The cycling thread Page 539

  • Psychotext 24 Apr 2019 19:35:08 65,339 posts
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    I'm actually interested in the 530 for bikepacking... but the real question is how much they've lied about the battery life this time.
  • gamecat 24 Apr 2019 19:45:27 860 posts
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    They say up to 20 for the 530 (from 15), most I get from my 520 is about 8 or 9. It's compatible with the add on battery though, but thats another 120 quid.
  • Psychotext 24 Apr 2019 20:08:20 65,339 posts
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    They're pointless really, given you can just plug in a usb charger. I just want something that can actually do 12-16 hours then charge overnight.

    I bet it doesn't though.
  • MikeP 25 Apr 2019 22:45:13 2,939 posts
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    If you've not seen the finale of last weekend's Amstel Gold Race, and like a bit of bike racing, I really recommend you check it out. It was Quite Something.

    I've found a link to the race here: https://tiz-cycling.racing/videos/amstel-gold-race-2019-full-race/

    Last 25-30km are what you want, but the real action is from about 15km from home.
  • ozthegweat 15 May 2019 14:48:43 2,246 posts
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    So I decided to take up cycling, and already have an (excellent) Specialized Vado e-bike for my commute (20 miles/day, and I want to arrive at work without having to change my clothes or shower).

    Recently I remembered how I loved riding the shitty, rusty road bike of my grandfather when I stayed with my grandparents during the summers of my youth. I loved how light it was and how effortlessly you seemed to float on the street.

    So I decided I want a road bike. Just for fun and for some cardio training, primarily on roads and cycle paths and only in dry weather. From what I gathered I should be looking for an endurance road bike that puts some emphasis on ride comfort. Can you guys point me in a direction? Should I go for disc brakes? Should it have a Shimano 105 groupset? How wide should the tyres be? Is a carbon frame overkill for a beginner like me?

    Two things:
    1. I like to buy quality, and prefer to spend more from the outset rather than buy cheap stuff and then have to invest later on.
    2. A minimalist, understated, clean look is important to me. I like internal cable routing, and I hate how all bikes have their brand names in huge letters all over them. I guess it is possible to repaint the frame logo-less and in the color I want?

    What would be good picks? Trek Domane?
  • challenge_hanukkah 15 May 2019 14:50:35 11,025 posts
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    https://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/ribble-endurance-725-shimano-105/
  • elstoof 15 May 2019 15:08:09 23,661 posts
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    How much do you want to spend?
  • ozthegweat 15 May 2019 15:30:52 2,246 posts
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    Difficult to say. As I said, I like to buy quality, and don't mind spending a bit more to get something good, although I don't know what would be total overkill for a beginner like me.

    Let's say £1500-2000?
  • elstoof 15 May 2019 16:02:16 23,661 posts
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    Nothing will be overkill really, the better the bike the more youíll enjoy it, the more likely youíll stick at it. You can get a tidy bike for that sort of budget, like a Trek Emonda SL5 - Full 105 groupset and a nice light carbon frame for 1800 notes. When you get a bit better then all youíll need to do is upgrade the wheelset for something lighter or more aero.

    Need to decide if you want disc brakes as well, thatíll push the cost up by a few hundred. Personally I think discs are a complete waste of time on the road, pointless added weight and complication for no real benefit to road sport riding
  • elstoof 15 May 2019 16:07:36 23,661 posts
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    If you want something more stealthy then a Canyon Endurace CF8 is black on black, and you get a lot more bang for your buck too. Full Ultegra, 7.5kg weight and only 1900 euros, but youíll be buying mail order and canít sit on it before you buy. If youíre confident on sizing and possible a touch of assembly when it arrives, you canít go wrong really
  • ozthegweat 15 May 2019 16:39:14 2,246 posts
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    I just visited my local bike shop, they sell Specialized and Orbea road bikes. That Roubaix is one hell of a sexy machine...
  • mothercruncher 15 May 2019 16:44:15 16,384 posts
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    Ha. the creep. It begins....
  • mothercruncher 15 May 2019 16:54:54 16,384 posts
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    If you want one bike to do everything then a gravel/adventure bike is worth considering. It's 95% a road bike, but with a slightly stronger build and clearance for bigger tyres and would open up off road stuff too without you feeling too compromised on the road.
    Personally, I prefer the option of not doing this and thus needing to own both a road bike and a cyclocross bike, n+1 and all that.

    The Specialized Diverge would fit this bill.

    For what it's worth, I've a rim brake road bike and a disc CX bike. I kinda agree with els- it's still debatable whether everyone moving to disc lately truly brings benefits as it's pretty fucking easy to overwhelm the grip levels a road tyre can provide with the amount of bite discs have. I think riders would argue though that you win by having very, very predictable braking performance regardless of whether it's 25 degrees and sunny or 5 degrees and rainy, and they'd be right. Not vital though and they come with benefits and drawbacks, but, if I were buying a new road bike tomorrow, I'd probably get a disc version if only because I'd worry about the resale value of it in several years time when the market- rightly or wrongly- considers rim brakes well and truly out of date.
  • ozthegweat 15 May 2019 17:21:09 2,246 posts
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    Well the way I see it is: I already have a sturdy (e-)bike, with lights and a pannier and 47mm tyres. If there's a tour planned where I wouldn't feel comfortable with an endurance road bike, I'd simply take my current bike.

    I know it's not the same, but I don't see myself doing lots of off-road biking.
  • elstoof 15 May 2019 17:55:39 23,661 posts
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    I never ride my gravel bike, thereís just not that much in the way of gravel or light off road here. With some knobblies on itíll do a half decent rigid mtb job but I donít really dig off road riding either so unless a few mates are doing a jaunt through the fields I wonít go on my own. Itíll be shite for anything even slightly technical compared to a full sus anyway. Rather be on the roads so the gravel bike just sits in the basement looking sad, I think this gravel/adventure craze will be over in a few years, but then I think the whole cycling industry is due to have a big slump any day now
  • mothercruncher 15 May 2019 18:01:26 16,384 posts
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    It still slightly irritates me when I hear the term. There are cyclocross bikes thatíll take panniers. There already were ďgravelĒ bikes.
  • SnackPlissken 15 May 2019 18:03:20 1,096 posts
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    I actually ride my cyclocross a lot more than my road bike. Mainly because I can chuck it anywhere and it'll be fine, whereas my road bike I feel like I'm being shaken the fuck around on any sort of bad road surface.
  • elstoof 15 May 2019 18:04:45 23,661 posts
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    Cross bikes are subject to UCI maximum tyre sizes though, which is 35mm I think. Means the frame designers do have to worry about clearances. Gravel bikes can go bigger because they arenít going to be raced that way, and you get those 50mm balloon options
  • elstoof 15 May 2019 18:10:32 23,661 posts
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    For the specific task though theyíre great, I did the dirty Reiver last month and the bike performed perfectly. Itís just such a narrow focus for a bike though, unless you like near actual gravel fire roads, which I donít. Itís a bit shit on the road when youíre used to going faster on better bikes, and itís a bit shit off road with its rigid frame and aggressive road biased geometry. Good for commuting maybe, but again itís too aggressive for most riders
  • SnackPlissken 15 May 2019 18:19:40 1,096 posts
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    Yeah I'm really slow on the cyclocross, which I have only used once when I've been out with friends. I was so far behind haha. For me I'm more about having a quick gentle cycle round, than speed by myself. Obviously road bike for sticking with everyone else.
  • mothercruncher 15 May 2019 21:21:41 16,384 posts
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    Iím still going down the local downhill trails on my CX bike, that was the point of it for me. The off-road stuff is what I enjoy most and I still get the same buzz of skimming over stuff pinging left and right, only the speed it all happens at now is lower now so it hurts less if I crash. They are incredibly capable bikes.
  • Psychotext 15 May 2019 21:51:21 65,339 posts
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    Yeah. I've ridden on some quite technical terrain with people on CX and gravel bikes lately. If you've got some skill, you can definitely manage it.
  • askew 19 May 2019 21:25:11 19,536 posts
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    Spent the day pissing around setting up components on a new frame. Shifting is good, but big ring/small cog and its making a right rattle: looks like the jockey wheels are slightly right of the sprocket rather than underneath.

    Think I'll go Di2 next time. Or single speed.

    /me grumps
  • elstoof 19 May 2019 21:34:26 23,661 posts
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    Limit screw could be too tight
  • askew 19 May 2019 22:35:32 19,536 posts
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    Yup Ė you are right. The stupid thing is I have been fiddling with the L screw throughout.

    ETA: wish I had a stand instead of being hooked up to the trainer. Hard work turning this gear by hand.

    Edited by askew at 22:41:33 19-05-2019
  • elstoof 20 May 2019 07:31:05 23,661 posts
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    I got an Oypla bike stand off amazon for 28 quid, and itís really good. Only got it because my expensive park tools spider stand wonít accept thru axles, so needed one I could clamp to the seatpost. I never bother using the park tools one any more, the cheapo Oypla does the job perfectly
  • gamecat 20 May 2019 08:19:44 860 posts
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    Check out the park tools vid on derailleur adjustment, you set limits first, then start messing around with indexing. Doing it the other way round is just going to hurt your brain.
  • mothercruncher 20 May 2019 08:59:55 16,384 posts
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    Make sure you mech hangar is straight before you do. You can push the mech down onto the cassette in order to more easily see whether youíve got things aligned, or temporarily take all of the length out of the limit screw to achieve the same thing. Just double check alignment once more once youíve wound it back to the right position, again in case of a hangar thatís slightly skewed.
  • Psychotext 20 May 2019 12:47:08 65,339 posts
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    Just one of my gears is wonky on my 1x12 setup bike. Absolutely no idea why. Going to be a pig to fix without ruining all the rest. lol
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