Following Outer space and related interests Page 21

  • RunningMan 27 Mar 2019 18:54:56 2,975 posts
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    How are they going to do this if they've cancelled the heavy lift version of the SLS?
  • up_the_ante 27 Mar 2019 21:03:14 1,099 posts
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    “ We will go to the Moon in the next decade in a way we have never gone before.”
    Ummmm...unless they're planning to rebuild a Saturn V and an Apollo lander any way they go will be a way they've never gone before.
  • KnuttinAtoll 9 Apr 2019 21:31:15 7,407 posts
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    Mindboggling stuff happening tomorrow:

    https://www.space.com/event-horizon-telescope-is-trying-to-photograph-black-holes.html
  • Fake_Blood 9 Apr 2019 21:42:05 9,682 posts
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    There’s a falcon heavy launch planned for tomorrow too.
  • ZuluHero 9 Apr 2019 21:51:30 7,534 posts
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    It'll be interesting, but distant space photography never lives up to the hype. I don't think it helps when they lead with artist impressions.
  • DakeyrasUK 10 Apr 2019 15:40:41 2,985 posts
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    Outstanding achievement!

  • wobbly_Bob 10 Apr 2019 15:48:24 5,144 posts
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    @DakeyrasUK

    Amazing. What a time to be alive. This is an incredible first for humanity.
  • Fake_Blood 10 Apr 2019 15:49:13 9,682 posts
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    Strange, I was lead to believe it was going to be full of bookcases.

    It’s amazing that we have the technical ability to make such a picture, what’s even more amazing to me is that these were predicted by guys using nothing more than a sheet of paper and a pencil and just thinking really hard about the laws of nature. Yay science \o/
  • DJCopa 10 Apr 2019 15:50:12 2,009 posts
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    The numbers involved for size, brightness, etc. are just too much for my brain to comprehend - Amazing!
  • DakeyrasUK 10 Apr 2019 15:51:17 2,985 posts
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    That is what I love so much about it.

    It so well represents what was predicted 100 years ago.

    Can't wait to share this with my a level physics pupils after the holidays!
  • DakeyrasUK 10 Apr 2019 15:53:37 2,985 posts
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    50 micro arc seconds across... That is 50 millionths of 1/3600 of a degree of the night sky....

    There is so much out there!

  • sport 10 Apr 2019 15:56:30 15,184 posts
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    Bit blurry though. Clearly the telescope isn't steady enough.
  • DJCopa 10 Apr 2019 15:57:19 2,009 posts
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    @DakeyrasUK Frightening, but in a positive way!
  • Armoured_Bear 10 Apr 2019 16:01:03 27,362 posts
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    Mind blowing stuff.
  • Fake_Blood 10 Apr 2019 16:02:01 9,682 posts
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    sport wrote:
    Bit blurry though. Clearly the telescope isn't steady enough.
    They forgot to turn on the flash.
  • AboutHalfaStevas 10 Apr 2019 16:04:08 1,847 posts
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    sport wrote:
    Bit blurry though. Clearly the telescope isn't steady enough.
    Science forgot to ask everyone to stay still while they took the pic.
  • GuybrushFreepwood 10 Apr 2019 16:25:30 1,267 posts
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    sport wrote:
    Bit blurry though. Clearly the telescope isn't steady enough.
    Nearly spat my drink out after reading that :)
  • CrispyXUKTurbo 10 Apr 2019 16:59:02 2,051 posts
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    Found this to be a good explanation of what we're 'seeing'.
  • ZuluHero 10 Apr 2019 17:01:40 7,534 posts
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    Here's a better one:



    :)
  • DakeyrasUK 10 Apr 2019 23:04:13 2,985 posts
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    Cool mini documentary about the world wide collaboration.

  • fontgeeksogood 11 Apr 2019 06:02:25 6,775 posts
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    Elaborate way to clickbait a Goatse
  • Fake_Blood 11 Apr 2019 09:33:23 9,682 posts
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    No one called the hole sexy, forum is really going downhill.
  • DJCopa 11 Apr 2019 12:28:05 2,009 posts
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    Anyone watch the full documentary on BB4 last night?

    Really interesting seeing how they linked up all the satellites and how they got the final images, from running various lines of code/math.
  • ZuluHero 11 Apr 2019 13:08:30 7,534 posts
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    So why did they take a photo of the centre of that galaxy and not a closer one?

    Was it just because is was supermassive?

    Edited by ZuluHero at 13:08:49 11-04-2019
  • AboutHalfaStevas 11 Apr 2019 13:16:03 1,847 posts
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    I believe it was just the best candidate for orientation (closer ones are more "edge on", so there's more mass obscuring any view of the centre - including our own).
  • GuybrushFreepwood 11 Apr 2019 13:25:06 1,267 posts
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    @ZuluHero Yep. They needed a big one (supermassive) as these have such a huge gravitational force that nothing including light can escape from them. This leads to the creation of the halo as matter including photons are dragged around the black hole. The theory is that the supermassive black holes are located at the centre of galaxies.

    They are trying to take a photo of the one believed to be at the centre of the milky way.
  • Zerobob 11 Apr 2019 13:51:37 2,252 posts
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    This is the exact question I was asking myself throughout the BBC4 documentary last night... Why was it necessary to view a black hole so far away, if they're considered to be present at the centre of most or all galaxies, including our own galaxy?

    This is one of the most fundamental aspects of the problem they were attempting to solve, and the reason they needed to construct such a vast and complicated telescope array, yet was left completely unaddressed.

    I mean, I have a casual interest in astronomy, so I suspected they needed a large black hole that wasn't obscured by stars in the galactic center, but the documentary never confirmed this. Really poor considering it was a BBC documentary.
  • Fake_Blood 11 Apr 2019 14:07:37 9,682 posts
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    Thing is, we’re in the disk of our galaxy, and there’s a shitload of gas and dust between us and the galactic center, plus is an average sized massive black hole that isn’t very active, there is not a lot of stuff falling in right now.
    The one in M87 is much bigger and very active.
  • DJCopa 11 Apr 2019 14:07:53 2,009 posts
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    I thought the reason was they had 2 'spots in the sky' where they could see stars moving erratically so best guess they would point the cluster there.

    Quite a lot of time/money involved, so they pointed it at the biggest potential Black Hole, with the best chance of getting results.
  • Fake_Blood 11 Apr 2019 14:14:37 9,682 posts
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    What blew my mind is that each telescope collects 350TB of data per day. And the fastest way to transmit that data is to send a bunch of HDDs by plane to the processing center.
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