing game.

    Now on to building an arkanoid clone. So far got the ball bouncing around and hitting and destroying bricks, its not pretty but it works!

    it's been a long time since I did any coding (I used to code vb in the late 90s, and learned java at uni 1998-2001) but I never knew anything about game development.

    I'm surprised (but maybe it should have been obvious) about the amount of stuff built into a kit like Unity, in terms of physics engines and whatnot.

    What I'm building now is not so far off what I used to do in VB, dragging objects onto a playspace and then adding a bit of code to the backend
  • cjb_bjc 25 Nov 2016 11:20:09 2,099 posts
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    @THFourteen

    Any of this available to try?
  • Phattso 25 Nov 2016 11:55:32 24,935 posts
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    Don't want to frighten you, THFourteen, but you'd be able to get something running for your Rift with almost no effort if you wanted to. I know that this would involve, y'know, using the Rift, but if you can put that terror to one side you might enjoy yourself. ;)

    If it's Unity you're using I'd be happy to put together an example project for you to then muck about in. When you're far enough into your course that you're comfortable, obv. You could build an Arkanoid clone that tracks hand position, for example, with you looking up at the wall above. IMAGINE!
  • cjb_bjc 25 Nov 2016 14:24:24 2,099 posts
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    I think I might try out this unity malarkey. Wanted to make an android game for ages and now that the engine is free, and removes all that painful stuff I might jump in.

    If there's anything anyone has found overly useful would be great to have a list to get through
  • Phattso 25 Nov 2016 14:30:03 24,935 posts
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    It's perhaps too obvious to say it, but Unity themselves have YouTube vids of every conference they've ever put on. Many have a codebase and you can "play along" with the presenter as they build some pretty amazing stuff. My opening gambit when originally getting into Unity about two years ago was to follow on their isometric 3D twinstick shooter tutorial.

    I do have a programming backdrop, including games for a few years, so YMMV but I found it a cinch and really useful.

    Here's a link to get you started: https://unity3d.com/learn/tutorials/projects/survival-shooter-tutorial


    There are simpler things, for sure, but I loved that this one got you somewhere quite advanced quite quickly. And, since they give you the whole project, you can dissect it at your own pace.
  • convz 25 Nov 2016 14:48:26 1,139 posts
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    Dirtbox wrote:
    Youtube has taught me more than anything, it's an incredible resource for pretty much anything you want to learn.

    Here's C++ in a single video, with a few caveats, like you must already have a grasp of syntax and libraries before you can really get the most out of it, but whatever.

    Thanks, I'm currently at a very weird stage with programming and am looking for something to inspire me again, so I'll give this a watch :) Doing a lot of C# at the moment (.NET) and find it utterly soul destroying.

    I saw this posted to Reddit recently too which looks very good (and free!) for anyone wanting to get into web stuff: http://upskillcourses.com/

    Edited by convz at 14:50:53 25-11-2016
  • convz 25 Nov 2016 14:49:38 1,139 posts
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    Phattso wrote:
    Don't want to frighten you, THFourteen, but you'd be able to get something running for your Rift with almost no effort if you wanted to. I know that this would involve, y'know, using the Rift, but if you can put that terror to one side you might enjoy yourself. ;)

    If it's Unity you're using I'd be happy to put together an example project for you to then muck about in. When you're far enough into your course that you're comfortable, obv. You could build an Arkanoid clone that tracks hand position, for example, with you looking up at the wall above. IMAGINE!
    This sounds incredible :o I don't have a PC that's even close to being able to run VR, but this is definitely something I'd love to look into in the future.
  • Deleted user 25 November 2016 14:54:46
    Is VR vegan
  • Phattso 25 Nov 2016 14:55:20 24,935 posts
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    If all you want to do is tool around with VR, you can get away with a much lower spec. Homegrown efforts are never gonna need the grunt that a AAA title would. Something very humble could run a homebrew Arkanoid or whatever. Whether you'd spend 500+ to make Arkanoid, however.... ;)
  • Phattso 25 Nov 2016 14:55:44 24,935 posts
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    PES_Fanboy wrote:
    Is VR vegan
    Virtually.
  • convz 25 Nov 2016 15:05:46 1,139 posts
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    Heh PES :)

    Thanks Phattso, that sounds great! I was leaning towards PSVR, but the thought of being able to develop VR games is incredible, even if they are super simple (I mean, making a VR Arkanoid would be the dream!) - when I eventually take the plunge into VR I'll definitely go with a PC option, thank you!

    Edited by convz at 15:06:58 25-11-2016
  • THFourteen 25 Nov 2016 20:00:26 53,174 posts
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    cjb_bjc wrote:
    @THFourteen

    Any of this available to try?
    There's not much to "try" there's a preview on the udemy website you can look at and get a feel for the lecturers style and presentation skills if that suits you. For what its worth I am enjoying it, and the 10 was not missed. Think there is still a sale on so you can buy the same course for 15 if you want. Apparently RRP is 195 but i doubt anyone ever paid that much for it.
  • THFourteen 25 Nov 2016 20:01:27 53,174 posts
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    Phattso wrote:
    Don't want to frighten you, THFourteen, but you'd be able to get something running for your Rift with almost no effort if you wanted to. I know that this would involve, y'know, using the Rift, but if you can put that terror to one side you might enjoy yourself. ;)

    If it's Unity you're using I'd be happy to put together an example project for you to then muck about in. When you're far enough into your course that you're comfortable, obv. You could build an Arkanoid clone that tracks hand position, for example, with you looking up at the wall above. IMAGINE!
    Heh awesome. I did see a unity course on VR also on udemy, was tempted to get it on sale but decided to wait to see how far i got with my existing course before spending any money on it.
  • MMMarmite 25 Nov 2016 20:20:57 1,604 posts
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    THFourteen wrote:
    cjb_bjc wrote:
    @THFourteen

    Any of this available to try?
    There's not much to "try" there's a preview on the udemy website you can look at and get a feel for the lecturers style and presentation skills if that suits you. For what its worth I am enjoying it, and the 10 was not missed. Think there is still a sale on so you can buy the same course for 15 if you want. Apparently RRP is 195 but i doubt anyone ever paid that much for it.
    It's just a case of waiting, if you miss the 15 sale today there'll be another at Christmas, probably New Years too and maybe any weekend before or after then. I bought this course and another on udemy and get emails every week offering me more courses at way under the supposed RRP.

    This course is pretty decent, but it's basically learning by building a bunch of clones so can be a bit slow at times.
  • ghostgate2001 25 Nov 2016 22:00:33 667 posts
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    Good to see people here taking an interest in learning to code :)

    I learned the same way most kids of my era (the 80s) learned: typing in listings from magazines! They hardly ever worked first time, due to my typos or magazine mis-prints, so in a very natural way you found yourself picking apart the code to try to work out what was going wrong ... which led to understanding how code works ... and it's only a short hop and a skip from that to writing your own code, building up a little library of routines so you don't reinvent the wheel every time, and so on.

    Times have changed, but the learning process remains very similar: I'd recommend starting out by picking apart someone else's code - like demo projects in Unity - and just try to make very simple modifications to those existing projects. Add something. Alter the behaviour of something. That sort of thing. And before long you'll have a decent grasp of the basics.

    The main things to bear in mind with any project, I'd say, are planning - define what you're trying to create and avoid "making it up as you go along" - and remembering not to bite off more than you can chew.

    Projects always end up being more complex than you think they will be, so set yourself a manageable challenge - like creating your own remake of a simple 8-bit retro game that you loved. That's the kind of thing I do whenever I'm feeling rusty: pick some ultra-simple old Atari VCS or BBC Micro (!) game and try to knock up a remake in a few days. Every game, no matter how simple, throws up fresh coding problems to solve so it's all useful. "Quick wins" like that always manage to oil my gears and get the coding flowing again :)
  • Armoured_Bear 25 Nov 2016 22:02:00 27,867 posts
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    MrTomFTW wrote:
    I would have suggested tutorials on YouTube. It's what I've been doing.
    Yep, it's awesome.
    I've been a Software Engineer for 20 years and it's what I've found most useful when trying to pick up new stuff.
  • Phattso 25 Nov 2016 22:30:55 24,935 posts
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    @THFourteen you know how there's a camera in the tutorials you've been following? Welp... just drag and drop the Rift Camera Prefab and LO! VR! It's actually that simple. :)
  • cjb_bjc 25 Nov 2016 23:58:34 2,099 posts
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    @THFourteen

    By try, I meant was there anything you have made that we could have a go on. Even if it's pre alpha. Getting suggestions on board will help spur you on an also improve the hand itself.
  • senso-ji 26 Nov 2016 11:20:30 9,987 posts
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    One of the best resources is stack overflow, especially if you want to learn the more popular languages like java, javascript and c#.
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