DIY Page 9

  • SamNunn92 5 Jan 2020 17:50:24 902 posts
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    Anyone know anything about tumble dryers? Just had our kitchen redone which has uncovered an (intentional) hole in the exterior wall, presumably used with a vented dryer at some point. We were thinking about getting a tumble dryer anyway and could probably reuse the vent if necessary. Is it better to go for a vented dryer since we already have the hole or stick with a condenser and fill the hole?
  • TheSaint 5 Jan 2020 17:53:00 19,486 posts
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    Vented are the cheapest but you can get much more efficient ones these days.

    Depends how often you’ll use it.

    Edited by TheSaint at 17:53:24 05-01-2020
  • gammonbanter 5 Jan 2020 18:09:14 1,872 posts
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    SamNunn92 wrote:
    Anyone know anything about tumble dryers? Just had our kitchen redone which has uncovered an (intentional) hole in the exterior wall, presumably used with a vented dryer at some point. We were thinking about getting a tumble dryer anyway and could probably reuse the vent if necessary. Is it better to go for a vented dryer since we already have the hole or stick with a condenser and fill the hole?
    Personally, I'd be worried about rats and other creatures climbing in there! Although I'm assuming the exterior hole has a guard in it.
  • elstoof 5 Jan 2020 18:28:30 25,589 posts
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    I’d keep the hole and use it for a new dryer, along with an extractor fan for the job if the logistics allow. I’ve a condenser tumble dryer and it still gives off a fair amount of heat and humidity
  • SamNunn92 5 Jan 2020 18:55:57 902 posts
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    Ta all - the hole does have a guard currently so no risk of creatures! Will have a look at the vented ones, mainly concerned about running costs tbh so if we can get a half decent energy rated vented one I think that should do the job.
  • fontgeeksogood 5 Jan 2020 19:04:21 9,523 posts
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    Put an oiled child's armband in the hole
  • Destria 6 Jan 2020 13:53:42 2,877 posts
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    I went vented, as I didn't need to worry about the location (new utility room on outside wall) and wanted the minimum of faff (no emptying of water tanks).

    Only downside is that a condensing one would warm the room up instead of chucking the heat out of the vent. But that might be an upside in summer, of course.
  • sport 6 Jan 2020 13:57:59 15,889 posts
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    Feel free to vent, mate.
  • Dirt3 6 Jan 2020 14:22:26 987 posts
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    Bear in mind that X files episode where someone had the genes of a snake and could crawl through small holes. They could remove the vent cover, turn into a snake and come in through the hole.

    To counter this, keep the dryer door shut at all times, then they would be trapped in the dryer unable to get into the room.
  • mrpon 6 Jan 2020 14:59:27 36,139 posts
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    You guys need to go MVHR!
  • SamNunn92 6 Jan 2020 15:32:28 902 posts
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    If I can't find a suitably sized childs armband and can overcome the X Files snake man issue, so do end up going for a vented dryer, how movable are they generally? Theres some pipework recessed to the side of where we'd install it which the plumber said a while back we need to maintain access to. Is it a case of just making sure theres enough slack in the vent pipe to allow us to pull the machine out?
  • fontgeeksogood 6 Jan 2020 15:39:57 9,523 posts
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    If you don't put an armband in there, how are you going to fuck it? A half melon would get cold and rotten quite quickly
  • elstoof 6 Jan 2020 15:50:25 25,589 posts
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    Just stick it through the hole and wait for a passer by to fuck it for you, obviously
  • elstoof 6 Jan 2020 15:52:19 25,589 posts
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    Tumble dryers aren’t very heavy, you’ll need slack on everything to be able to fit it, pulling one out is just doing that in reverse
  • Dirt3 6 Jan 2020 16:10:21 987 posts
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    Buy clothes made from polyester and then you don't need a dryer.

    Especially if your washing machine spins insanely quickly.

    I have about 5x Mountain warehouse fleeces for general wearing. They are cheap as chips, warm and come out practically dry from the wash.

    They do make you look a bit like an extra from Star Trek though and watch out for ESD.
  • elstoof 6 Jan 2020 21:20:54 25,589 posts
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    Sexy
  • Dirt3 13 Jan 2020 10:18:02 987 posts
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    Thought I might try to make a positive contribution for once.

    LED lighting, what a pain that is.

    Investigated because the house I have acquired has a shedload of recessed halogen bulbs and I want to replace them for high efficiency LED types.

    Turns out there are two types of halogen bulbs. One is a GU10, which is 220-240V. This is easy to deal with because you just buy a replacement bulb, although replacing the bulb without having the plasterboard crumble as you try to pull out the fitting is a pain. Why someone didn't invent some sort of protector is beyond me.

    The other is 12V and is known as a GU5.3. it took me a bit of time to figure this out, but these are in the bathroom and in IP fittings, so they are probably on the LV version for safety reasons. Now the problem with this is it runs off the 240V supply, but via a conversion transformer and the conversion transformer has a minimum load. So if you try to replace the 1x halogen bulb that is about 50W with an LED that is about 5W then it won't work properly. If you are to replace the halogen with an LED you also need to replace the transformer to handle the reduction in load, otherwise you may have problems with the bulb (flickering, shortened life etc).

    The minimum load of the transformer is stated in VA, which can be assumed to be power as a rough guide. So my transformers were 20VA minimum, which were fine for a single 50W (50 VA) bulb, but not for a 5W (5 VA) LED. So they will need replacing. Which I could not arsed to do, but will do in the future when the previous occupants stash of bulbs runs out.

    The end of my LED adventures. Hope this is useful to someone.
  • Frogofdoom 13 Jan 2020 10:27:20 16,269 posts
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    Just get the 240v sealed led units and take the transformers out. The transformers are a pain in the ass anyway.
  • Dirt3 13 Jan 2020 10:36:59 987 posts
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    I guess that is an option - didn't think about that.

    My guess is it would be safer in terms of fire risk and less prone to failure, but more expensive.

    I will investigate further when the bulb stash runs low. Ta.
  • Frogofdoom 13 Jan 2020 10:38:57 16,269 posts
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    Get ip65 rated ones, they are about 15 quid a light if I remember correctly.
  • Dirt3 13 Jan 2020 11:06:18 987 posts
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    I see you can actually get protectors for the ceiling plasterboard which is useful.

    Do you have any tips on actually getting the bulbs out without removing the fitting ? i have a tool with a sucker on the end that attaches to the bulb, but the bulb surface is not flat so it doesn't adhere. If I could get the bulb out without removing the fitting that would be great.
  • Frogofdoom 13 Jan 2020 11:09:39 16,269 posts
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    It all depends on the fitting to be honest, one of my old sets used the suckers but they never bloody worked properly. I replaced them with ones you could unscrew the inner section and the transformers blew up so I just got rid of them for led ones.

    Edited by Frogofdoom at 11:09:51 13-01-2020
  • Dougs 13 Jan 2020 11:10:34 93,664 posts
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    Those sucker things are a total pain in the arse. I used to have a couple of cheap 4 lamp ceiling fittings which used some GU fitting or another,which were a total pain to remove (especially as the bulbs kept blowing every other month). Ended up buying 2 new fittings, it was much easier.
  • breakablepants 13 Jan 2020 12:03:17 1,096 posts
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    Frogofdoom wrote:
    It all depends on the fitting to be honest, one of my old sets used the suckers but they never bloody worked properly. I replaced them with ones you could unscrew the inner section and the transformers blew up so I just got rid of them for led ones.
    This. The old spring-fitted halogens were a pain for pulling plaster away whenever you tried to get to the bulbs.
  • Deleted user 13 January 2020 13:05:22
    I replaced all mine in the last couple of months and went with the sealed IP65 units. They worked really well and produce a load of light. Got them from Screwfix.

    https://www.screwfix.com/p/robus-triumph-activate-sixsense-fixed-fire-rated-led-downlight-brushed-chrome-640lm-8w-240v/3471g

    Oh and warm white seems to look... warmest. And remember the beam angle and lumens.
  • askew 9 Feb 2020 14:58:51 21,339 posts
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    A shout-out to my homies, regency architects, who decreed that gutters should run through the roof space instead of out on the roof.

    Have an second-floor apartment in a regency property, and - not for the first time - the gutter has overflowed and is coming in through the kitchen ceiling. This time the wind has whipped it up enough to make it spill over. You'd think, when running inside, that it would be a pipe, but this is open -_-.

    I don't suppose anybody is familiar with a solution in these period properties? Pays me service fees so at least the damage to the plaster will be made good…
  • Goban 9 Feb 2020 15:02:20 10,071 posts
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    So the gutter actually runs inside? Or do you mean the downpipes?
  • askew 9 Feb 2020 15:06:20 21,339 posts
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    The gutter runs inside.

    Yep. Fucking dumb motherfuckers. Runs across the span of the building, and we're at the exit end.
  • Goban 9 Feb 2020 15:07:38 10,071 posts
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    I'm confused, how does the water get from the roof into the gutter? Or is it a parapet type affair?
  • askew 9 Feb 2020 15:13:42 21,339 posts
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    Sorry, yes, it's run off the roof, and I guess tucked behind some faux parapet is the exterior gutter, but rather than run a pipe down the front of the building, it's routed /through/ the building to the back.
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