Learning the Piano.. Page 2

  • jonsaan 20 Aug 2007 11:46:55 27,052 posts
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    Surely the are MS and Sony made pianos we can argue about?
  • TwistidChimp 20 Aug 2007 11:53:08 8,825 posts
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    Cheers for all the advice folks. I would, as has been suggested, look for a cheap local pickup of a real piano, but as woodnotes says, I didn't fancy having to have it professionaly retuned, also this is probably going to have to go into an upstairs room.. dont really fancy attempting to get a full weight piano up the stairs :)
  • [maven] 20 Aug 2007 11:57:56 5,761 posts
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    Tuning isn't that expensive though, is it? I had mine retuned for about 70-ish (and it had to be tuned a half-tone higher because the strings are so old the piano is from ~1890; not much of a problem as I don't have absolute hearing and only play solo).
  • jonsaan 20 Aug 2007 11:59:22 27,052 posts
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    [maven] wrote:
    Tuning isn't that expensive though, is it? I had mine retuned for about 70-ish (and it had to be tuned a half-tone higher because the strings are so old the piano is from ~1890; not much of a problem as I don't have absolute hearing and only play solo).

    Just avoid any pianos with broken or missing strings.
  • Deleted user 20 August 2007 12:05:47
    TwistidChimp wrote:
    Cheers for all the advice folks. I would, as has been suggested, look for a cheap local pickup of a real piano, but as woodnotes says, I didn't fancy having to have it professionaly retuned, also this is probably going to have to go into an upstairs room.. dont really fancy attempting to get a full weight piano up the stairs :)

    A real piano is nice, but very large, not as flexible and cumbersome. Also much more maintenenace involved including Tuning.

    I've been playing piano my whole life and I'm happy with my Roland. And I've played on some of the best Grands in the world, so there you go.

    Some old pianos can feel muffled, clunky, or sound dreadful. Just because it's a real piano doesn't mean it's any good.

    EDIT: Whatever you choose to do, don't feel embarassed to play a few notes. Or get the seller to play something to you. You want to hear some big chords, along with high notes and the bass notes. Make sure it all sounds really good. And as someone above said, take a look inside, check the condition of the strings, hammers, etc.
  • Phattso 20 Aug 2007 12:12:21 27,073 posts
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    Just to state the obvious, in case noone else has mentioned it so far, the benefit of a synth over a real piano is that one can play it wearing headphones should the mood take you at some ungodly hour of the day or night. ;-)

    /is a secret 2AM composer
  • wobbler147 20 Aug 2007 12:36:23 5,254 posts
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    Hammond ftw!

    /loves the charlatans
  • Deleted user 20 August 2007 12:43:09
    Phattso wrote:
    Just to state the obvious, in case noone else has mentioned it so far, the benefit of a synth over a real piano is that one can play it wearing headphones should the mood take you at some ungodly hour of the day or night. ;-)

    /is a secret 2AM composer

    Yep, I forgot about that much used benefit :)

    They can still hear your fingers hammering away though ;)
  • Deleted user 20 August 2007 12:43:30
    wobbler147 wrote:
    Hammond ftw!

    /loves the charlatans

    Is that what he did before Top Gear?
  • Phattso 20 Aug 2007 12:56:50 27,073 posts
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    woodnotes wrote:
    They can still hear your fingers hammering away though ;)

    Well indeed, although without the fully weighted key of an actual piano it's possible to depress a note without needing to put ones full body weight behind it to get a sound.


    I'm not being serious, before the Piano Mob lynches me. ;)
  • wobbler147 20 Aug 2007 13:05:02 5,254 posts
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    woodnotes wrote:
    wobbler147 wrote:
    Hammond ftw!

    /loves the charlatans

    Is that what he did before Top Gear?

    I'll get your coat.
  • Lukus 1 Dec 2007 15:37:03 24,375 posts
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    If you have the room and money, then even a cheap second hand honky tonk real piano is better than a keyboard of the same price. IMNSHO.

    Oops, didn't realise this was just a Blizeh 'should I do this, should I sit here, should I sit there' bump. :)
  • Agent_Llama 1 Dec 2007 15:42:02 3,691 posts
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    Definitely go for it. But don't spunk your money on something really expensive until you're sure you're going to devote the time to it. I've been learning since I was about 10, reached grade 7 standard, and one day I will hopefully do my Advanced certificate (or whatever it's called). It's hard work and requires a lot of patience, but playing the piano opens doors to loads of other instruments and is immensely satisfying. Go for it!
  • markypants 1 Dec 2007 17:18:58 2,859 posts
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    Do it!

    A good piano will be with you for life. I've been playing since I was 4 (am now 30) can't read music and play by ear (I have clever ears). Here is my piano: Sexy Piano!

    I also have a KORG trinity pro x for sale, it's a few years old but still works a treat. Boxed. 88 weighted key version. It was well over 1000 new.

    The bottom on on this page

    I have it stored at my parents near Oxford. Would deffo be willing to sell to somebody after a pretty intense bit of kit.

    M
  • Mageme 1 Dec 2007 18:01:47 2,325 posts
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    markypants wrote:
    Do it!

    A good piano will be with you for life. I've been playing since I was 4 (am now 30) can't read music and play by ear (I have clever ears). Here is my piano: Sexy Piano!


    That really IS sexy. I want one now!

    /looks at moth flying out of my wallet
  • markypants 2 Dec 2007 17:09:50 2,859 posts
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    Mageme wrote:
    markypants wrote:
    Do it!

    A good piano will be with you for life. I've been playing since I was 4 (am now 30) can't read music and play by ear (I have clever ears). Here is my piano: Sexy Piano!


    That really IS sexy. I want one now!

    /looks at moth flying out of my wallet

    It plays beautifully too. Best 2500 I've ever spent!

    /looks at credit card bill still waiting to be paid o_O
  • Shnitzel_12 8 Dec 2007 21:57:43 19 posts
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    Hi

    I say get a cheap one, like others have said, as it isn't for some people. And I prefer original piano, not digital. Just my opinion.

    To learn piano, first learn the simple scales. Then play easy songs like yankee doodle ^_^. Try harder songs and the rest of the scales. I emphasise try because it isn't something most people learn easily. Learn by heart a song that isn't hard or that you don't understand. Try exams now. Simple guide, hope it helped, good luck with your music!
  • Zackv4861 19 Oct 2014 07:12:00 1,191 posts
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    It's on my bucket list to play Piano and decided no is the time to do it. I've just bought a Casio AP250. I just wondered how best to go about teaching myself. Are the such things like guitar tabs for piano or any really good Youtube videos/websites anyone knows of? I have to say guitar was easy but piano looks really daunting.
  • Cupidstunt73 19 Oct 2014 09:49:20 75 posts
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    Best bet is to ring a local music shop and ask for some advice on piano books for beginners, I would also learn how to read music as well its really not that difficult and it will make songs and pieces much easier to learn in the long run.
  • Deleted user 19 October 2014 11:33:22
    Michael Aaron's books are a good place to start. They focus on classical but that is probably the best way to make progress. It also helps a lot to learn scales. You could get a book on scales, which would be a good way to get proper technique and fingering.
  • Lukus 19 Oct 2014 11:57:57 24,375 posts
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    I'd recommend getting some proper lessons. Otherwise you'll most likely just end up learning a bunch of bag habits that will hamper your progress later on down the line.
  • mal 19 Oct 2014 13:10:30 29,326 posts
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    Mr_Sleep wrote:
    a good way to get proper technique and fingering.
    Gotta work on dat fingering.
  • Deleted user 19 October 2014 13:20:27
    Lukus wrote:
    I'd recommend getting some proper lessons. Otherwise you'll most likely just end up learning a bunch of bag habits that will hamper your progress later on down the line.
    That is true to some degree fortunately for me my girlfriend is a grade seven pianist so she stamps out the bad habits while i been self-teaching. So I am not sure how it would be for others.

    I still think it is worth learning to read music on your own time, especially music theory stuff as that can be learnt without spending upwards of ten pounds for half an hour.
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