Does it matter what university you go to? Page 2

  • Deleted user 12 August 2019 14:40:35
    Wot nudistpete said.

    Though I do have respect for people with Open University degrees as I know how hard they are to fit in around a working life.
  • THFourteen 12 Aug 2019 14:42:07 53,174 posts
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    Depends what position and grade you are going for tbh. If youíre into those milkround post uni campus recruitment jobs then it is still important to have a decent 2.1 from a good university.

    Anything we hire for now we are after 3+ years work experience at least so we donít bother to look at uni at all.
  • Rogueywon Most Generous Forumite, 2016 12 Aug 2019 15:27:28 6,918 posts
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    Uni matters - with most employers at least - for getting your first job post graduation. Once you've been in the workforce for a couple of years, nobody cares where your degree was from, as your track record will be much more important.
  • nudistpete 12 Aug 2019 15:40:09 990 posts
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    Rogueywon wrote:
    Uni matters - with most employers at least - for getting your first job post graduation.
    It never did with us. It was a nice talking point in the interview, but generally if you walked in with a third from a third rate uni but showed you were passionate and could do something cool then I'd have welcomed you with open arms.

    Now we hire "experienced" people pretty much exclusively in India and I'd give my right arm for an enthused UK graduate instead, because they normally come in buzzing full of ideas and enthusiasm - they produce a nice symbiotic relationship with their team where they learn from each other.
  • Dirt3 12 Aug 2019 16:12:46 496 posts
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    yes and no.

    When I was a student some of the top companies would only bother trying to recruit from the top universities (russell group).

    Also, why would you want to go to a university with a poorer reputation if the cost is the same as going to one with a better reputation.

    If you go to one of the lower rank unis it is not an insurmountable barrier as people point out. But it is always going to be best to get the best degree from the best university you can in terms of career prospects.
  • Khanivor 12 Aug 2019 16:30:12 44,206 posts
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    Iíd imagine Oxbridge attracts and retains the very best teaching staff. So Iíd be surprised if the education isnít notably better than Slough Polytechnic
  • THFourteen 12 Aug 2019 18:21:31 53,174 posts
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    @Khanivor

    Not my experience of oxbridge. Dull and unimaginative lecturers who admittedly very smart, were terrible to listen to for more than five minutes. What minimal tutoring there was is left to PhD students with no teaching qualifications and the charisma of a minmaxed DND dwarf fighter.

    Ultimately you are mostly left to your own devices. They take the best a level students in the country and expect them to be good by themselves.

    To contrast a mate of mine who got worse Alevels than me went to Bristol and his experience of teaching is way better than what I had.
  • Khanivor 12 Aug 2019 18:28:20 44,206 posts
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    Furry muff
  • Armoured_Bear 12 Aug 2019 18:38:02 27,592 posts
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    Fucking hell, THFourteen is a posh cunt!!!!!!!
  • THFourteen 12 Aug 2019 18:55:40 53,174 posts
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    Innit geez.
  • mothercruncher 12 Aug 2019 20:51:06 16,775 posts
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    Anything but Oxbridge is just assistant to the director stuff.
  • thelzdking 12 Aug 2019 21:06:10 9,694 posts
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    thelzdking wrote:
    In terms of getting a job, yes.

    In terms of quality of education, though, it's far, far more complicated. For example a 'shit' university could still be good for a particular subject and vice versa.
    I stand by this statement.

    Also, purely anecdotal, but one of my colleagues has an MA from Oxford and a PhD from Cambridge (and obviously is far smarter than me). She said that as she approached the end of her PhD she was discussing what she wanted to do with her tutor. She told them that she actually enjoyed teaching more than the research, and her tutor told her in that case she should get a job at a new university because Cambridge isn't really interested in teaching.
  • CrispyXUKTurbo 12 Aug 2019 22:02:21 2,370 posts
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    Never met anyone whoís been to uni that has a mind blowing career, they generally end up working at rbs.
  • fontgeeksogood 12 Aug 2019 22:04:26 7,746 posts
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    Err, hello, the director is getting a report soon
  • Ienjoysquid 12 Aug 2019 22:08:24 346 posts
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    I went to a low ranked university, I also worked in H.E. for a long time recruiting for some poor universities and some good ones.

    It does matter which one you go to. If there's ever a time it's worth working hard it's during your A levels. If there is one thing I could change about my CV it's the place I got my undergrad from.

    For graduate fast track jobs you will have a much wider pool of employers to choose from if you have a degree from a red brick or Russell Group uni. Applications from graduates from ex-polys will simply go in the bin. For the same reason it can be hard to trade up to get into a masters course at a top tier uni if you've studied at an ex poly.

    It's very unfair, and it's hugely disadvantageous to precisely the kind of people HE is meant to give a leg up to. People who are the first in their family to go to uni, who need extra support, who had everything stacked against them in school so didn't excel in A levels, and who are the target of expensive advertising campaigns from low tier universities promising that a degree with them will open doors they simply don't.

    That said, graduate employment is a reason to choose a university, but it's not the only one. If it's a great course for you, you really love the place, and you are sure it's the best place for you to study that programme and thrive then go for it. Just do so with your eyes open.
  • CrispyXUKTurbo 12 Aug 2019 22:21:43 2,370 posts
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    CrispyXUKTurbo wrote:
    Never met anyone whoís been to uni that has a mind blowing career, they generally end up working at rbs.
    Although to be fair, sports science and things like that are a requirement. I work in it and the e-commerce sector and previously security - thatís all about experience, a bit of paper is no good for us.
  • THFourteen 12 Aug 2019 22:28:23 53,174 posts
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    fontgeeksogood wrote:
    Err, hello, the director is getting a report soon
    2!
  • nickthegun 12 Aug 2019 22:41:06 79,422 posts
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    CrispyXUKTurbo wrote:
    I work in it and the e-commerce sector and previously security - thatís all about experience, a bit of paper is no good for us.
    Mmmmnn.... it depends how high end you want to go. Fucking around on a helpdesk is all about experience but to do big boy stuff, you need a degree to get in and industry qualifications to stay in.

    I've got three yoofs on my team on a graduate scheme that will start, eventually, at quite a decent level. Absolutely no way that foot is getting in the door in the first place without a degree. The only people on our team who don't have one are ex-military.

    That said, for me anyway, it's less about where they got the degree as how much of a dumbass they are.
  • fontgeeksogood 12 Aug 2019 22:48:07 7,746 posts
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    THFourteen wrote:
    fontgeeksogood wrote:
    Err, hello, the director is getting a report soon
    2!
    Honkys?
  • MrFlay 12 Aug 2019 22:50:07 4,285 posts
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    thelzdking wrote:
    thelzdking wrote:
    In terms of getting a job, yes.

    In terms of quality of education, though, it's far, far more complicated. For example a 'shit' university could still be good for a particular subject and vice versa.
    I stand by this statement.

    Also, purely anecdotal, but one of my colleagues has an MA from Oxford and a PhD from Cambridge (and obviously is far smarter than me). She said that as she approached the end of her PhD she was discussing what she wanted to do with her tutor. She told them that she actually enjoyed teaching more than the research, and her tutor told her in that case she should get a job at a new university because Cambridge isn't really interested in teaching.

    An MA from Oxford or Cambridge is a bullshit degree where someone with a BA pays extra to be conferred with a completely meaningless title. It's an academic rank, not a postgraduate qualification. Anyone who uses the term is an incorrigible poseur. The correct term is MPhil.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Master_of_Arts_(Oxford,_Cambridge,_and_Dublin)

    I know this because I went to Trinity College Dublin which is modelled after Oxbridge. Same terms, same degrees and similar traditions.
  • Dougs 12 Aug 2019 22:58:19 91,262 posts
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    I went to a Poly which had upgraded to a uni the year before I joined. The standard of lecturing was a bit hit and miss to say the least (we had to point out that teaching sports science undergrads about photosynthesis was a bit wide of the mark) but it was still a great experience. The degree didn't count for shit but they do at least show a capacity for learning.

    To answer the op, it depends on what you want to do with it, but mostly not.
  • CrispyXUKTurbo 12 Aug 2019 23:04:49 2,370 posts
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    Itís all about the experience isnít it?
  • MrFlay 12 Aug 2019 23:44:23 4,285 posts
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    Yes. Students are fucking useless.
  • Armoured_Bear 13 Aug 2019 07:26:18 27,592 posts
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    Rogueywon wrote:
    Uni matters - with most employers at least - for getting your first job post graduation. Once you've been in the workforce for a couple of years, nobody cares where your degree was from, as your track record will be much more important.
    I work in I.T so very much this . I went to Napier in Edinburgh, previously a Poly and it hasnít made any difference to my career.
  • hedben2013 13 Aug 2019 07:55:53 1,270 posts
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    Rogueywon wrote:
    Uni matters - with most employers at least - for getting your first job post graduation. Once you've been in the workforce for a couple of years, nobody cares where your degree was from, as your track record will be much more important.
    I'm sure this is very true, when you want your first job to be specifically based on the content of your degree (ie. computer/tech based, per the OP). But if you end up doing a degree with no particular career path, like say, philosophy, your degree will be more of a sign that you can apply yourself to *something* and it probably matters less where it came from.

    After uni I walked into the very first call centre job I saw advertised, at a place that would never have had me on their grad program, and I'm still happily there years later. Not sure my degree made any difference at all, but as above, the years of experience are vital if I end up applying somewhere else.
  • Armoured_Bear 13 Aug 2019 08:07:27 27,592 posts
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    hedben2013 wrote:
    Rogueywon wrote:
    Uni matters - with most employers at least - for getting your first job post graduation. Once you've been in the workforce for a couple of years, nobody cares where your degree was from, as your track record will be much more important.
    I'm sure this is very true, when you want your first job to be specifically based on the content of your degree (ie. computer/tech based, per the OP). But if you end up doing a degree with no particular career path, like say, philosophy, your degree will be more of a sign that you can apply yourself to *something* and it probably matters less where it came from.

    After uni I walked into the very first call centre job I saw advertised, at a place that would never have had me on their grad program, and I'm still happily there years later. Not sure my degree made any difference at all, but as above, the years of experience are vital if I end up applying somewhere else.
    Are you still doing the call centre job?
  • Ienjoysquid 13 Aug 2019 11:17:18 346 posts
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    hedben2013 wrote:
    Rogueywon wrote:
    Uni matters - with most employers at least - for getting your first job post graduation. Once you've been in the workforce for a couple of years, nobody cares where your degree was from, as your track record will be much more important.
    I'm sure this is very true, when you want your first job to be specifically based on the content of your degree (ie. computer/tech based, per the OP). But if you end up doing a degree with no particular career path, like say, philosophy, your degree will be more of a sign that you can apply yourself to *something* and it probably matters less where it came from.

    After uni I walked into the very first call centre job I saw advertised, at a place that would never have had me on their grad program, and I'm still happily there years later. Not sure my degree made any difference at all, but as above, the years of experience are vital if I end up applying somewhere else.

    I would say it's the other way around. I think employers are more inclined to accept a degree from a lower tier university if it still means you can actually walk in and do the job (any kind of STEM subject for example).

    If you have a degree where it's not clear what you can actually do then where you got it from matters more.
  • hedben2013 13 Aug 2019 12:47:30 1,270 posts
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    Armoured_Bear wrote:
    hedben2013 wrote:
    Rogueywon wrote:
    Uni matters - with most employers at least - for getting your first job post graduation. Once you've been in the workforce for a couple of years, nobody cares where your degree was from, as your track record will be much more important.
    I'm sure this is very true, when you want your first job to be specifically based on the content of your degree (ie. computer/tech based, per the OP). But if you end up doing a degree with no particular career path, like say, philosophy, your degree will be more of a sign that you can apply yourself to *something* and it probably matters less where it came from.

    After uni I walked into the very first call centre job I saw advertised, at a place that would never have had me on their grad program, and I'm still happily there years later. Not sure my degree made any difference at all, but as above, the years of experience are vital if I end up applying somewhere else.
    Are you still doing the call centre job?
    Ha good point- no, I was headhunted by another department after 18 months because I wouldn't shut up about all the ways they could improve their processes, worked with them for 5 years, then moved onto my current dept. Had a couple of promotions in that time so I'm now a level above the level that graduates start at.

    Sure if I'd found a way in as a graduate I might be higher by now, but I managed just fine without relying on my middling and unrelated degree
  • hedben2013 13 Aug 2019 12:50:59 1,270 posts
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    @Ienjoysquid I have no idea if it was a local thing or bullshit I heard at recruitment agencies, but I was told some corporate employers liked philosophy because graduates tended to be good at "problem solving". But this was years ago so now, who knows
  • Sharz 13 Aug 2019 14:33:23 1,913 posts
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    When I was 18 I had no plan, due to family issues I drifted around and didn't do uni. Sure it meant random jobs here and there but eventually I got an entry level job as a lab assistant for a Tyre company. Over the next few years I learnt about standardising test methods and organic chemistry, so the company paid for me to go to the open university.

    The OU didn't actually increase my knowledge as rubber is pretty niche. But what it did do was give me a piece of paper that meant when I was looking for a job a few years later it made it easier. Anyway now 35 and no one cares about university, what they do care about is 10 years experience in the rubber industry and manufacturing. Now I am earning money that I wouldn't of dreamt of when I was 18.

    Long story short, university may give you a start but ultimately plays second fiddle to experience.

    Edited by Sharz at 14:36:55 13-08-2019
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