Following Advice on house hunting Page 274

  • Technoishmatt 29 Mar 2021 18:47:29 5,135 posts
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    Just some local surveyor, no way will they travel! I think I might have a discount when business was slow, in 2019?

    £250 seems very good value. Our timber & damp survey was £275.
  • muddyyfunster 29 Mar 2021 22:38:41 1,069 posts
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    I paid £620 for a full survey in Hampshire. Also observed our buyer's homebuyers survey get done and I was quite shocked at how rushed and superficial it seemed. Admittedly this was only a one-bed flat but still you'd expect them to be thorough.

    I'll always go for the full surveys after seeing that.
  • ZuluHero 29 Mar 2021 22:52:33 10,145 posts
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    Surprised by that, my home buyers had loads of photos showing the problems, climbed up on roofs, into attics, etc. Photos of repointjng needed, cracks in walls, damp, all problems.

    I've bought quite a few places in my time, in fact this will be my fifth house buy, and each time I've pulled out of quite a few properties because of issues shown up in the report. I think that's why I'm a keen advocate for them.

    My brother had his, and he sent me it to read, it had the same level of thoroughness, photos as well, usually about 40-odd pages covering a wealth of issues.

    I'd be interested in seeing a report by someone who just has a quick nose around and leaves, because, in my experience, it doesn't seem like the right amount of work to give such a detailed report.
  • ZuluHero 29 Mar 2021 22:54:04 10,145 posts
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    Oh, a flat would be a bit more limited I guess, I'm talking about 3/4 bedroom houses.
  • Goban 30 Mar 2021 08:28:09 10,120 posts
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    Technoishmatt wrote:
    Wait is this a Scottish thing where it is already done?
    The Scottish system does simplify things greatly. I didn't realise it was different south of the border.
  • Nexus_6 30 Mar 2021 09:38:04 6,002 posts
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    Yeah, the SCottish system requires the seller to get a Home Buyers Report commissioned that then anyone that is attempting to buy can have access to.
    It's still a bollocks report though. And you can still commission your own and the more in-depth one if you wish.
    We got caught out on our house where the report didn't pick up a load of things including some serious damp issues.
  • SamNunn92 30 Mar 2021 10:05:38 935 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    We got caught out on our house where the report didn't pick up a load of things including some serious damp issues.
    Did you not have any recourse with the surveyor? I was under the impression that if they miss something that ends up being a problem (within reason), they have to pay to sort it.
  • imamazed 30 Mar 2021 10:08:15 6,635 posts
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    SamNunn92 wrote:
    Nexus_6 wrote:
    We got caught out on our house where the report didn't pick up a load of things including some serious damp issues.
    Did you not have any recourse with the surveyor? I was under the impression that if they miss something that ends up being a problem (within reason), they have to pay to sort it.
    All sorts of caveats on a home buyer survey. We did exactly that on our house, and they came and looked again and then gave us a list of excuses and limitations as to why they couldn't have foreseen the issues. In the end, it wasn't worth our while chasing it up further.
  • Nexus_6 30 Mar 2021 11:09:42 6,002 posts
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    Yeah pretty much what imamazed says. Also, issues didn't manifest themselves until a year after we moved in, we knew we were doing work to the place anyway that would take the problem away more or less.
    Buyer beware.
  • SamNunn92 30 Mar 2021 11:21:11 935 posts
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    That's quite shit really isn't it. How old were both your houses, out of interest?
  • imamazed 30 Mar 2021 11:25:25 6,635 posts
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    Oh, really old. 1860s I think. I took some advice at the time from family and friends to stick with basic Home Buyers, but I regret that now. This was my first house buy so, you learn. Luckily, in our case, the issues in question wouldn't have discouraged us from buying anyway, but knowing about them may have emboldened us to drop the offer slightly and save a bit of money on the renovations.

    Edited by imamazed at 11:25:51 30-03-2021
  • Psiloc 30 Mar 2021 11:47:54 6,165 posts
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    I think it's documented in this thread but our first house was damp as hell, like the walls were literally wet in places. Cost thousands to put right.

    Suffice to say I don't think much of Home Buyer's surveys. That being said we made a killing renovating that house
  • mrpon 30 Mar 2021 12:02:36 37,164 posts
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    I'm at work and one of my chimneys has been removed today \o/ Fingers crossed it's the right one, well the left one. Well the one that isn't left is the one that needs to be removed. Right?

    It's the wrong one isn't it?
  • Nexus_6 30 Mar 2021 12:26:47 6,002 posts
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    Ours was built in 1953. Bought it off the family of the original owners after the owners died.
    So we got a bargain in so much as the same house directly across the road sold for 110K more soon after, but we have had to do more internal work...
  • Nexus_6 30 Mar 2021 12:36:20 6,002 posts
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    mrpon wrote:
    I'm at work and one of my chimneys has been removed today \o/ Fingers crossed it's the right one, well the left one. Well the one that isn't left is the one that needs to be removed. Right?

    It's the wrong one isn't it?
    Why are you having it removed?
  • mrpon 30 Mar 2021 12:51:08 37,164 posts
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    Not required or used, there is another functioning one on the opposite side of the house.
  • Nexus_6 30 Mar 2021 13:11:49 6,002 posts
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    Is it just the bit above the roof then, or the whole breast too?
    And did you specify the left or the right looking 'at' the building or looking 'from' the building?!
  • Dirt3 30 Mar 2021 13:16:19 1,616 posts
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    If they smash the wrong one to pieces you can always ask them to put it back.
  • ZuluHero 30 Mar 2021 13:23:05 10,145 posts
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    Arguably, if you have damp issues that only happen a year after you move in then you need to look at how you live, as most of these issues are caused by that, especially in older houses. Victorian or older houses are prone to damp from condensation and poor ventilation, especially if they've been 'modernised' to help insulate them better.

    I had this with my current house, no signs of damp nor reported in survey, but after moving in started getting some. Brought in a damp specialist who confirmed and advised on how to fix the issues with small lifestyle changes and magically it all vanished.

    Secondly, the RICS approved website recommends getting a structural survey done if the house is in visibly poor condition, or if it's an older property, so if your house was built in the 19th century, then that should have been the main option.

    Like someone said earlier, buyer beware, ultimately its up to you to decide to what to do and assess the risks. I would never look at a property that would appear to need so much work that it would require me to see if it is structurally sound, so it's never really made sense to go for that level of Survey. Personally I've always found the level of detail in a Home Buyers to be very insightful and detailed.

    I would base my purchase decision on them, as they always point to the worst-case scenarios, and have done many times, much to the dismay of prospective sellers when I've pulled out of a sale because of one. My brother, which I mentioned earlier, had just had one done and has since pulled out of his sale due to the host of issues that were raised in his HB, many issues that you wouldn't have seen yourself when viewing the property.

    Edited by ZuluHero at 13:31:40 30-03-2021
  • Dougs 30 Mar 2021 13:38:25 99,066 posts
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    mrpon wrote:
    I'm at work and one of my chimneys has been removed today \o/ Fingers crossed it's the right one, well the left one. Well the one that isn't left is the one that needs to be removed. Right?

    It's the wrong one isn't it?
    I am trying to get builders round to quote again for exactly this. We had structural plans drawn up before first lockdown, including necessary supports to make an open plan kitchen/diner with bifolds. Had one kind of quote from someone who did work on next door (and is the dad of someone my wife works with) including making good in the bedrooms that the breast ran through etc.

    We also need a new boiler and to move the sink/washing machine and dishwasher to an outside wall with new drainage and have a decent quote for that. But he didn't.give an exact figure and has since been avoiding us so we're going to try someone else. Trouble is, the other quote we got back then was twice our budget for that bit of work.
  • Zerobob 30 Mar 2021 13:47:53 2,937 posts
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    I had a full Building Survey done on my victorian terrace before moving in, costing £460.

    As a first time buyer, I expected it to be a little more in-depth, and really only reported on issues that could be seen in situ, all of which I could have seen for myself... black mould on some of the windows, a piece missing from the stone steps into the cellar, rot on a joist end in the cellar, etc.

    I thought they might investigate damp levels with instruments, survey the roof, test the state of the electrics, plumbing, etc. but because the report is carried out by a solitary surveyor, they aren't qualified to do any intrusive investigation whatsoever.

    I think the whole thing's a racket personally, or at best money for old rope.
  • Nexus_6 30 Mar 2021 14:01:53 6,002 posts
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    ZuluHero wrote:
    Arguably, if you have damp issues that only happen a year after you move in then you need to look at how you live, as most of these issues are caused by that, especially in older houses. Victorian or older houses are prone to damp from condensation and poor ventilation, especially if they've been 'modernised' to help insulate them better.

    I had this with my current house, no signs of damp nor reported in survey, but after moving in started getting some. Brought in a damp specialist who confirmed and advised on how to fix the issues with small lifestyle changes and magically it all vanished.

    Secondly, the RICS approved website recommends getting a structural survey done if the house is in visibly poor condition, or if it's an older property, so if your house was built in the 19th century, then that should have been the main option.

    Like someone said earlier, buyer beware, ultimately its up to you to decide to what to do and assess the risks. I would never look at a property that would appear to need so much work that it would require me to see if it is structurally sound, so it's never really made sense to go for that level of Survey. Personally I've always found the level of detail in a Home Buyers to be very insightful and detailed.

    I would base my purchase decision on them, as they always point to the worst-case scenarios, and have done many times, much to the dismay of prospective sellers when I've pulled out of a sale because of one. My brother, which I mentioned earlier, had just had one done and has since pulled out of his sale due to the host of issues that were raised in his HB, many issues that you wouldn't have seen yourself when viewing the property.
    I agree generally. In my case, the seller had re-decorated the kitchen with really thick vinyl wallpaper. We moved in in the January and noticed a problem on Christmas day as there was a small mushroom growing up where the paper met the ceiling. Oh Fuck.
    I did a lot of investigation and in the end, got the cavity fill insulation removed. That solved the issue all over the problem wall. I reckon the seller knew about it and did the work to get it through the sale.
    Been bone dry since although the little beads still turn up everywhere when the wind blows!
  • ZuluHero 30 Mar 2021 14:25:09 10,145 posts
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    Zerobob wrote:
    I had a full Building Survey done on my victorian terrace before moving in, costing £460.

    As a first time buyer, I expected it to be a little more in-depth, and really only reported on issues that could be seen in situ, all of which I could have seen for myself... black mould on some of the windows, a piece missing from the stone steps into the cellar, rot on a joist end in the cellar, etc.

    I thought they might investigate damp levels with instruments, survey the roof, test the state of the electrics, plumbing, etc. but because the report is carried out by a solitary surveyor, they aren't qualified to do any intrusive investigation whatsoever.

    I think the whole thing's a racket personally, or at best money for old rope.
    That sounds like a home-buyers, as they won't move stuff to look into problem areas, though they should test the walls with a checker. You won't see the actual numbers, they'll just say something like; "High levels of damp in X place" and so on.

    EDIT; that also sounds very cheap for a full, as they should start at £600 but realistically will cost you around £1000

    Edited by ZuluHero at 14:26:31 30-03-2021
  • SnackPlissken 30 Mar 2021 14:27:59 3,180 posts
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    Viewed a few properties on Sunday. One we really liked but already had an offer on the table and is apparently in a good position.. probably no chain etc. Forgot how much a pain it is to buy a house.
  • ZuluHero 30 Mar 2021 14:30:39 10,145 posts
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    It's weirdly a sellers market at the moment, despite all the naysayers touting a property crash.

    I found competition so fierce I had to complete on my sale and go rental to put us in a better position for offering. And good luck offering under!

    Edited by ZuluHero at 14:31:06 30-03-2021
  • SnackPlissken 30 Mar 2021 14:39:44 3,180 posts
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    Yeah it is a sellers market. Estate agent said you need to prove all the monies etc which is weird to me because last two houses I just went.. Iíll offer x and yep got a mortgage in principle.
  • ZuluHero 30 Mar 2021 14:45:44 10,145 posts
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    Thanks to covid, we had to do that before they would let us do a viewing.
  • Goban 30 Mar 2021 18:38:21 10,120 posts
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    My potential new house, built in 1800 has damp and woodworm, nothing I can't handle...famous last words 😬
  • Dirt3 30 Mar 2021 18:50:29 1,616 posts
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    mrpon wrote:
    I'm at work and one of my chimneys has been removed today \o/ Fingers crossed it's the right one, well the left one. Well the one that isn't left is the one that needs to be removed. Right?

    It's the wrong one isn't it?
    Don't leave us in suspense.

    I'm betting they got the right one.
  • eleven63 30 Mar 2021 19:11:42 2,927 posts
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    Our neighbours house sold with in 5 days of going on the market. And they got more than the asking price.

    It is, indeed, a seller's market. Fill your boots :)
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