Advice on house hunting Page 235

  • quadfather 8 Oct 2018 13:15:51 33,433 posts
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    @the_milkybar_kid

    No worries. Let me have a look through them and get the issue numbers for you
  • the_milkybar_kid 8 Oct 2018 13:33:44 7,739 posts
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    @quadfather Ace! Thanks mate :D
  • Nexus_6 8 Oct 2018 16:10:56 4,065 posts
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    @Rhaegyr Rockwool is a mineral fibre insulation, Kingspan is a rigid, PIR type insulation.

    Generally, PIR is more efficient, it has a lower thermal conductivity - you will meet a target u-value in a thinner build-up with Kingspan than Rockwool.
    So if you have say a maximum 150mm deep roof joist and you want to minimise your heat loss, Kingspan is the better bet.
    Rockwool is arguably better for the environment and as you say cheaper.

    Bear in mind though, as with all insulation work, please ensure you are following all installaion details, and most importantly providing adequate ventilation within the build-up!
  • Nexus_6 8 Oct 2018 16:12:02 4,065 posts
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    @Psychotext Bum. I ask because that fault sounds like the same from my 5 year old Worcester. The firing unit had worn down but was easily replaced...
  • Psychotext 10 Oct 2018 12:35:56 64,150 posts
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    I've not shared any photos in a while...



    Yay.
  • quadfather 10 Oct 2018 12:56:29 33,433 posts
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    The fuck happened there?!
  • fontgeeksogood 10 Oct 2018 13:00:23 3,670 posts
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    Someone stole his boiler
  • mrpon 10 Oct 2018 13:17:41 34,837 posts
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    Wow! WOW! Hope they didn't drill through the wiring :rolleyes:

    For those sockets underneath.

    Edited by mrpon at 13:18:00 10-10-2018
  • Psychotext 10 Oct 2018 13:50:33 64,150 posts
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    That's what's left after they took away the damaged cupboard.

    Quality workmanship.
  • Rhaegyr 10 Oct 2018 14:00:47 4,634 posts
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    @Nexus_6

    Thanks very much for the reply!
  • Nexus_6 10 Oct 2018 14:03:41 4,065 posts
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    I see the metal clamps for hanging the cupboard on are still there.
    I see the line of what i presume was silicone down the right where they didnt score it to break the seal.
    I see the insulation behind the plasterboard, and I see the cable pulled up tearing more plasterboard.
    I see the hole below the left hand clip.

    What I don't see in any of these areas is any pattressing or extra stud work to take the cupboard fixing, which suggests to me that the cupboards are only screwed on to a sheet of plasterboard...?

    If so - I wouldn't be storing any of those fancy porcelain mugs or nice heavy dishes in there. Paper plates and maybe some napkins only!
  • Nexus_6 10 Oct 2018 14:05:00 4,065 posts
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    @Rhaegyr No worries dude - my bug bear is builders adding insulation without the necessary ventilation.

    Let me know how you get on
  • Rhaegyr 10 Oct 2018 14:21:15 4,634 posts
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    @Nexus_6

    My roofer (a good mate) definitely impressed the importance of adequate ventilation to avoid condensation.

    We've decided to insulate the floor of the loft with rockwool and keep the roof as a 'cold roof' - we'll not be using it as a living space and it'll be used to storage only so he recommended that while you will save some money by insulating the roof as well it wouldn't be that much of a saving compared to the initial cost (roughly £1,200 for roof insulation alone).

    It's my first house so it's all new to me - learned more about building/DIY in the last couple of months than the last 20 years or so!
  • Nexus_6 10 Oct 2018 14:29:10 4,065 posts
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    @Rhaegyr

    Cool. Nice and sensible choice there - no issues in the cold roof other than it being roasting in the summer and freezing in the winter when you go up to collect something....!
  • ZuluHero 10 Oct 2018 15:04:26 6,797 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    I see the metal clamps for hanging the cupboard on are still there.
    One a similar note, I've just put 2 new wall hanging kitchen cupboards up in my kitchen, and was surprised that those metal wall hanging things are the only things holding it up.

    I've given mine a good tug and they seem to be fixed solid, but I don't entirely trust them...
  • Nexus_6 10 Oct 2018 16:19:51 4,065 posts
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    I was a bit surprised the first time I came to hang a cupboard and all it had was 2 clips but turns out they are nice and robust. My wall was old 50's plaster on brick and when I put the drill in the wall it just crumbled through the plaster and through the brick. Ended up a big long hole drilled with 5mm threaded rod resin-fixed in to the hole and then the clips hung on those.....:eek:

    My concern with Psycho's set up is having a nice robust clip screwfixed to some 12mm plasterboard sheet and nothing else. Hope I'm wrong though. It has been known.
  • fontgeeksogood 10 Oct 2018 16:26:17 3,670 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    I see the metal clamps for hanging the cupboard on are still there.
    I see the line of what i presume was silicone down the right where they didnt score it to break the seal.
    I see the insulation behind the plasterboard, and I see the cable pulled up tearing more plasterboard.
    I see the hole below the left hand clip.

    What I don't see in any of these areas is any pattressing or extra stud work to take the cupboard fixing, which suggests to me that the cupboards are only screwed on to a sheet of plasterboard...?

    If so - I wouldn't be storing any of those fancy porcelain mugs or nice heavy dishes in there. Paper plates and maybe some napkins only!
    If they used the right anchors - and why wouldn't they, they're not cowboy builders, right? - each one, even just fixed onto plasterboard can hold well over 100lbs.

    Plasterboard can hold a LOT more than people think
  • Nexus_6 10 Oct 2018 16:37:30 4,065 posts
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    Plasterboard can indeed hold more than people think.
    Generally, though, it shouldn't be made to. Not in a kitchen situation like this. There should be a layer of ply fitted to the stud behind the plasterboard finish to take fixings or run a dwang between the studs at the level of the fixings.
  • ionic 10 Oct 2018 18:54:57 740 posts
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    Quick question - we went to see a five year old town house the other day and one of the floor boards on the middle floor in the lounge seemed to be raised. It was under carpet so couldn't tell exactly. Would this be something to be concerned about?
  • Psychotext 11 Oct 2018 00:39:52 64,150 posts
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    Apparently they just hang on the brackets at the top, which are screwed into chipboard. Quality no?

    I have literally no fucking idea what the holes in the wall are about.

    Edited by Psychotext at 00:41:33 11-10-2018
  • Dougs 11 Oct 2018 07:10:05 87,357 posts
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    mrpon wrote:
    Wow! WOW! Hope they didn't drill through the wiring :rolleyes:

    For those sockets underneath.
    Wiring should come up from the floor for sockets... Although I wouldn't be surprised with anything with this lot
  • Psychotext 11 Oct 2018 09:47:40 64,150 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    My concern with Psycho's set up is having a nice robust clip screwfixed to some 12mm plasterboard sheet and nothing else. Hope I'm wrong though. It has been known.
    Chipboard is screwed to blockwork. As for the cabling, it's down from the ceiling. I know that for a fact.

    Unrelated, the estate I live in has its own facebook group and you know what... I quite like it. It's the closest to ever feeling like I've lived in a "community"

    Back on topic, we started the last but one stage of the complaints process yesterday. Believe it or not, this farce has been going on 8 months now. :(

    Edited by Psychotext at 09:48:46 11-10-2018
  • Nexus_6 11 Oct 2018 10:28:29 4,065 posts
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    That's good to know Psycho. Glad it's not another worry to have lumped on you.
  • Dougs 11 Oct 2018 10:30:26 87,357 posts
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    Psychotext wrote:


    Chipboard is screwed to blockwork. As for the cabling, it's down from the ceiling. I know that for a fact.

    For the sockets and switches? That makes no sense to me!
  • henro_ben 11 Oct 2018 10:38:34 2,371 posts
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    Dougs wrote:
    Psychotext wrote:


    Chipboard is screwed to blockwork. As for the cabling, it's down from the ceiling. I know that for a fact.

    For the sockets and switches? That makes no sense to me!
    It's a lot easier to run cabling across the ceiling void and then channel down the wall to a switch plate, especially if it's set up above a counter level, than to run it across a concrete floor, or all the way around the walls...
  • Dougs 11 Oct 2018 10:40:32 87,357 posts
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    I guess I'm thinking of older houses with joists etc for flooring rather than concrete!
  • Psychotext 11 Oct 2018 10:42:04 64,150 posts
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    I have no knowledge of such things, I just know for a fact that's how they do it in Barratt builds (possibly also David Wilson?).
  • RichDC 16 Oct 2018 11:14:29 7,984 posts
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    I think this thread will do. Not a house buying question, but related. Does anyone have experience with getting a lease extension?

    The lease on my flat is approaching the stage where it needs extending relatively soon (within the next year) before the costs start to get crazy. Various websites I've looked at manage to make it sound both relatively straightforward and incredibly complex at the same time, and the couple of solicitors I've contacted haven't been much help.

    Anyone got any knowledge/advice? Any recommendations for a good solicitors firm for this type of thing?
  • IJ 20 Oct 2018 23:31:32 958 posts
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    No experience on the lease extension. But itís a very common issue, especially in London. Maybe engage with a London solicitor, must be common for them to deal with it.

    I got a letter through from a no win no fee place about claiming stamp duty back. I did a bunch of research and contacted a few specialists, itís legit. Stamp duty is self assessment, so Iíll be getting over 10k stamp duty back. The government then have 9 months to challenge the claim if they think its inaccurate, past that point youíre clear.

    Mine is to do with multiple dwellings. Previous owners extended to the side and thereís an external door into the side of the house. That is accessible from the road (through a side gate) and leads to a utility room, bathroom and study. But as the law is very undefined, that can count as a potential separate dwelling. The study is the bedroom, the utility room could have a kitchen in it. The fact it doesnít and hasnít been used as a separate dwelling doesnít matter.

    Obviously itís stretching the law, but itís never been challenged in court so there are no precedents. Theyíre likely to close the Ďloop holeí in a future budget. Apparently theyíre getting 600 claims a month, so youíre unlikely to even be checked, and as long as you go through a legit firm and are honest, itís genuine risk free.

    Needs to be within 13months of buying the property. But if you have a section of your property with a separate front door and it could genuinely be used as a separate dwelling, you should get on to it. My check is that an au pair could genuinely live in the extension and be self contained. But itís never crossed my mind before this letter.

    Worth checking out!

    Edited by IJ at 00:12:32 21-10-2018

    Edited by IJ at 00:13:06 21-10-2018
  • GuybrushFreepwood 21 Oct 2018 02:46:38 382 posts
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    @IJ let me get this right? Are you saying that as you have an area of your house that could be classed as a granny flat, you're entitled to the stamp duty you paid when buying your house back?

    If that's the case, could you pm me the details of that firm you used as I've got an extension which the local council have registered as 'the granny flat' from a voting perspective. Previous occupants had their mother live in that area. There's an external door to a hallway which connects both areas of the house together.

    Obviously that area also has a bathroom and bedroom and lounge area.
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