When DVD's change layer... Page 2

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  • Killerbee 18 Nov 2002 17:07:48 5,015 posts
    Seen 7 minutes ago
    Registered 19 years ago
    terminalterror wrote:
    and you end up paying EVERY time you watch anything, even taped films off TV
    Well, hopefully not, although I share your scepticism over the likelihood of consumers receiving any kind of benevolence from publishers etc.

    The main reason I buy DVDs and CDs is that my PC and DVD-ROM isn't in the living room, and I can't listen to MP3s in the car - where I do have a CD-player.

    But if I can download stuff, and seamlessly transfer it to wherever I want it (including my car), then I would happily do away with tangible media. As long as the copy is mine to play whenever I want to and at no extra cost to myself.

    The problem is that the music and movie publishing companies are too terrified of illegal copying and piracy. And I can't see Microsoft and Intel et al with their Palladium thing helping out here. I don't want to be inconvenienced when moving my music between PC, stereo and car if I'm a legitimate purchaser. Protect IP rights and stop piracy, yes, but don't impair legitimate users' rights to enjoy what they've paid for.
  • sam_spade 18 Nov 2002 17:10:21 15,745 posts
    Seen 14 hours ago
    Registered 19 years ago
    You could have a look at the DVD FAQ and/or get the DVD Demystified book which looks into every aspect of DVD technology, specifications and implementation.

    It also comes with a nice DVD showing some of the variances in encoding video, audio standards and tests so you can adjust your TV to the right settings for the perfect audio/visual experience.
  • ssuellid 18 Nov 2002 17:14:05 19,141 posts
    Seen 22 hours ago
    Registered 19 years ago
    Feersum Boundah wrote:
    Still, I'd like to know if there was anything in the DVD spec that made creating an implementation more difficult than it should be.

    I don't have access to them anymore so no links. But they were designed by comittee and like the ETSI specs very vague in places and open to interpretation. Unlike the ETSI specs they were not freely available.
  • Deleted user 18 November 2002 17:18:13
    ssuellid wrote:
    I don't have access to them anymore so no links. But they were designed by comittee and like the ETSI specs very vague in places and open to interpretation. Unlike the ETSI specs they were not freely available.

    Bummer. I think I came across some comment a while ago that said there was an inherent problem with the layer transfer. Something about the player not being informed when a switch over was due, or something like that.
  • ped 18 Nov 2002 23:49:37 11 posts
    Registered 18 years ago
    JabbaDaHut wrote:
    ssuellid wrote:
    DVD is the best that is available to the consumer at the moment. Of course its not perfect and it will be replaced in a few years and there is already a proposed sucessor.
    Which is?? I'm just starting to buy DVDs - Fuck!

    LoL :D
  • Khab 19 Nov 2002 19:46:54 6,583 posts
    Seen 9 hours ago
    Registered 19 years ago
    Whoa - look at that list of companies there... If all these really ARE backing this new standard, I figure there won't be much argument.

    http://www.ibluray.com/accueil.htm
  • Deleted user 19 November 2002 20:15:19
    terminalterror wrote:

    When was the last time you saw a big release on DVD that didn't have at least 2 discs? Even Amelie comes on 2 discs. Although partly because they are crammed with extras, a good thing, the fomat should have the capacity to fit it all in.

    Is it just me or does anyone else get the impression that this '2 disc special edition' stuff is no more than a marketing gimic?

    How many actually need 2 discs? How many have padding on just to fill up disc 1?

    How much does an extra DVD cost to produce? I'm guessing less than the extra fiver you pay for it...
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