recommend me a C++ book

  • tombo 21 Oct 2005 19:00:46 2,137 posts
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    Hey guys and girls. I'm looking to buy a book on C++ (the programming language). But they tend to be a bit pricey and there are hundreds around to choose from.

    Recommend me your course textbooks if they were any good.

    I've just finished a computer science masters, but we only learned C and Java. Now I'm appyling for jobs I find that many companies want C++.
    So I don't necessarily need a book on comp. sci techniques with basic stuff, but I need to know syntax. But it was a goodun tell me about it.

    Ta.
  • pac666 22 Oct 2005 17:58:31 221 posts
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    C++ for absolute idiots
  • tombo 22 Oct 2005 18:13:56 2,137 posts
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    pac666 wrote:
    C++ for absolute idiots

    I imagine you have that at home?

    Edited by tombo at 18:17:59 22-10-2005
  • Gunstars 22 Oct 2005 18:43:01 441 posts
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    The one I have is 'Programming and Problem Solving with C++ (4th Edition)' by Nell Dale/Chip Weems. Came with the latest Visual C++ .Net CDs etc.
    ISBN 0-7637-0798-8

    It's great for a novice like me it explains all the theory stuff really well, very clear. There are also great worked examples of code at the end of each chapter, the examples really help to make you understand the text from that particular chapter. After the the worked examples there is a little exercise to help you achieve the learning goals that are set out at the beginning of every chapter. You are after syntax, this book is the best seriously. Very clear discriptions about how to use, when to use and what it does for every thing!

    Really, it's helped me a great deal with learning C++. However it cost me 33 and that was from the uni bookshop!
  • ssuellid 22 Oct 2005 19:11:42 19,141 posts
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    Its worth ambling to a book shop and finding one that yu like the style of. Also probably worth looking for one thats for people who have already programmed in C - as quite a bit of the stuff mentioned in most C++ books is actually C.

    Avoid Stroustrups books.
  • tombo 22 Oct 2005 19:27:13 2,137 posts
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    Well, yeah, I have looked in some shops, but they only stock a small sample of the ones in existence. But yeah, I'll avoid Stroustrups.

    @ Gunstars - cheers, I'll look it up. But 33 is pricey!
  • lost-soul 22 Oct 2005 19:32:48 435 posts
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    Some free ones here.
  • matrim83 22 Oct 2005 20:28:01 5,712 posts
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    A nice idea is to search the torrents for c++ books (just try programming in the search option). Although Ebooks cannot be seriously used for studying but they are a good indicator if you want to buy their printed versions so you dont end up paying for something that doesnt suit your needs.

    /Feels dirty.
  • martyngates 22 Oct 2005 22:14:33 1,752 posts
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    i know everyone feels stupid reading them but the Sams 'teach yourself in 24hours' or '21 days' books i find are realy good for picking up all the basics and starting off new languages, and they can be picked up quite cheap on amazon
  • lagairt 22 Oct 2005 22:17:21 452 posts
    Registered 15 years ago
    I also recently finished my computer science degree - we touched C++ but it was mainly C# and Java that we used as well.

    This is a nice little site for syntax basics:

    http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/


    I wouldnt really suggest a book until you know what exactly you are going to be doing in C++ - e.g. database work, game design etc

    There are a range of other resources online that will get you up to speed. Personally speaking if you were any good at Java I dont think you will have much trouble mate.
  • The-Old-Bill 22 Oct 2005 22:23:52 5,101 posts
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    How about this?


    Make sure you read the comments.
  • Jonsend 23 Oct 2005 12:52:08 803 posts
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    I use 'C++ How To Program' by Deitel and Deitel. I couldn't tell you if it was better than the other though as it's the only one I've ever used. I've had no probs with it though.
  • Mr_Dave 23 Oct 2005 13:05:17 496 posts
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    Just out of curiosity, why avoid Stroustup's books? They may not be the world's most entertaining reads, but he certainly knows his onions, having developed the language.
  • ssuellid 23 Oct 2005 13:13:50 19,141 posts
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    Dr Dave wrote:
    Just out of curiosity, why avoid Stroustup's books? They may not be the world's most entertaining reads, but he certainly knows his onions, having developed the language.

    IMHO they are not well written, lost somewhere between a reference and an example book, usually poor examples, explains stuff without really giving an clue why you would want to in real world use etc.

    Not really suitable for beginners or experts and certainly not the definitive 1 book solution for C++. If you want 1 book then avoid Stroustrop.
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