Following Random rants that don't warrant their own threads Page 467

  • GuybrushFreepwood 18 Dec 2018 15:18:08 459 posts
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    Oh, though we have refused them phones (every other bugger in their classes has one) and we block social media.

    So I guess other kids must think we're Amish or something like that.
  • JamboWayOh 18 Dec 2018 15:19:00 10,723 posts
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    Some of the the kids I teach here have at least one after school activity, and they generally have an 8.30 to 5pm school day. I do feel sorry for them. Sometimes.
  • elstoof 18 Dec 2018 15:20:11 22,168 posts
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    There’ll likely be a backlash when this generation grows up, they’ll be so used to having all the time lavished on them the kids won’t get a look in. Then the cycle begins again when their kids refuse to be like their selfish parents
  • Fake_Blood 18 Dec 2018 15:31:30 9,159 posts
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    The thing I do notice is that they try a lot of different activities, which is good, but also give them up after 6 months/ a year, which might be bad? My niece is 11 and she's already tried and given up on horseback riding and piano lessons. The piano was rented, the horse riding gear was not. Now it's dancing that she's into.
  • You-can-call-me-kal 18 Dec 2018 15:35:38 13,360 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    Fake_Blood wrote:
    As a guy with no kids I do notice that parents seem a lot more involved in their kids's lives these days.
    In the 80s it was more like you didn't try to get in your parents way, and at 7pm dad wanted to watch the news so the nintendo went off, no discussions.
    These days it seems like kids have an activity planned for every day of the week, and the parents drive them there and back.

    /old man rant
    Agree - and it's no good. They need down time just like anyone else. My boy is well happy just running around the garden or playing on the stairs. Too much progrmmed activity time is expensive and no good for them imo
    There’s obviously a balance to be found. Learning a sport or instrument is a good thing. But they need to be able to entertain themselves as well.

    Both my boys have a sport and the older has an instrument as well. Beyond that we just muck about the house or go to the park. Seems to be decent balance.
  • THFourteen 18 Dec 2018 15:38:34 50,567 posts
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    Fake_Blood wrote:
    The thing I do notice is that they try a lot of different activities, which is good, but also give them up after 6 months/ a year, which might be bad? My niece is 11 and she's already tried and given up on horseback riding and piano lessons. The piano was rented, the horse riding gear was not. Now it's dancing that she's into.
    Is she actually "into" those things or is she pushed? My parents were ultra pushy sending me to all kinds of music and sports lessons for which i had no interest and no aptitude. It was all because they wanted to parade their kids in front of other parents "look at my son playing piano" type shit.
  • Nexus_6 18 Dec 2018 15:40:02 4,097 posts
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    There is a social aspect to all this too of course. Someone mentioned getting driven there and back to all their events - they will grow up thinking thats how we interact with cities or wherever they live, so end up not valuing public transport etc and its democratising effects.
    If they themselves cant afford a car in future they might not have the skills to get about and then lead a more insular life.
    Its the thin end of a wedge re-shaping our culture to dare i say it, a more american style. For the worse.
  • Dougs 18 Dec 2018 15:42:18 87,623 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    we are £42 a day at nursery whether they attend or not) each so thats 2 days of both and 1 day of one - £210/week or £11k a year roughly

    I work freelance more or less so just take a day or a half day when needed to look after or take one to the hospital or whatever.

    It seems like a lot of money when you add it up but we save a lot in other ways - like not having a life outside the home. Drinking cheap cans in the dark in just underwear. Looking out the window at the rain. Etc
    😂
  • Nexus_6 18 Dec 2018 15:44:00 4,097 posts
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    You-can-call-me-kal wrote:
    Nexus_6 wrote:
    Fake_Blood wrote:
    As a guy with no kids I do notice that parents seem a lot more involved in their kids's lives these days.
    In the 80s it was more like you didn't try to get in your parents way, and at 7pm dad wanted to watch the news so the nintendo went off, no discussions.
    These days it seems like kids have an activity planned for every day of the week, and the parents drive them there and back.

    /old man rant
    Agree - and it's no good. They need down time just like anyone else. My boy is well happy just running around the garden or playing on the stairs. Too much progrmmed activity time is expensive and no good for them imo
    There’s obviously a balance to be found. Learning a sport or instrument is a good thing. But they need to be able to entertain themselves as well.

    Both my boys have a sport and the older has an instrument as well. Beyond that we just muck about the house or go to the park. Seems to be decent balance.
    Balance absolutely necessary. Determining their own interests and how to spend their time is really important.
    Mine are a bit young to really have a class to go to yet but would want them to be doing gymnastics or football or some other structured skill activity.
    I want to be the one to do an activity with them though like model making or whatever.

    Just digging in the garden together this year was great fun and we got a lot out of it, then in for dinner and 27 hours of Paw Patrol before bed
  • You-can-call-me-kal 18 Dec 2018 15:44:01 13,360 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    There is a social aspect to all this too of course. Someone mentioned getting driven there and back to all their events - they will grow up thinking thats how we interact with cities or wherever they live, so end up not valuing public transport etc and its democratising effects.
    If they themselves cant afford a car in future they might not have the skills to get about and then lead a more insular life.
    Its the thin end of a wedge re-shaping our culture to dare i say it, a more american style. For the worse.
    I think you’re massively overstating here tbh. Kids getting driven everywhere is nothing new. If anything public transport gives you freedom to get away from your parents once you reach that age. And working out a bus timetable isn’t something you won’t be able to do.

    All a bit “in my days we played with rocks and soot and were happy about it”.
  • Dougs 18 Dec 2018 15:46:52 87,623 posts
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    Only thing I'm pushy about is swimming, because I think it's such a fundamental life skill (especially living on the coast). Eldest is pretty good and really is only carrying on to develop technique. If he wanted to ditch it, I wouldn't be bothered but he loves it. Youngest struggles a bit with it but is now much more confident in the water than a year ago, which is also important.
  • Nexus_6 18 Dec 2018 15:48:43 4,097 posts
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    Fair enough, but I really do see a cultural shift in how we spend our free time. Visits to soft play in out of town sheds, shopping for toys in out of town malls. Leisure pursuits in big arenas with car parks in front and no pavements, 8 miles from local centres.
    Extrapolating for effect above but this can and does change how we as a society see things like cities, towns, villages. Congregating in urban centres more and more.
  • elstoof 18 Dec 2018 15:48:56 22,168 posts
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    Worried about those rising sea levels eh Dougs
  • nickthegun 18 Dec 2018 15:49:51 76,175 posts
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    It does build up surprisingly quickly. My daughter had a bit of a meltdown a few years ago because we had gradually, almost without thinking, organised her an activity every night. School choir, brownies, guitar, swimming and then horse riding was, admittedly, quite a lot and she ended up quitting most of them as she was too tired to enjoy any of them.
  • nickthegun 18 Dec 2018 15:51:18 76,175 posts
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    And, yeah, swimming was the only one we insisted she kept on and she's now at the level where if she wanted to quit, I wouldn't be arsed.
  • Fake_Blood 18 Dec 2018 15:53:06 9,159 posts
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    I do remember being bored out of my skull for most of the 80s. We got to buy 2 nintendo games/year, which we bought with the money we saved up ourselves, and then we were "allowed" to spend it on a game.

    On the one hand you do get creative, a broom handle becomes a sword, the cover from a trash can becomes a shield. As stated above there should be some balance, do cool stuff with your kids, but they should definitely have some down time and be bored from time to time too.
  • Graxlar_v3 18 Dec 2018 15:53:07 4,756 posts
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    our kid is just under 2, but i think i have already ruined him.

    we have a zoo-lite 5 minutes from home and a decent sized farm about 15 minutes away. I bought annual passes earlier on in the year and have taken him to one or both pretty much every free weekend. He now loves animals & dinosaurs (there is a newish dinosaur thing at the zoo-lite) and his nursery say he is alot more inclined to do activities which include them.

    He is also way behind in his speaking (he talks alot, just it is babbling as opposed to actual words).
  • You-can-call-me-kal 18 Dec 2018 15:54:08 13,360 posts
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    Nexus_6 wrote:
    Fair enough, but I really do see a cultural shift in how we spend our free time. Visits to soft play in out of town sheds, shopping for toys in out of town malls. Leisure pursuits in big arenas with car parks in front and no pavements, 8 miles from local centres.
    Extrapolating for effect above but this can and does change how we as a society see things like cities, towns, villages. Congregating in urban centres more and more.
    Yeah there’s something in that. I think we’re in likelihood entering a new era now anyway driven by environmental change, different approaches to urban mobility, cities and town changing role due to transactional retail moving online etc. Better or worse who knows, but probably very different.
  • elstoof 18 Dec 2018 15:54:18 22,168 posts
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    Babbling at under 2 isn’t behind!
  • Fake_Blood 18 Dec 2018 15:56:02 9,159 posts
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    Don't kids learn to swim in school in the UK? Here in Belgium it's like a mandatory thing.
  • Jyzzy-Z 18 Dec 2018 15:57:06 3,725 posts
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    Fake_Blood wrote:
    Don't kids learn to swim in school in the UK? Here in Belgium it's like a mandatory thing.
    All of the pools have been seized by the military and filled with baked beans ready for no deal Brexit.
  • Fake_Blood 18 Dec 2018 15:57:32 9,159 posts
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    Okay glol :D
  • Graxlar_v3 18 Dec 2018 15:57:36 4,756 posts
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    he is 2 in a month and all the kids around him at school are able to string 1 or 2 words together, like bye daddy etc.

    We do get a ready, steady go alot and he says cat or daddy. Refuses point blank to say Mummy (which i secretly find very funny but my missus gets upset about).

    The nursery actually have him in a 'special' nurture group to help improve his speaking

    Edited by Graxlar_v3 at 15:59:57 18-12-2018
  • elstoof 18 Dec 2018 15:59:46 22,168 posts
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    My eldest equates shopping to looking for things online, apart from sweets and magazines. I don’t think I’ve ever taken her to a shopping centre, or even oxford street, to buy things. We’re lucky that we live in a community where there’s plenty of activities locally, ice rink 2 minutes away, heaps of parks and playgrounds, the soft play is 2 minutes drive. Much better than when I was a kid, we didn’t have a car and there was only one real park locally living in central London. I never went anywhere tbh, I spent most of my time indoors
  • elstoof 18 Dec 2018 16:02:16 22,168 posts
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    Graxlar_v3 wrote:
    he is 2 in a month and all the kids around him at school are able to string 1 or 2 words together, like bye daddy etc.

    They all progress in different areas at different speeds, I wouldn’t worry at all. Don’t think mine were stringing anything together at that age, but there was one girl in the class who could have a proper conversation. No coordination to speak of though, while other kids could put blocks in holes she’d be stumped. They all caught up with each other eventually
  • nickthegun 18 Dec 2018 16:03:56 76,175 posts
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    Fake_Blood wrote:
    Don't kids learn to swim in school in the UK? Here in Belgium it's like a mandatory thing.
    English schools give kids just enough free lessons to be embarrassed if they don't know how to swim but not enough to actually learn how to properly.
  • Graxlar_v3 18 Dec 2018 16:05:08 4,756 posts
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    @elstoof I also have this to worry about

    https://www.foundationyears.org.uk/files/2012/03/A-Know-How-Guide.pdf
  • Your-Mother 18 Dec 2018 16:05:11 2,295 posts
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    Where do my dogs and cats fit into this conversation
  • Dougs 18 Dec 2018 16:05:16 87,623 posts
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    Exactly.

    @nick and els

    Edited by Dougs at 16:05:49 18-12-2018
  • Fake_Blood 18 Dec 2018 16:12:37 9,159 posts
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    nickthegun wrote:
    Fake_Blood wrote:
    Don't kids learn to swim in school in the UK? Here in Belgium it's like a mandatory thing.
    English schools give kids just enough free lessons to be embarrassed if they don't know how to swim but not enough to actually learn how to properly.
    Well that sucks. Here most school alternate between sports/gymnastics one week, and swimming the next week. Most 12yo’s get a sort of swimming degree when they can swim 1000m without stopping, and some even get a sort of lifeguard thing where they have to get a dummy from the bottom of the pool, whilst wearing pyjamas (to simulate swimming whilst being dressed).

    I think were anticipating the rising sea levels or something.
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