Anyone else finding it hard to get into old(ish) sci-fi? Page 4

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  • McEwan 8 Dec 2015 11:56:51 884 posts
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    Alastair wrote:
    Has anyone mentioned John Wyndham? Love his work and surely it counts as old school sci-fi.
    Did he write "The Kraken Awakes"?
  • robo-ludwig 8 Dec 2015 12:33:35 23 posts
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    @FireFlow Blade Runner was based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, but even the events both share, which are few and far between, develop in a different way. I don't think 1984 is steampunk, why do you consider it so?
  • robo-ludwig 8 Dec 2015 12:58:51 23 posts
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    @FireFlow are you considering the years in which the book was written? If you are, point taken.
  • Alastair 8 Dec 2015 13:11:51 24,271 posts
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    McEwan wrote:
    Alastair wrote:
    Has anyone mentioned John Wyndham? Love his work and surely it counts as old school sci-fi.
    Did he write "The Kraken Awakes"?
    Yes, although I'll admit that I've only read that once and wasn't so keen on it.

    Chocky, The Chrysalids, Midwich Cuckoos and Day of the Triffids are my favourites.
  • Scimarad 8 Dec 2015 13:17:08 9,753 posts
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    @McEwan

    I kind of get that but I can't get past how unpleasant he is early on. I'm pretty sure I've read stuff with worse individuals than him and not been bothered by it so I'm not sure why this is different.
  • opalw00t 8 Dec 2015 13:39:44 12,830 posts
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    Wyndham is excellent - Chrysalids is my personal favourite.

    If youre looking for some really old sci-fi, Flatland is a classic from 1884 about a 2D world where status is defined by number of sides (quare is better than a triangle and so on). Women are lines...
  • bighairybear65 8 Dec 2015 14:14:08 333 posts
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    Greg Bear The Forge of God and it's sequel Anvil of Stars... Incredible books, cold and quite terrifying themes of War, revenge and planet killers.. Just brilliant!
  • MrFlay 8 Dec 2015 18:49:12 4,505 posts
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    Asimov, Bester, Clarke, Dick.

    Also Bradbury, Le Guin, Aldiss, Ballard, Heinlein, Keyes, Priest, Haldeman, Miller Jnr. Wolfe, Vance.

    Harlan Ellison's Dangerous Visions is a good collection sci-fi short stories from the seventies. Some the stories are pretty much unreadable though.
  • munki83 8 Dec 2015 21:18:46 1,853 posts
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    Does hyperion count as old sci-fi cos I've been reading that and the sequel and think it's superb
  • robo-ludwig 9 Dec 2015 20:57:39 23 posts
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    @FireFlow with that I mean how the world in general was in the years Orwell wrote the novel; how were the ideas back then, what were the hopes and fears, the general characteristics of both literature and sci fi stories, what did they think would happen in the future.
  • anephric 9 Dec 2015 22:35:37 4,185 posts
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    Orwell didn't particularly care about predicting anything in 1984 - it was written as a direct criticism of Stalinist Russia and the rise of fascism in Europe. It doesn't particularly try to be speculative. It was an indictment of the time in which it was written.
  • Alastair 10 Dec 2015 11:15:13 24,271 posts
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    FireFlow wrote:
    Maybe 1984 is more political fiction than science fiction?
    Yeah, I'm slightly surprised to see it mentioned here. I'd never have considered it sci-fi...
  • anephric 10 Dec 2015 11:28:53 4,185 posts
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    It's still speculative fiction, just more of a direct polemic against the contemporaneous world in which it was written.
  • JoeBlade 10 Dec 2015 17:26:34 5,089 posts
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    FireFlow wrote:
    Maybe 1984 is more political fiction than science fiction?
    It's sci-fi in the sense that it was set in the future at the time of writing. I'd be inclined to call it political fiction as well though.
  • frightlever 10 Dec 2015 19:20:42 1,492 posts
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    MrFlay wrote:
    Harlan Ellison's Dangerous Visions is a good collection sci-fi short stories from the seventies. Some the stories are pretty much unreadable though.
    I recently found my copy of "Again, Dangerous Visions", one of the sequels. Of course, the third collection was never published.

    It's funny thinking of the two published books as "old", considering they were emblematic of the "New Wave" of Science Fiction at the time.

    There are stories from those two collections that I read once over thirty years ago but that still stay with me, whereas I would probably struggle to tell you the plot of half the novels I read this year. Dementia could be a factor.

    I'm reading Jack Vance's Demon Princes pentalogy for the first time. They were written in the 60s, and it actually requires much more of a suspension of disbelief to read old SF than to read his old Fantasy stuff, like the Dying Earth.

    The invention of the mobile phone and the internet rendered 90% of SF plots ridiculous.

    I can still read them and enjoy them though, just like watching old TV shows. A story's still a story.
  • frightlever 10 Dec 2015 19:27:53 1,492 posts
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    Oh, if you like 1984, or Brave New World, seek out TJ Bass' "Half Past Human" or its sequel "The Godwhale". The sequel is the better book and you don't really need to be familiar with the first one to enjoy it.

    He only wrote two fiction books, and the first one was actually several short stories cobbled together. Hardly ever hear him mentioned but he's up there for dystopian futures.
  • Saul_Iscariot 10 Dec 2015 19:34:04 3,739 posts
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  • anephric 10 Dec 2015 22:50:11 4,185 posts
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    Philip Josť Farmer's 'Riders of the Purple Wage' from the first Dangerous Visions is one the best things I've ever read. It alludes to practically everything, ever.
  • YenRug 8 Feb 2016 12:06:33 4,553 posts
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    Whilst I've long enjoyed HG Wells' work, I hadn't known this about him!

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/what-to-read/the-scandalous-sex-life-of-hg-wells/
  • anephric 8 Feb 2016 13:50:58 4,185 posts
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    Robert Heinlein was the same. Free love, baby!
  • McEwan 8 Feb 2016 13:56:28 884 posts
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    Got "Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said" by PKD to read tonight... Interesting!
  • Deleted user 26 February 2016 14:10:55
    Forbidden Planet still holds up pretty well to this day, even if its pretty damn sexiest (by today's standards).

    The only other 'old' films I guess I would still watch are Invasion of The Body Snatchers, The Day the Earth Stood Still and War of the Worlds.
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