Following Outer space and related interests Page 22

    Next Last
  • DJCopa 11 Apr 2019 14:20:10 2,027 posts
    Seen 17 seconds ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    Yeah, old school :)

    Measurements involved getting it all aligned with each other as well, truly mind-boggling.

    Can't wait to see what else they will look for now.
  • Zerobob 11 Apr 2019 14:45:14 2,260 posts
    Seen 9 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    I felt like they were doing things on a relatively "shoestring" budget, and if they'd had the backing of a tech giant things would have been a fair bit easier for the team.

    I felt annoyed that they were trying to solve such fundamental issues as cooling their drives due to overheating, scrapping around using basic PC fans and fashioning pieces of metal to direct airflow.

    I also felt that when the final team were "workshopping" trying to visually interpret the data they were really just flying blind trying to get consistent results. When more research is done into how to visually process the masses of data I think we'll get some truly crisp and spectacular images.
  • Fake_Blood 11 Apr 2019 14:53:48 9,729 posts
    Seen 22 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    If you think about it, they go from petabytes if data to a picture that has a resolution of what looks to me as 320x240, weighing in at a couple of kilobytes.
  • DJCopa 11 Apr 2019 14:56:50 2,027 posts
    Seen 17 seconds ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    That last bit did confuse me a little, regards how they 'created' the image but guess it's just my understanding is limited. Run a variety of calculations until one continually fits what you are looking for, seemed to be the gist.

    And yes, the show string budget (in relative terms) was highlighted by the heating issue. That is what made it all the more amazing, in my eyes - a group of observatories pulling together for a common aim, with no immediate financial gain.
  • Fake_Blood 11 Apr 2019 15:33:18 9,729 posts
    Seen 22 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Apparently, the further the telescopes are spaced out, the better the resolution is. Which makes me think we should probably get one of those dishes on the moon.
  • RyanDS 11 Apr 2019 15:33:52 12,882 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    As an amateur astronomer I do the following to create the following image:
    Around an hour of set up per night.
    Around 50 photos of 60 second exposure each.
    50 black photos of 60 second exposure each with the lens cap on. (To remove electrical charge from the processed photo)
    Around 30 flat photos (of a white screen) to identify differences in luminosity across the image.

    Then stacking of files, layering, processing etc can be a weeks work. And that is just to get a pretty crappy image. Extrapolating the work I do for that to the work involved in getting the black hole picture genuinely leaves me astounded.

    https://imgur.com/a/JwgUFDX
  • Fake_Blood 11 Apr 2019 16:05:28 9,729 posts
    Seen 22 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    Shut up that looks absolutely amazing Ryan.
    I have wanted a telescope for ages, but we have so much light pollution here in Belgium that I would have to drive to the Ardennes to see anything.
  • grey_matters 11 Apr 2019 16:07:35 4,817 posts
    Seen 33 minutes ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    RyanDS wrote:
    As an amateur astronomer I do the following to create the following image:
    Around an hour of set up per night.
    Around 50 photos of 60 second exposure each.
    50 black photos of 60 second exposure each with the lens cap on. (To remove electrical charge from the processed photo)
    Around 30 flat photos (of a white screen) to identify differences in luminosity across the image.

    Then stacking of files, layering, processing etc can be a weeks work. And that is just to get a pretty crappy image. Extrapolating the work I do for that to the work involved in getting the black hole picture genuinely leaves me astounded.

    https://imgur.com/a/JwgUFDX
    Nice image!

    Why 50 with the cap on? Does the sensor sensitivity vary spatially over time? Do you have to do a cool down period?

    Edited by grey_matters at 16:08:03 11-04-2019
  • Fake_Blood 11 Apr 2019 16:11:02 9,729 posts
    Seen 22 minutes ago
    Registered 10 years ago
    http://thismustbebelgium.com/belgium-spotted-space/

    I find it totally ironic that we are called “bright belgium” btw.
  • RyanDS 11 Apr 2019 16:21:09 12,882 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    Even with the light pollution you can still see some wonderful stuff. I took all of mine in London just by Gatwick airport. I am proud of them, but am aware that compared to the serious stuff they lack.


    Even if you stick to planets and the moon there is so much great stuff to see even with a cheap telescope. My pics were with £2000 of kit, but a telescope like this is great for visual viewing...https://www.amazon.co.uk/Celestron-31045-AstroMaster-Reflector-Telescope/dp/B000MLL6RS/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=1KU748RHX3BSL&keywords=celestron+astromaster+130eq&qid=1554996054&s=gateway&sprefix=celestron+%2Caps%2C398&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1

    Also some more of my pics... https://ryandsimmons6.imgur.com/all/
  • RyanDS 11 Apr 2019 16:35:10 12,882 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    grey_matters wrote:
    RyanDS wrote:
    As an amateur astronomer I do the following to create the following image:
    Around an hour of set up per night.
    Around 50 photos of 60 second exposure each.
    50 black photos of 60 second exposure each with the lens cap on. (To remove electrical charge from the processed photo)
    Around 30 flat photos (of a white screen) to identify differences in luminosity across the image.

    Then stacking of files, layering, processing etc can be a weeks work. And that is just to get a pretty crappy image. Extrapolating the work I do for that to the work involved in getting the black hole picture genuinely leaves me astounded.

    https://imgur.com/a/JwgUFDX
    Nice image!

    Why 50 with the cap on? Does the sensor sensitivity vary spatially over time? Do you have to do a cool down period?
    In some detail. You need flats, biases and darks. (And actual images.)

    After spending an hour getting tracking working (the sky moves FAST. If you don't have a motor lined up correctly tracking the stars you have maybe 10 seconds max exposure.)

    You take normal pics. (Many so you can stack them.)

    Darks are taken exactly the same as the normal pics, but with the lens on. Same orientation, temperature etc. Using software you can then see what is in the dark images (static, misfiring pixels etc) and remove those from your actual images. This is extremely important as noise can be 5% of your image, and at the same time really faint stars or nebula are maybe 5% as well. So you need to have the darks to see what is real. (5% is made up, but you get the point.)

    Flats are taken of a plain white screen. This is purely to see camera light distribution Usually your telescope will reflect light brighter to some areas so you need to flatten out the luminosity. (See https://images.app.goo.gl/TbMmNZ5dqopiWWym8 as an example.) By combining flats with raw data you now have a smoothed out image.


    You then take bias frames, hundreds of these, as fast as your camera allows. I can't remember the reason... Static again?


    Finally you combine everything and end up something like this. (Well this hasn't been flattened, you can see the one side is too bright, but is an example.) https://imgur.com/gallery/qbzmkR2

    Then you edit the shit out of it. Reduce brightness in the middle (so show detail) while adding brightness on the edge (to show stars.) Sharpen stars, use algorithems to make stars round etc.

    No astronomy picture is "true" unless just stars. Anything with a nebula or such will at the minimum have the brightness fucked around with insanely. To see a nebula you need loooong exposures. But that means any bright stars will look like the sun. So you darken the stars to make them look natural, bring out the nebula and generally play around with the light curves for ages.
  • grey_matters 11 Apr 2019 16:45:05 4,817 posts
    Seen 33 minutes ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    @RyanDS

    Thanks! Again, nice work.
  • ZuluHero 11 Apr 2019 18:16:54 7,562 posts
    Seen 3 hours ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    Someone did this on Imgur, made me smile...

    https://m.imgur.com/gallery/aaUW8o8
  • wobbly_Bob 11 Apr 2019 19:05:41 5,144 posts
    Seen 1 month ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    @RyanDS

    Fantastic photo! That looks amazing. Great work.
  • wobbly_Bob 11 Apr 2019 19:08:13 5,144 posts
    Seen 1 month ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    Space X launching it's falcon heavy tonight. It's the first commercial launch. They are gong for a triple booster landing.
  • KRadiation 2 May 2019 10:29:02 1,472 posts
    Seen 7 hours ago
    Registered 11 years ago
    https://youtu.be/DPfHHls50-w


    just caught the tail end of a live launch and landing of SpaceX a few minute ago. currently counting down to another launch now. 8 minutes off.

    Edited by KRadiation at 10:29:47 02-05-2019
  • up_the_ante 11 May 2019 03:06:16 1,119 posts
    Seen 19 minutes ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    I was just thinking that the new series of Cosmos should have surfaced by now. Googled it to find out when it was coming and found this

    https://variety.com/2019/tv/news/cosmos-season-2-premiere-date-neil-degrasse-tyson-1203141146/

    FFS! If this gets canned because he wanted to see if Pluto was on her tattoo...
  • Dougs 28 Jun 2019 18:22:29 90,559 posts
    Seen 16 minutes ago
    Registered 17 years ago
    Wow.

    Apollo 11 tapes bought for $218 may sell for millions after nearly being lost

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jun/28/apollo-11-tapes-moon-landing-sale-value-nearly-lost
  • up_the_ante 28 Jun 2019 18:37:25 1,119 posts
    Seen 19 minutes ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    @Dougs Did they not auction a bag used to bring moon rock back by mistake? Went for some ridiculously low price and still had moon dust inside
  • wobbly_Bob 28 Jun 2019 21:46:08 5,144 posts
    Seen 1 month ago
    Registered 13 years ago
    Dragonfly drone to explore Titan. Very, very exciting. The only thing that would be more exciting that we could do with out existing technology is exploring Europa's oceans.

    https://cosmosmagazine.com/space/nasa-is-going-back-to-titan-looking-for-signs-of-life
  • Dirtbox 6 Aug 2019 13:26:12 91,192 posts
    Seen 16 hours ago
    Registered 17 years ago
    Worth a giggle. Israel accidentally created a colony on the moon.
    https://www.wired.com/story/a-crashed-israeli-lunar-lander-spilled-tardigrades-on-the-moon/
  • ChocNut 6 Aug 2019 13:54:38 2,467 posts
    Seen 11 hours ago
    Registered 16 years ago
    @Dirtbox cool
  • TechnoHippy 11 Oct 2019 15:04:22 15,435 posts
    Seen 1 minute ago
    Registered 16 years ago
    British spider moon rover announced - https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/plans-for-first-uk-rover-to-the-moon/
  • Decks Best Forumite, 2016 11 Oct 2019 15:19:30 21,074 posts
    Seen 2 minutes ago
    Registered 4 years ago
    The fools. You never go to the spider moon.
  • Khanivor 11 Oct 2019 16:50:32 44,110 posts
    Seen 21 minutes ago
    Registered 18 years ago
    TechnoHippy wrote:
    British spider moon rover announced - https://ukdefencejournal.org.uk/plans-for-first-uk-rover-to-the-moon/
    Will this blow up at launch or crash on landing?
  • JoeBlade 11 Oct 2019 18:41:15 4,495 posts
    Seen 9 hours ago
    Registered 17 years ago
    Decks wrote:
    The fools. You never go to the spider moon.
    That's no moon!
  • Next Last
Log in or register to reply

Sometimes posts may contain links to online retail stores. If you click on one and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. For more information, go here.