The all things Natural HIstory thread Page 2

  • neilka 7 Oct 2014 15:47:54 22,536 posts
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    Sadly all of the dinosaurs' anuses rotted away millions of years ago, much like mowgli's.
  • MrFlay 7 Oct 2014 16:08:52 3,897 posts
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    neems wrote:
    @MrFlay

    I still maintain that Planet Earth is the best thing you can get on Blu-Ray, but in all honesty I wouldn't call it a Natural History documentary as it has very little scientific or educational value. As a piece of eye candy though... simply jaw dropping.
    I completely agree. They are spectacular and some of the footage they've captured is remarkable. I much prefer the old Wildlife on One or Two where they have a 30 minute episode focused on one animal. They had some remarkable episodes like one about weasels and another about rats. Every one of Attenborough's "Life" series are remarkable starting with Life on Earth and ending with Life in Cold Blood. He's covered every group of animals except for fish which present some insurmountable difficulties for his style of presentation and someone of his age.

    Edited by MrFlay at 16:09:39 07-10-2014
  • mal 7 Oct 2014 18:59:57 29,326 posts
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    Great-Googly-Moogly wrote:
    So let's get started huh. This aired last night http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/p026glmp/wonders-of-the-monsoon-1-waiting-for-the-rains

    Anyone catch it? Contains running lizards, bats playing chicken with crocodiles and attempted ass raping. 'Twas enjoyable.
    FWIW, it's being repeated tonight at 55 minutes past bedtime (Scotland and Northern Ireland excepted).
  • Immaterial 8 Oct 2014 15:11:53 2,311 posts
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    Two things I like- frogs and David Attenborough. Notice how the wrinkles transfer across species.
    wrinkles, liverspots and lumps on frog:


    Wrinkles, liverspots and lumps on Attenborough:


    That's natural history in action right there, folks.
  • Deleted user 8 October 2014 15:33:29
    David Attenborough sounded really posh when he was younger. I once read that he like to wear the same blue shirt and trousers in his different series so as to ensure continuity and not to intrude upon the on screen goings on. Remember the episode where he stood on a massive pile of bat guano, with loads of bugs squirming underfoot. "And even here, there is life..."
  • Deleted user 10 October 2014 07:18:36
    Been looking through my collection of natural history books and can recommend the following as good coffee table type books. They're big and heavy with lots of photos and illustrations. You won't learn lots about any particular topic but they're a good starting point:

    Animal (Dorling Kindersley)
    New Encyclopaedia of Mammals
    Rocks and Minerals (Dorling Kindersley)
    New Encyclopaedia of Birds
    Earth (DK again)

    DK publish loads of high level summary type books on all kinds of topics (science, philosophy, history). They are often called just The science book or the history book.
  • Deleted user 13 October 2014 19:26:11
    Interesting article about horshoe crabs:

    Evolution in the slow lane
  • Deleted user 16 October 2014 21:36:07
    BBC hub for all things natural history. Good for checking what's coming up on tv/radio:

    BBC Earth
  • JuanKerr 17 Oct 2014 08:39:06 37,710 posts
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    Good link.

    Ray Mears has got a new series on ITV ('Wilderness Walks with Ray Mears'). Really nice, gentle programme with lots of informative info. In terms of presenting, he's no Attenborough, but his knowledge is incredible.
  • Deleted user 17 October 2014 09:17:56
    Has anyone seen the giant frog in the Natural History museum on Cromwell Road?

    It's the size of a man.
  • JuanKerr 17 Oct 2014 09:21:16 37,710 posts
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    That your life on earth thing makes me depressed to be human. What a bunch of cunts we are.
  • JuanKerr 17 Oct 2014 09:26:59 37,710 posts
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    It's frightening.
  • JoelStinty 17 Oct 2014 10:15:44 7,865 posts
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    It is, it predicting oil and coal will run out in my lifetime (unless they find new unseen areas where they can mine I guess)
  • Deleted user 17 October 2014 10:39:54
    I thought that fracking, for good or ill, was supposed to cover our energy demands for the foreseeable future? And there's all kinds of new materials in development so no oil will probably not be a massive deal. I guess we're taking the easy approach of using what's there before seriously looking at and investing in future alternatives. I guess it's all about money and short termism.
  • JuanKerr 17 Oct 2014 10:46:31 37,710 posts
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    We're at a point where planning for the 'foreseeable future' isn't going to cut it.
  • MrFlay 17 Oct 2014 11:28:37 3,897 posts
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    There is no energy source that is comparable to oil, coal or gas. They are all highly energy dense, relatively cheap to extract and easy to store and transport. When we do run out of fossil fuels, we will have to adjust our lifestyles quite significantly. The Americans especially will be fucked with their utter reliance on cheap oil to enable them to transport their obese bodies to MacDonalds.
  • JoelStinty 17 Oct 2014 12:13:10 7,865 posts
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    Whatever happens we will probably leave it to the last minute. One day homework next day nuclear fusion. Human nature.
  • Deleted user 17 October 2014 12:16:09
    Or we may just 'decide' that we're happy to be the last generation of humans and leave it at that. Of course people will survive one way or another until we are inevitably wiped out by environmental change or some extinction level event.
  • JoelStinty 17 Oct 2014 12:19:13 7,865 posts
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    People of various ilk, to discuss whether it's time to change the period of time we live in : http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/anthropocene-we-might-be-about-to-move-from-the-holocene-to-a-new-epoch-9798854.html
  • JoelStinty 17 Oct 2014 12:19:32 7,865 posts
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    Post deleted
  • JoelStinty 17 Oct 2014 12:21:17 7,865 posts
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    zoolophage wrote:
    Or we may just 'decide' that we're happy to be the last generation of humans and leave it at that. Of course people will survive one way or another until we are inevitably wiped out by environmental change or some extinction level event.
    Saying that despite the cynicism, the science community is as vibrant and productive as ever. The solution will always be there , just wherever governments give them the money and time, and policies to implement them.

    Edited by Great-Googly-Moogly at 12:21:46 17-10-2014
  • MrFlay 17 Oct 2014 12:23:41 3,897 posts
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    I think we're doomed in the long-run. We are too stupid, selfish and absurdly, delusionally optimistic to solve any problems that require co-operation between a large number of disparate communities. There are far too many of us and no one is discussing how that is at the root of all of our problems. Crime, poverty, famine, war, climate-change etc. are all caused by or exacerbated by our population.

    Edited by MrFlay at 12:24:08 17-10-2014
  • Deleted user 17 October 2014 12:26:24
    I agree. What I cannot understand is why we continue to live in an unsustainable way and why, despite apparently being civilised, we haven't found a way to live together for the benefit of all humans. Well, apart from greed, self-interest, hatred/fear etc. Perhaps we are not so very far down the road to being civilised as we'd like to think. I would like to think that all humans (and other life forms) should be able to lead happy and prosperous lives. Na´ve, I know.
  • MrFlay 17 Oct 2014 12:29:23 3,897 posts
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    We are animals. We shouldn't expect so much of oversexed hairless apes with violent tendencies. I'd say chimps would do a similarly terrible job as masters of earth.
  • Deleted user 17 October 2014 12:33:34
    It is disappointing that, despite the wonder and grandeur of life, the immensity of the universe and all it contains, that it's difficult to appreciate being alive and the fact that things exist rather than there being nothing. The big picture is amazing, too bad that we distract ourselves from it with the petty mundanity of everyday 'life'.
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