Working from home - the new normal? Page 2

  • rice_sandwich 6 Sep 2020 18:43:54 6,534 posts
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    simpleexplodingmaybe wrote:
    Yeah the blurring between work/life is a hard one but weíre unspokenly expected to be available to email 24/7 already

    Iím trying to be strict with myself
    I log off at 4pm every day and don't give work another thought. I make a point of packing up the laptop even although I have a separate room where I can keep it set up all the time. Work and home life seperation is tough when your home is your office.
  • ZuluHero 6 Sep 2020 18:55:25 9,252 posts
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    smoothpete wrote:
    One of the issues for me has been that Iíve always had a very strong work / home separation, reinforced by a 45 minute walk each way. Now itís just my house, which is ok but Iíve struggled with any kind of separation.

    I set up a desk in the room that is usually our games / movies room, and after 9 hours working in there I just really donít want anything to do with it anymore so Iím not really playing many games.

    Iím aware this is a first world problem. Still though, itís disruptive
    Yeah same. I hate my man cave atm.

    I glanced in there earlier today and shut the door in disgust, knowing I'm going to be in there 9 hours tomorrow. I dread going in there now.
  • anephric 6 Sep 2020 19:06:56 4,412 posts
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    Unless I'm being paid to be on-call, I would be fucked if I'm expected to do anything out of hours. I've worked incident response before on-call and I will never do it again unless I'm getting at least double bubble for it. I said as much in my last review - funnily enough I didn't get a promotion I was going for.

    Fair enough, phone goes off as soon as it can, emails do not get checked out of hours.

    If this does become the new normal, there's going to be a massive cliff-edge of unemployment of everyone who depends on commuters: transport staff, cafes, commercial landlords losing huge amounts of rent. We haven't seen anything yet.
  • dfunked09 6 Sep 2020 19:12:05 517 posts
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    Yeah, finding it hard to disconnect at 5, especially with my team being thinly staffed at the moment so if anybody is off the backlog of work just piles up. Definitely miss the walk home from work to allow myself to switch off by the time I got in the door.

    Might have to start using my work laptop more instead of my personal machine to connect. Can just shut the lid and walk away, but if I have my personal machine on I find that I just sit there after disconnecting from work and just play something like Destiny straight away, which can't be healthy...
  • Pipedream 6 Sep 2020 19:12:55 562 posts
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    I'm working from home but not really doing anything. I work for a very creative company which thrives on personal contact so my work load is pretty much nonexistent. My home office space is a literal cupboard and spending more than an hour in there is making me go crazy.

    I miss my colleagues as we all get on so well and I dont really have any friends outside of work. Thank goodness for my wife otherwise I'd be so alone.

    If Xmas doesnt go well I cant see the company lasting 2021 especially as people have less money to buy luxury goods. Unemployment might be heading my way.
  • anephric 6 Sep 2020 19:15:38 4,412 posts
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    Luxury goods purchasing has seemingly remained stable and some things even increased, as people are spending money on that rather than swank holidays etc.
  • Dougs 6 Sep 2020 20:18:12 95,993 posts
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    ZuluHero wrote:
    smoothpete wrote:
    One of the issues for me has been that Iíve always had a very strong work / home separation, reinforced by a 45 minute walk each way. Now itís just my house, which is ok but Iíve struggled with any kind of separation.

    I set up a desk in the room that is usually our games / movies room, and after 9 hours working I'm there I just really donít want anything to do with it anymore so Iím not really playing many games.

    Iím aware this is a first world problem. Still though, itís disruptive
    Yeah same. I hate my man cave atm.

    I glanced in there earlier today and shut the door in disgust, knowing I'm going to be in there 9 hours tomorrow. I dread going in there now.
    One of the reasons I went off PC gaming too.

    I am usually quite good at work/home separation, kids forces that to an extent. I'm available if needed with my phone nearby but can generally ignore it unless there's major milestones etc.
  • Rum_Monkey 6 Sep 2020 20:21:56 1,455 posts
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    Is the new normal, now the new normal?
  • fontgeeksogood 6 Sep 2020 20:29:40 10,892 posts
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    The new abnormal is still Spartan
  • Rogueywon 6 Sep 2020 21:28:30 9,484 posts
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    Today's infection rate sure isn't going to do much to get people back into the offices...
  • gammonbanter 6 Sep 2020 22:36:31 2,030 posts
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    For us older lot, with families and stuff who have suffered years of commuting it's a (mostly) lovely change of pace that we want to hold on to.

    But can you imagine being in your 20s and facing a lifetime of working in your room with no after work drinks, making friends or office banter. Even lunchtime in the city can be fun.
  • Dougs 6 Sep 2020 22:40:16 95,993 posts
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    True that
  • nickthegun 6 Sep 2020 22:46:50 83,331 posts
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    I'm digging it to the point I'm actively turning down opportunities. I've usually got one eye on the next job but I'm super reluctant to rock the boat at the moment. I don't think our place will ever return to pre-covid 'normaility' and I'm absolutely fine with that.

    Most of my WFH gripes are more to do with other lockdown/covid issues, the job itself is perfect. I honestly would be fine doing this pretty much indefinitely.

    I do appreciate how lucky I am, though. If I could have picked a time in my life for the world to fall apart, its now. A lot of stars have aligned.
  • Rogueywon 6 Sep 2020 22:49:45 9,484 posts
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    gammonbanter wrote:
    But can you imagine being in your 20s and facing a lifetime of working in your room with no after work drinks, making friends or office banter. Even lunchtime in the city can be fun.
    Yes, this is true. One of the saddest bits of my trip to the office on Friday was walking past the little Italian place I've used for working lunches for years and seeing it had shut its doors for good. I'd had some good (and occasionally boozy) lunches there. And, shitty though it sounds, those lunches had absolutely been part of how I built up contacts and climbed up the career ladder.
  • fontgeeksogood 6 Sep 2020 22:49:59 10,892 posts
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    I fucking hate it, I'm a peacock, ya gotta let me fly
  • drhickman1983 6 Sep 2020 22:52:31 7,120 posts
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    I think my sentiment towards returning to work in the office changed the minute the government tried to push us back into going into the office.

    I think that there are downsides to working from home but as soon as that nudge happened I became very determined to not go back in, as I'm a contrary twat

    Edited by drhickman1983 at 23:06:38 06-09-2020
  • Rogueywon 6 Sep 2020 22:53:59 9,484 posts
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    The push to go back to offices looks lunatic right now, with what's happening to the infection rate. We know from the last few months that most white-collar jobs can be done just fine from home, but that schooling can't. Probably best to keep down the number of routes for transmission and, if schools are re-opening, keep people away from their offices?
  • fontgeeksogood 6 Sep 2020 22:55:43 10,892 posts
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    But your boys' property portfolios don't have any schools in, Roguey
  • nickthegun 6 Sep 2020 23:00:29 83,331 posts
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    fontgeeksogood wrote:
    I fucking hate it, I'm a peacock, ya gotta let me fly
    I'm the guy who sits with his headphones on for seven hours a day. The only thing that's really changed for me is not having to drive nearly 60 miles a day and my lunch is now a lot worse.
  • ZuluHero 6 Sep 2020 23:10:12 9,252 posts
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    I'm 23 miles (one way) from my office and I'm actually missing the drive, which was often through the cotswolds. I won't miss it in the winter, but during the summer it was often lovely.
  • Worlds 6 Sep 2020 23:15:34 37 posts
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    Absolutely love WFH. Iím in digital marketing and find that the time without distractions of office politics and chit chat allow me to be so much more creative and ideas-led.

    Getting way more done and feel healthier because I have more time And energy to exercise.

    Weíve decided to meet up at the office occasionally for a face to face meeting, but no more than once a week is needed.

    I do think over winter it might get harder though, with colder days, my place letís the heat out so quickly. Might pop into the office more over that period.
  • Deleted user 6 September 2020 23:29:05
    Im back in the office full time but dont have to be. There is only 5 back in out of 80 and im the only one that is there all week. I dont mind it, im happy to be back as my home environment is probably more stressful than most. I also live a stones throw away so its nothing of a commute.

    Moving forward it has been mentioned that for our team we may not do the usual flexi time (8-6) days anymore and basically just work what hours we want as long as projects get delivered. That suits me more, it means i can chill at home when the kids are at school if i want and basically have a lot more freedom.
  • rice_sandwich 7 Sep 2020 07:37:13 6,534 posts
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    Dominic Raab says wfh is damaging the economy. Surely the conservatives should be happy for the market to respond to its new conditions? Market forces are king and businesses that are out of fashion should repurpose themselves.

    It's not like the money saved from commuting etc. won't be spent. Expenditure will shift from train fares and cafes into other areas. Local economies could benefit although it will take a while for the market to adjust.

    The output of my team is about the same so there is no good business reason to return to office working even once COVID is no longer a threat.

    Edited by rice_sandwich at 07:58:22 07-09-2020
  • Load_2.0 7 Sep 2020 07:55:03 32,182 posts
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    Commuting was the worst part of my job and I've been lucky that my role always had a very flexible wfh policy. I have an ok set up with desk, office chair and monitor which really help's.

    That said 1 or 2 days in the office would be ideal for me, I need something to break up the routine of waking up land logging on/off at home, I miss the team interaction and novelty of interactions with colleagues outside the team.

    I'm not looking forward to winter. It's great now, being able to pop out for a walk, to the shops or for exercise or just to sit in a park. But waking up in the dark, cold and dark outside by 4pm, not leaving the house all day...

    That's a different story.
  • StixxUK 7 Sep 2020 08:07:58 8,403 posts
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    Something that strikes me about this situation is that people have very different, and polarised opinions about it.

    Some say it's the best thing ever and they hope they never have to go back to the office, others are miserable being cooped up.

    Likewise the other stakeholders - some companies are clearly happy about being able to downsize office space and save costs, and don't see any adverse effects from the WFH model whilst others (seemingly the majority right now) are very keen to get people back in.

    @rice_sandwich makes a very good point about the government position, whatever they do though I think it will eventually end up wherever it will be.

    Personally I'm a bit in the middle. It's nice being at home more but I miss being out and about (a lot). Went into London on Sunday to see an exhibition and dropped into a few pubs and shops, felt quite energised after being back out in the world beyond the immediate area around my town.
  • RGeefe 7 Sep 2020 08:17:20 1,371 posts
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    I work in education and normally classroom-based. I've been sort of out of work the past few months, getting a few dribs and drabs in as a job I went for got pulled at the last minute due to covid, so I was left in the middle.

    That said, I am actively looking for office-based jobs - even in schools - to avoid what will be hell in about a month's time. They can go on as much as they like that it doesn't affect kids but, on the low end, I'd be coming into contact with 100+ children a day. Telling me I can't pick it up from one of them?

    I'd much rather be secure and WFH than anything right now.
  • smoothpete 7 Sep 2020 09:21:25 37,203 posts
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    StixxUK wrote:
    Likewise the other stakeholders - some companies are clearly happy about being able to downsize office space and save costs, and don't see any adverse effects from the WFH model
    This seems to be us. The cost savings have been significant, and the detrimental effects negligible and probably intangible. We may even be doing better than before...

    We're also laying people off so if me working from home means less people get shitcanned then so be it

    The logistics of getting people in and out of a large office while maintaining social distancing under normal circumstances are mind boggling. And in a fire alarm situation, forget about it. Like, you literally couldn't do it.
  • Dougs 7 Sep 2020 09:25:43 95,993 posts
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    Yeah, I think that's a key point all large organisations are wrestling with
  • elstoof 7 Sep 2020 09:37:32 26,089 posts
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    fontgeeksogood wrote:
    I fucking hate it, I'm a Peacock
    First name is Drew
  • nickthegun 7 Sep 2020 09:40:56 83,331 posts
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    I think I mentioned it in the other thread but ive seen some of the feasibility studies and whatnot on the logistics of shifting people in and out of our building and in order to maintain social distancing guidelines, you would be adding about an hour onto peoples days to get them in and out and we arent even a particularly big building in the grand scheme of things. And, like pete says, that is completely disregarding any kind of fire safety regs.

    Its there in black and white. You can have offices maintain social distancing or you can have people back eating pret again. You cant have both, so pick one.

    And, yeah, capitalism. Our admin centres are just about our biggest expense. If we are saving money having people at home, it doesnt matter a jot what boris says.
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