Advice on house hunting Page 243

  • GuybrushFreepwood 19 Mar 2019 11:58:16 1,259 posts
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    @Psychotext I assume they're going to give you compensation along with eventually fixing all this shit?

    I'm never buying a new house. At least with mine I know it's stood for 50 years or so and although some doors might not fit perfectly and some things may creak, I know the core house is okay.
  • Psychotext 19 Mar 2019 12:15:46 65,469 posts
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    Probably not. Have spoken to two solicitors about it and there's basically fucking nothing you can do.

    You can get expenses covered but basically nothing else.

    My best bet would be threatening them with the papers etc. But to be honest I just want fucking done with all of this and to get on with my life.
  • Technoishmatt 19 Mar 2019 12:32:57 3,508 posts
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    What utter incompetence. They had the absolute Z team in building your place. Really sorry, man!

    Would put me off new build too, unless it was a grand designs type of build it myself, which would be amazing. Tbh I just want Kevin McCloud to come and criticise all my design decisions, in his dulcet tones.

    On the personal side, just had a meeting with my bank manager, and they seem fairly happy to give me a good sized mortgage, which means I am now in serious house viewing / buying mode.

    One thing I am not sure about, how much should I aim to keep aside for unplanned breakage/ repairs? I presume best not to plunk all my cash into the deposit but to keep some left over. Is it a cash sum or maybe % of house value?

    Also, wtf stamp duty :(
  • GuybrushFreepwood 19 Mar 2019 14:17:41 1,259 posts
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    @Technoishmatt I think it will depend on the house as to how much you need to leave to one side. There is no hard and fast rule.

    You need to consider removals and decorations (paint, carpets, curtains etc) and on top of that any big ticket items that might be on their last legs like the boiler / roofing / fencing. I kept £25k to one side. That was for a new boiler (old one was 25 years old), new fencing, shed, gutting the bathrooms. It also includes some "what if I lose my job and have a large mortgage" money to enable me to get another job.

    If the amount you leave over is too much, you can usually pay off a lump sum of any mortgage each year (usually up to 10%).
  • Technoishmatt 19 Mar 2019 15:20:28 3,508 posts
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    @GuybrushFreepwood ok cool, I am budgeting separately already for decoration etc and also a potential side return extension, so I think I need less than I first thought as a reserve.
  • Technoishmatt 19 Mar 2019 15:23:59 3,508 posts
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    It's just that the house prices in London are so high that keeping a percentage of the value quickly turns into a lot of money, whereas I don't actually think that the repair costs scale as linearly compared. Eg fixing a boiler in a 3 bed house in London isn't several times the cost of doing it elsewhere, whereas the house can cost that much more.
  • Dougs 19 Mar 2019 16:42:14 90,183 posts
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    @Psychotext that's ridiculous. No compensation whatsoever? Set of cunts.
  • elstoof 19 Mar 2019 21:04:00 23,911 posts
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    Technoishmatt wrote:
    Eg fixing a boiler in a 3 bed house in London isn't several times the cost of doing it elsewhere, whereas the house can cost that much more.
    Ho ho ho, someone isnít familiar with builders/tradesmen chucking on the London Tax
  • mrpon 3 Apr 2019 17:31:02 35,379 posts
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    Offer accepted! Going down the whole gutting, extension route.

    /bubbles
  • Technoishmatt 3 Apr 2019 18:43:20 3,508 posts
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    Congrats!

    In before a hard ERG Brexit lops off 30% of the value :)
  • GuybrushFreepwood 3 Apr 2019 18:57:00 1,259 posts
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    Congrats. Sounds like a hell of a project. Psychotext can give you tips on gutting a house completely ;)
  • Tomo 7 Apr 2019 09:44:19 16,701 posts
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    Who could this be?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47826166
  • consignia 28 Apr 2019 21:47:48 1,481 posts
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    So this question has probably asked a few times in this thread, but it's quite difficult to dig through this thread and I don't know if I've got particular circumstances.

    I've just had an offer accepted on my first house purchase (yes finally after all the years ago since I last posted in this thread) . So I'm going through all stuff that needs getting done, solictors and mortgage and the like. One thing I'm not sure on is whether to get a survey done, and if so what type.

    The house is in pretty good nick as far as I can tell and no big extension work has been done for it. Early 20th Century semi. My colleague who has done a lot of house flipping says I should go for a full building survey. Others have said not to bother, including people in the area with similar houses. I've vaguely tempted by the home buyers report, but again I don't really know what look at, since it's all so new to me.

    So are they worth going for? Thanks in advance for any advice.
  • nickthegun 28 Apr 2019 21:56:26 78,482 posts
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    If nothing else, it gives you an idea of what to budget for repairs and whatnot. When we moved it picked up some repointing work and the soffits and facias needed some love.

    We got a few finger in the air quotes and tried to get it off the price but the geezer said he'd do it himself.
  • Psychotext 28 Apr 2019 22:06:31 65,469 posts
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    Tomo wrote:
    Who could this be?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47826166
    I'm still not quite at the papers stage, but I'm getting there.

    On a similar note... https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/residents-fury-new-build-homes-14628009

    That's exactly the same render I have, so fucking odds on that happens here too.

    Edited by Psychotext at 22:07:06 28-04-2019
  • IJ 28 Apr 2019 22:12:57 986 posts
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    @consignia

    Unless itís a pretty recent new build, you should get a proper survey. 100%. Youíre mad if you donít. There are often 3 choices, at least get the middle one, normally around £1k.

    My sister just ignored my advice on this, within 6 months of moving in they discovered damp in the kids room. Ended up costing £20k to fix and they had to extend the mortgage are in a tough spot now.

    I got one on my house, came back with £5k if works and I got that taken off my purchase price. Reality was most was Ďoptionalí but I used it as a negotiating tool and used the money for a new boiler.
  • GuybrushFreepwood 28 Apr 2019 22:15:22 1,259 posts
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    When I bought my last house I got the bare minimum. That was what my agent said to get. Iíve sometimes thought that a larger survey might have given me some confidence when I find things about the house that Iím not sure about.

    Trouble with the surveys though are that they are written in such a way that they are unlikely to be liable for anything and they canít notice more than a person looking around can. But that said, they know what theyíre looking for.

    So, although Iíve had the cheapest survey and although there is probably nothing serious wrong with my house. When I see a crack in the plaster or a door sticks, I kind of wish Iíd got the expensive one.
  • elstoof 28 Apr 2019 22:19:25 23,911 posts
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    Donít bother with the middle level survey, either get the basic one essential for your mortgage or go full bananas
  • IJ 28 Apr 2019 22:28:03 986 posts
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    elstoof wrote:
    Donít bother with the middle level survey, either get the basic one essential for your mortgage or go full bananas
    I dunno, fine to say that but they can be nearly 2k and thatís a lot for a lot of people to find when moving. I think itís about risk, the property and how fucked youíd be if you needed to find 10k.

    If itís an old 200yo cottage or a house with N old mouldy dodgy looking roof, yeah go full bananas. If itís a well kept house clearly recently renovated then itís probably not needed.

    Ultimately, they rarely accept liability for anything and wonít cover anything they canít see. So it could have terrible subsidence, but if the owners have been clever and covered it up, they still wouldnít find it. Or if beams were rotting internally, theyíd never find it.
  • IJ 28 Apr 2019 22:33:00 986 posts
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    I think itís like getting the RAC to check over a car youíre about to buy. Doesnít mean it wonít blow up next week, but it can spot obvious issues you may miss and gives you confidence youíve checked what you can realistically check.
  • consignia 28 Apr 2019 22:44:07 1,481 posts
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    So home buyers report not really worth it then? That was the one that seemed to be the one that some buying advice web sites suggested.

    I do feel it it is pretty foolish to go for just the basic survey that is included within the mortgage. I guess at the very least I need to look into local surveyors to see prices and stuff.
  • Dougs 29 Apr 2019 06:59:24 90,183 posts
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    elstoof wrote:
    Donít bother with the middle level survey, either get the basic one essential for your mortgage or go full bananas
    Yeah, this imo. The home buyers is just one big massive arse covering exercise. So many caveats, and is full of ifs and maybes. The whole industry feels like it's a big con.

    I only bothered with the basic both times I bought, both period properties. First time it identified some damp which got sorted, 2nd time the only thing I've noticed is a lack of ventilation in the loft, leading to condensation and a bit of white spot mould on the rafters. Solved with a dehumidifier upstairs. Nothing major really, dread to think what the home buyers would have suggested as a solution.
  • henro_ben 29 Apr 2019 08:37:52 2,390 posts
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    Dougs wrote:

    I only bothered with the basic both times I bought, both period properties. First time it identified some damp which got sorted, 2nd time the only thing I've noticed is a lack of ventilation in the loft, leading to condensation and a bit of white spot mould on the rafters. Solved with a dehumidifier upstairs. Nothing major really, dread to think what the home buyers would have suggested as a solution.
    Have you checked the insulation along the eaves in the loft? Suspect it might be blocking the ventilation if you're getting condensation up there. Either than or you're getting a little bit of rain coming in - e.g. the flashing around the chimney etc.

    For survey's I've always gone for a full structural for older properties - there's much more chance of a previous owner having done something stupid... especially with the trend for knocking through between rooms and removing chimney breasts etc. The survey's aren't perfect, but at least they have a better chance of spotting an issue than me!
  • General_Martok 29 Apr 2019 10:46:01 823 posts
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    Dougs wrote:
    elstoof wrote:
    Donít bother with the middle level survey, either get the basic one essential for your mortgage or go full bananas
    Yeah, this imo. The home buyers is just one big massive arse covering exercise. So many caveats, and is full of ifs and maybes. The whole industry feels like it's a big con.

    I only bothered with the basic both times I bought, both period properties. First time it identified some damp which got sorted, 2nd time the only thing I've noticed is a lack of ventilation in the loft, leading to condensation and a bit of white spot mould on the rafters. Solved with a dehumidifier upstairs. Nothing major really, dread to think what the home buyers would have suggested as a solution.
    This. If you read the actual report the surveyor is covering his arse in every single sentence. So he basically write bullshit and get away with it.
  • Dougs 29 Apr 2019 10:51:10 90,183 posts
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    Yeah, that was the case but even with that removed, I still get a bit of condensation if it's really cold in the winter. I know I need to fix it properly though, most likely with ventilation tiles etc. The eaves being open isn't quite enough it seems.

    @henro

    Edited by Dougs at 10:51:41 29-04-2019
  • Graxlar_v3 29 Apr 2019 10:55:50 7,617 posts
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    We put our flat up for sale over the weekend :(
  • henro_ben 29 Apr 2019 11:09:08 2,390 posts
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    Dougs wrote:
    Yeah, that was the case but even with that removed, I still get a bit of condensation if it's really cold in the winter. I know I need to fix it properly though, most likely with ventilation tiles etc. The eaves being open isn't quite enough it seems.

    @henro
    Is your loft hatch insulated? If it's just a normal hatch then it'll be letting a nice steady stream of warm moist air into your loft in the winter...
  • Dougs 29 Apr 2019 11:22:23 90,183 posts
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    That's a good point. I also think the insulation is patchy across the floor so need to sort that out at some point too.
  • ionic 29 Apr 2019 15:40:22 744 posts
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    I'm about to move and got the home buyers survey. We got it at a discount through the mortgage provider. Was about £350. It does have a lot of caveats but you can appreciate why, they aren't going to put their neck on the line for a small cost survey. It does give you peace of mind and an idea what needs to be done

    If it's an old property get a full structural survey. Mine is ten years old so home buyers was fine. I'd be worrying about stuff going wrong if I got valuation only.

    This time next week my opinion might change though!
  • SnackPlissken 29 Apr 2019 15:45:25 1,134 posts
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    I don't know about peace of mind. They just cover their arses by saying it MIGHT have damp.. it MIGHT be asbestos... load of bollocks to be honest. If you notice damp, and it's pretty obvious if you do, then get them to do a check, or do it yourself.
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